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Text and Context in the Modern History of Chinese Religions

Redemptive Societies and Their Sacred Texts

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Edited by Philip Clart, David Ownby and Chien-chuan Wang

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Edited by Jonathan A. Silk, Leiden University, Editor-in-Chief. Consulting Editors: Oskar von Hinüber, Albert-Ludwigs University of Freiburg and Vincent Eltschinger, Austrian Academy of Sciences
Brill’s Encyclopedia of Buddhism is the first comprehensive academic reference work devoted to the plurality of Buddhist traditions across Asia, offering readers a balanced and detailed treatment of this complex phenomenon in six thematically arranged volumes: literature and languages (I, publ. 2015), lives (II, publ. 2019), thought (III), history (IV), life and practice (V), index and remaining issues (VI).
Each volume contains substantial original essays by many of the world’s foremost scholars, essays which not only cover basic information and well-known issues but which also venture into areas as yet untouched by modern scholarship. An essential tool for anyone interested in Buddhism.
An online resource will provide easy access to the encyclopedia’s ever-growing corpus of information.
Brill’s Encyclopedia of Buddhism is under the general editorial control of Jonathan Silk ( Leiden University, editor-in-chief), Richard Bowring ( University of Cambridge) and Vincent Eltschinger ( École Pratique des Hautes Études, Paris). In addition, each volume has a dedicated board of specialist editors.

Asia in the Making of Christianity

Conversion, Agency, and Indigeneity, 1600s to the Present

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Edited by Richard Fox Young and Jonathan A. Seitz

Drawing on first person accounts, Asia in the Making of Christianity studies conversion in the lives of Christians throughout Asia, past and present. Fifteen contributors treat perennial questions about conversion: continuity and discontinuity, conversion and communal conflict, and the politics of conversion. Some study individuals (An Chunggŭn of Korea, Liang Fa of China, Nehemiah Goreh of India), while others treat ethnolinguistic groups or large-scale movements. Converts sometimes appear as proto-nationalists, while others are suspected of cultural treason. Some transition effortlessly from leadership in one religious community into Christian ministry, while others re-convert to new forms of Christianity. The accounts collected here underscore the complexity of conversion, balancing individual agency with broader social trends and combining micro- with macrocontextual approaches.