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The Anthology of the Works of Ugo Spirito captures the trajectory of Ugo Spirito’s complex body of thought that spanned more than fifty years, from 1921 to 1977. While confronting difficult contemporary problems related to philosophy and science, liberalism and socialism, fascism and communism, and other economic and ideological aspects such as corporativism and democracy, Spirito revealed a persistent desire to reach truth and the absolute. Yet, he also voiced his failure to consistently believe in any philosophical or political system. Unable to reach ‘incontrovertibility,’ he consistently examined his ideas, developing at the same time the ‘antinomic’ approach, a method of critical analysis that undermined any truth considered ‘incontrovertible.’ Today, Spirito stands as one of most anti-conformist Italian thinkers for he challenged the certainties of modern thought.
The Philosophy of R.G. Collingwood, 2nd edition
Since its appearance in 1981, History as a Science by Jan van der Dussen has been welcomed as a coherent and comprehensive study of the many aspects of Collingwood’s philosophy of history, including its development and reception. The book was the first to pay attention to Collingwood’s unpublished manuscripts, and to his work as an archaeologist and historian, herewith opening up a new angle in Collingwood studies. The republication of this volume meets an increasing demand to make the book available for future Collingwood scholars, and people interested in Collingwood’s philosophy. The present edition of History as a Science includes updated references to the published manuscripts and an added preface.
Why does a magnet attract iron? Why does a compass needle point north? Although the magnet or lodestone was known since antiquity, magnetism only became an important topic in natural science and technology in the early modern period. In Magnes Christoph Sander explores this fascinating subject and draws, for the first time, a comprehensive picture of early modern research on magnetism (c. 1500–1650). Covering all disciplines of this period, Magnes examines what scholars understood by ‘magnet’ and ‘magnetism,’ which properties they ascribed to it, in which instruments and practices magnetism was employed, and how they tried to explain this exciting phenomenon. This historical panorama is based on circa 1500 historical sources, including over 100 manuscripts.
Eine wissenschaftstheoretische Untersuchung zu Intervention, Invarianz und Prognose
Sind die Wirtschaftswissenschaften eine Wissenschaft? Benedikt Fait stellt sich auf Grundlage kausaltheoretischer Überlegungen dieser Sichtweise entgegen und kommt zu einem überraschenden Ergebnis.
Ziel des Buches ist die Anwendung der zurzeit viel diskutierten interventionistischen Kausaltheorie (James Woodward) auf die Ökonomik. Diese Anwendung kommt zu dem Ergebnis, dass Kausalurteile in der Ökonomik nur unzureichend zu begründen sind. Auf Grundlage wissenschaftstheoretischer Überlegungen wird daher eine neue Perspektive auf die Ökonomik vorgeschlagen: Statt sich primär an den Naturwissenschaften zu orientieren, sollte sich die Ökonomik vielmehr als eine Art abstrakte Kunst oder abstraktes Handwerk begreifen, das in der handelnden Auseinandersetzung mit seinem Gegenstand – der Ökonomie – ein tendenziell idiographisches und daher nur bedingt verallgemeinerbares Erfahrungswissen eruiert.
Interdisziplinäre Perspektiven zwischen Philosophie und Praxis
Wissenschaftsreflexion: Eine neue und interdisziplinäre Perspektive auf die Geschichte, Theorie, Ethik und auf die praktischen Auswirkungen wissenschaftlicher Forschung und Erkenntnis.
Die Wissenschaften sehen sich gegenwärtig mit starken Debatten über ihre Geltungs‐ und Wahrheitsansprüche, ihre Vertrauenswürdigkeit sowie über ihre Rolle in der Gesellschaft konfrontiert. Diese Diskussionen umfassen solch unterschiedliche Themen wie etwa Klimawandel, Gentechnik, Impfungen und ‚Alternativmedizin‘ oder Evolutionstheorien. Mit diesem Band wird erstmals der Begriff der Wissenschaftsreflexion vorgestellt und eingeführt. Er umfasst interdisziplinäre Beiträge zu Grundlagen- und Anwendungsfragen, die gemeinsam eine pluralistische Perspektive eröffnen und auch konkrete Lösungsmöglichkeiten aufzeigen.
This book examines the tension between formal and informal methods in philosophy. The rise of analytic philosophy was accompanied by the development of formal logic and many successful applications of formal methods. But analytical philosophy does not rely on formal methods alone. Elements of broadly understood informal logic and logical semiotics, procedures used in natural sciences and humanities, and various kinds of intuition also belong to the philosopher’s toolkit. Papers gathered in the book concern the opposition formality–informality as well as other pairs, such as methodology versus metaphilosophy, interdisciplinarity versus intradisciplinarity, and methodological uniformity versus diversity of sciences. Problems of the nature of logic and the explanatory role of mathematical theories are also discussed.
Editor: Philip MacEwen

Idealist Alternatives to Materialist Philosophies of Science (ed. Philip MacEwen) makes the case that there are other, and arguably better, ways of understanding science than materialism. Philosophical idealism leads the list of challengers but critical realism and various forms of pluralism are fully articulated as well. To ensure that the incumbent is adequately represented, the volume includes a major defence of materialism/naturalism from Anaxagoras to the present. Contributors include Leslie Armour, John D. Norton, and Fred Wilson with a Foreword by Nicholas Rescher. For anyone interested in whether materialism has a monopoly on science, this volume presents a good case for materialism but a better one for its alternatives.

Bridging Hegelian Dialectics and Marxian Models
In How Language Informs Mathematics Dirk Damsma shows how Hegel’s and Marx’s systematic dialectical analysis of mathematical and economic language helps us understand the structure and nature of mathematical and capitalist systems. More importantly, Damsma shows how knowledge of the latter can inform model assumptions and help improve models.

His book provides a blueprint for an approach to economic model building that does away with arbitrarily chosen assumptions and is sensitive to the institutional structures of capitalism. In light of the failure of mainstream economics to understand systemic failures like the financial crisis and given the arbitrary character of most assumptions in mainstream models, such an approach is desperately needed.

Abstract

The management of shelter dogs whose dangerousness to people has been verified is an aspect of considerable importance as it assesses animal welfare, public health, and the management of human and economic resources. In this paper, we briefly discuss the case of a large sized male dog that had bitten people several times and was declared to be at high risk of causing danger. Despite a behavioral rehabilitation program, the initial evidence of dangerousness remained unchanged, thus, there was no possibility of putting the dog up for adoption. This clinical case is an example of how conflicting it is for a behaviorist to choose ethically when considering euthanasia and animal welfare.

In: Journal of Applied Animal Ethics Research

Abstract

During the last 30 years the law regarding stray dogs in Italy evolved from employing euthanasia for these dogs after three days, to long term kenneling of all dogs not seriously or incurably ill or proven aggressive. This was a highly ethical law whose application was extremely difficult because of the lack of financial resources and adequate kenneling facilities. It is fair, necessary and urgent to adopt ethical choices in managing problems connected with stray dogs but decisions must be taken in consideration with thorough evaluation of the situation. Is long term kenneling a correct way to safeguard dogs’ welfare? Are there tools available to evaluate the welfare of these dogs? The available data about the number of stray dogs, both in kennels and roaming, are up to date? Are there financial resources available? Do the structures necessary to accommodate these animals exist and are they adequate? Countries that still have a kill policy should consider these aspects before legislating on this issue.

In: Journal of Applied Animal Ethics Research