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Terror and Intrigue
In Gnostic Countercultures, fourteen scholars investigate countercultural aspects associated with the gnostic which is broadly conceived with reference to the claim to have special knowledge of the divine, which either transcends or transgresses conventional religious knowledge. The papers explore the concept of the gnostic in Western culture from the ancient world to the modern New Age. Contributors trace the emergence, persistence, and disappearance of gnostic religious currents that are perceived to be countercultural, inverted, transgressive and/or subversive in their relationship to conventional religions and their claims to knowledge. The essays represent a selection of the papers delivered at the international congress Gnostic Countercultures: Terror and Intrigue convened at Rice University, March 26-28, 2015. The essays were originally published in Gnosis 1.1-2 (2016) and are available for the first time under separate cover.

The article focuses on a neglected passage in the sixth Catechesis of Cyril of Jerusalem in which he speaks of the Manichaean ‘ceremony of the fig’. First I give the Greek text and a fresh translation of Cat. VI,33; then I analyse its contents. I note that Cyril seems to have been well acquainted with books of the Manichaeans (in all likelihood Mani’s Treasure, maybe others as well) in which the myth of the Seduction of the Archons was told and investigate his description of the Manichaean ‘ceremony of the fig’. Cyril’s account seems to be corroborated by one or even two of the miniatures from Central Asia in which figs appear to be central in Manichaean sacred meals.

In: Mani and Augustine
In: Mani and Augustine
In: Mani and Augustine
In: Mani and Augustine
In: Mani and Augustine
In: Mani and Augustine

This review article describes the study of ‘Augustine and Manichaeism’ in context, mainly focusing on the recent book on the theme—the first one of a projected trilogy—by Jason David BeDuhn.

In: Mani and Augustine
In: Mani and Augustine
In: Mani and Augustine