Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 622 items for :

  • Brill | Rodopi x
  • Literature and Cultural Studies x
  • All content x
Clear All
In: Simone de Beauvoir Studies

Abstract

María Dodera’s theater production Simone, mujer partida (2017) builds on current movements against gender violence in Latin America. Actor Gabriela Iribarren’s portrayal of Dodera’s Beauvoir suggests we view her via a process of interaction between internal and external dialogic selves as she seeks subjectivity—a dynamic Iribarren makes evident through the juxtaposition of ephemeral live performance and the (re)presentation of Beauvoir’s life history. Her monologue is thus not univocal, but layered with multiple voices from the past and present.

In: Simone de Beauvoir Studies

Abstract

The author argues, with reference to a number of Merleau-Ponty’s unpublished manuscripts, that Merleau-Ponty’s notion of encroachment (empiétement) has origins in Simone de Beauvoir’s 1945 novel, The Blood of Others. He examines how the two philosophers approach the encroachment of freedoms, the political stance of pacifism, and the interpretation of Voltaire’s Candide (Part I). The impact of Élisabeth Lacoin’s death on Beauvoir’s and Merleau-Ponty’s philosophies, as well as their relationships with Jean-Paul Sartre, is also considered (Part II).

In: Simone de Beauvoir Studies
In: Simone de Beauvoir Studies
In: Simone de Beauvoir Studies
In: Simone de Beauvoir Studies
In: Simone de Beauvoir Studies

Résumé

« Elle m’ intimidait, comme m’ intimident les enfants, certains adolescents et tous les gens qui se servent autrement que moi du langage. Je suppose que de mon côté, je la mettais mal à l’ aise. » Par ces mots extraits de La Force des choses, Beauvoir revenait sur le mélange d’ intimidation et d’ embarras qui flottait sur ses rencontres avec la jeune Françoise Sagan. Cet article se propose de faire revivre l’ histoire des relations oubliées entre ces deux icônes des lettres françaises.

In: Simone de Beauvoir Studies
Author: Sonia Kruks

Abstract

The “new materialisms” offer an important critique of “human exceptionalism,” challenging deeply held conceptions of “man” as a “sovereign subject.” However, they tend to overstate their claims by ignoring those qualities of freedom that still remain distinctive to human life. This article turns to Beauvoir to make a case for a more “modest” human exceptionalism: while she also grounds the human inextricably in the material, Beauvoir offers fuller resources than do new materialisms for examining human freedom and human responsibility to resist its oppression.

In: Simone de Beauvoir Studies
In: Simone de Beauvoir Studies