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Bernard Spolsky

Until quite recently, the term Diaspora (usually with the capital) meant the dispersion of the Jews in many parts of the world. Now, it is recognized that many other groups have built communities distant from their homeland, such as Overseas Chinese, South Asians, Romani, Armenians, Syrian and Palestinian Arabs. To explore the effect of exile on language repertoires, the article traces the sociolinguistic development of the many Jewish Diasporas, starting with the community exiled to Babylon, and following through exiles in Muslim and Christian countries in the Middle Ages and later. It presents the changes that occurred linguistically after Jews were granted full citizenship. It then goes into details about the phenomenon and problem of the Jewish return to the homeland, the revitalization and revernacularization of the Hebrew that had been a sacred and literary language, and the rediasporization that accounts for the cases of maintenance of Diaspora varieties.

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Scott Shinabargar

If the transgressions of modern French poetry have been amply noted at thematic and formal levels, they remain largely unremarked at the most visceral level of reading. Indebted to, while problematizing the Kristevan concept of sémiotique, Scott Shinabargar’s The Revolting Body of Poetry reveals how the very “matter” of key works forces us to enact these transgressions, when articulating textures of offensive lexica and imagery. While certain phonemes provide access to previously untapped forces, first apparent in Baudelaire and Lautréamont, compulsive repetitions produce expressive inflation, diffusing any initial impact. Césaire and Char, however, demonstrate an acquired control of these forces, intensity contained. Shinabargar concludes with a survey of contemporary poets, inviting readers to consider the legacy of revolting poetics.

Michael H. Long, Gisela Granena and Yucel Yilmaz

The past 50 years have witnessed achievement of a set of widely attested empirical findings on major research issues in sla. They pertain to such matters as cross-linguistic influence; processes and sequences in interlanguage development; age effects; incidental and intentional learning and implicit and explicit knowledge; the role of the linguistic environment and of the broader social context as sources of positive and negative evidence and of opportunities for input, interaction and output; and effects of individual differences in language aptitudes and other cognitive and affect variables. Robust findings in any scientific field constitute empirical ‘problems’ that require explanation and motivate theoretical work. In this inaugural volume of Brill Research Perspectives in Multilingualism and Second Language Acquisition, Michael Long, Gisela Granena and Yucel Yilmaz review work on a selection of these issues, and note implications of some of the work for language teaching, educational language planning, human migration, and other important matters of social concern.

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Scott Shinabargar

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Scott Shinabargar

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Scott Shinabargar

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Scott Shinabargar

Editor-in-Chief William Ritchie and Tej K. Bhatia

Brill Research Perspectives in Multilingualism and Second Language Acquisition provides in-depth and authoritative surveys of key topics within these disciplines. The articles are written by leading scholars in the field who have been invited to contribute and not only give an overview of the field but also their own unique perspective on it. References are hyperlinked to the original sources where possible, giving scholars the opportunity to stay on stop of the literature or reading up on a subject quickly.

Brill Research Perspectives in Multilingualism and Second Language Acquisition publishes survey articles and position papers in the following subjects:

• Age (Maturation) and Aging (Attrition)
• Aphasia & Multilingualism
• Basic Research & Language Pedagogy
• Bilingualism/Multilingualism
• Child & Adult Second Language Acquisition
• Cognition & Consequences
• Forensics
• Individual Differences
• Language Contact
• Language Impairment
• Language Mixing & Hybrid Systems
• Language Processing (e.g. sentence & concept)
• Language Variation
• Learner types (e.g. Heritage; Non-Native)
• Literacy
• Mental Health
• Memory
• Motivation & Attitude
• Neurology & Neuropsychology
• Phonology , Morphology, Syntax; Pragmatics and SLA
• Research Methodology
• Sign Language
• Social Identity
• Social Media and Social Networks
• Theoretical Frameworks (e.g. Generative; Cognitive Linguistic; Emergentist; Information Processing; Sociolinguistic)
• Third Language Acquisition
• Thinking and Multilingual Competence

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Scott Shinabargar