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Preaching in the Patristic Era

Sermons, Preachers, and Audiences in the Latin West

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Edited by Anthony Dupont, Shari Boodts, Gert Partoens and Johan Leemans

Preaching in the Patristic Era. Sermons, Preachers, Audiences in the Latin West offers a state of the art of the study of the sermons of Latin Patristic authors. Parts I and II of the volume cover general topics, from the transmission of early Christian Latin sermons to iconography, from rhetoric to reflections on the impact of Latin preaching. Part III offers fourteen chapters devoted to Latin preachers such as Augustine, Gregory the Great, Maximus of Turin, and to collections of sermons, such as Arian sermons, preaching in 4th-century Spain, or sermons translated from Greek. By outlining the relevant sources, methodologies, and issues, this volume provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of Latin patristic preaching.
Contributors are Pauline Allen, Lisa Bailey, Andrea Bizzozzero, Shari Boodts, Andrew Cain, Nicolas De Maeyer, François Dolbeau, Jutta Dresken-Weiland, Geoffrey Dunn, Anthony Dupont, Camille Gerzaguet, Bruno Judic, Rémi Gounelle, Johan Leemans, Wendy Mayer, Robert McEachnie, Bronwen Neil, Gert Partoens, Adam Ployd, Eric Rebillard, Maureen Tilley, Sever Voicu, Clemens Weidmann and Liuwe Westra.

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Edited by Alexander C. Murray

Gregory, bishop of Tours (573-594), was among the most prolific writers of his age and uniquely managed to cover the genres of history, hagiography, and ecclesiastical instruction. He not only wrote about events (of the secular, spiritual, and even natural variety) but about himself as an actor and witness. Though his work (especially the Histories) has been recycled and studied for centuries, our grasp of an even basic understanding of it, never mind Gregory’s significance in the history of the late antique West, has hardly yet attained a definitive perspective.
A Companion to Gregory of Tours brings together fourteen scholars who provide an expert guide to interpreting his works, his period, and his legacy in religious and historical studies.

Contributors are: Pascale Bourgain, Roger Collins, John J. Contreni, Stefan Esders, Martin Heinzelmann, Yitzhak Hen, John K. Kitchen, Simon Loseby, Alexander Callander Murray, Patrick Périn, Joachim Pizarro, Helmut Reimitz, Michael Roberts, Richard Shaw.

Renaissance Encounters

Greek East and Latin West

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Edited by Marina S. Brownlee and Dimitri H. Gondicas

The present volume has grown out of the conference held at Princeton University on November 12-14, 2009. Its essays explore a coherent, interrelated nexus of topics that illuminate our understanding of the cultural transactions (social, political, economic, religious and artistic) of the Greek East and Latin West: unexpected cultural appropriations and forms of resistance, continuity and change, the construction and hybridization of traditions in a wide expanse of the eastern Mediterranean. Areas that the volume addresses include the benefits and liabilities of periodization, philosophical and political exchanges, monastic syncretism between the Orthodox and Catholic faiths, issues of romance composition, and economic currency and the currency of fashion as East and West interact.
Contributors are Roderick Beaton, Peter Brown, Marina S. Brownlee, Giles Constable, Maria Evangelatou, Dimitri Gondicas, Judith Herrin, Elizabeth Jeffreys, Marc D. Lauxtermann, Stuart M. McManus, John Monfasani, Maria G. Parani, Linda Safran, Teresa Shawcross and Alan M. Stahl.

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Edited by Ilinca Tanaseanu-Döbler and Marvin Döbler

Although religious education is a much-debated topic in present-day History of Religions, its study focuses almost exclusively on contemporary phenomena. Furthermore, this field of study still lacks a comprehensive theoretical framework to structure research. The volume presented here explores religious education from a historical perspective, focusing on source material from pre-modern Europe. Scholars from the History of Religions, Theology, Classical Philology, Medieval Studies and Byzantine Studies contribute their expertise to analyse selected aspects of religious education in Antiquity, Byzantium and the Middle Ages, highlighting the diverse concepts of education, educational contents, actors, media, methods, ideals and intentions at play, and anchoring their case studies in the broader panorama of European history. Based on this material, the editors propose a systematic framework to map the research field.

The Politics of Identity in Visigothic Spain

Religion and Power in the Histories of Isidore of Seville

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Jamie Wood

Previous scholarship has interpreted Bishop Isidore of Seville (d. 636) retrospectively as the architect of the medieval Spanish church, as the father of Spanish identity, and as a key figure in the transmission of Classical and Patristic learning to the Middle Ages. Drawing on recent studies on identity formation in the early medieval period and an upsurge in interest in late antique Spain, this book examines the historical Isidore as a social actor managing a complex web of responsibilities and relationships. A comparative analysis of Isidore's historical works demonstrates that writing about the past was a method for reconciling Visigothic kings, nobles and Spanish bishops in a period of transformation. This results in a fresh portrait of Isidore as motivated, both politically and pastorally, to balance competing interests and ensure the spiritual and material security of the people of Spain.