Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 15 items for :

  • Brill | Sense x
  • Open accessible content x
  • Status (Books): Published x
Clear All

Power and Possibility

Adult Education in a Diverse and Complex World

Series:

Edited by Fergal Finnegan and Bernie Grummell

Power has been a defining and constitutive theme of adult education scholarship for over a century and is a central concern of many of the most famous and influential thinkers in the field. Adult education has been particularly interested in how an analysis of power can be used to support transformative learning and democratic participation. In a fragile and interdependent world these questions are more important than ever. The aim of this collection is to offer an analysis of power and possibility in adult education which acknowledges, analyzes and responds to the complexity and diversity that characterizes contemporary education and society.

Power and Possibility: Adult Education in a Diverse and Complex World explores the topic of power and possibility theoretically, historically and practically through a range of perspectives and in relation to varied areas of interest within contemporary adult education. It is concerned with addressing how power works in and through adult education today by exploring what has changed in recent years and what is shaping and driving policy. Alongside this the book explores ways of theorizing learning, power and transformation that builds and extends adult education philosophy. In particular it takes up the themes of diversity and solidarity and explores barriers and possibilities for change in relation to these themes.

The Societal Unconscious

Psychosocial Perspectives on Adult Learning

Series:

Edited by Henning Salling Olesen

The Societal Unconscious presents an innovative development of theory and methodology for adult education and learning research, recognizing psychodynamic dimensions of learning processes. With few exceptions the unconscious has been neglected in critical adult education research. The psychosocial approach in this book seeks to re-integrate the societal and the psychodynamic dimensions in analyzing adult learners and learning processes.

The book responds to contemporary awareness of the societal and cultural nature of subjectivity with a new material and dialectic psychosocial theory, comprising conscious as well as unconscious levels. Tracing interdisciplinary inspirations it sets a new broad horizon for in-depth understanding of learning in everyday life.

A number of empirical analyses demonstrate the entanglement of societal and psychodynamic dimensions of learning. Firstly, a part of the chapters deals with the complex subjective continuities and discontinuities in individual learning and career. Secondly, other chapters comprise analyses of leadership and the social psychology of organizational processes, and the psycho-social aspects of institutional regeneration. Thirdly, the book presents outlooks into the social psychology dimensions of wider societal and political processes, including "identity politics" and xenophobia. A last chapter finalizes the theoretical basis of the methodology.

Series:

Edited by Karin Priem and Frederik Herman

Fabricating Modern Societies: Education, Bodies, and Minds in the Age of Steel, edited by Karin Priem and Frederik Herman, offers new interdisciplinary and transnational perspectives on the history of industrialization and societal transformation in early twentieth-century Luxembourg. The individual chapters focus on how industrialists addressed a large array of challenges related to industrialization, borrowing and mixing ideas originating in domains such as corporate identity formation, mediatization, scientification, technological innovation, mechanization, capitalism, mass production, medicalization, educationalization, artistic production, and social utopia, while competing with other interest groups who pursued their own goals. The book looks at different focus areas of modernity, and analyzes how humans created, mediated, and interacted with the technospheres of modern societies.

Contributors: Klaus Dittrich, Irma Hadzalic, Frederik Herman, Enric Novella, Ira Plein, Françoise Poos, Karin Priem, and Angelo Van Gorp.

Series:

Edited by Wiel Veugelers

Education for Democratic Intercultural Citizenship (EDIC) is very relevant in contemporary societies. All citizens, but in particular teachers, curriculum developers, educational policy makers, and educational professionals in civil society (NGOs) have a crucial role in this. Seven European universities are working together in developing a curriculum to prepare their students for this important academic, societal and political task. As part of an Erasmus+ Strategic Partnership they each develop a module in the area of moral, intercultural and citizenship education. All modules are international and inquiry oriented, and make links with society.

In this book the leading scholars write the theoretical background of their module, their curriculum guidelines and goals, the concrete programmes, and the experiences of students. The universities had an annual intensive programme in which students and teachers of all universities came together to have try-outs of parts of the modules. These programmes contributed strongly to the network building of researchers, teachers and students.

The activities have given a strong stimulus to the implementation of Education for Democratic Intercultural Citizenship in the participating universities and in educational organisations worldwide. The experiences show both the necessity and the relevance of this topic and this kind of collaboration.

Continuity and Discontinuity in Learning Careers

Potentials for a Learning Space in a Changing World

Series:

Edited by Barbara Merrill, Andrea Galimberti, Adrianna Nizinska and José González-Monteagudo

Continuity and Discontinuity in Learning Careers: Potentials for a Learning Space in a Changing World focuses on the new challenges and threats posed to adult education as a potential way out of the economic crisis and social change. It explores the role of adult education in relation to the continuity and discontinuity of the learning careers and identities of adults in a range of adult education learning contexts in Europe and beyond. The focus is on non-traditional students and issues of inequality such as class, gender, ethnicity, age, disability and how inequalities may enable or constrain their learning careers and identities.

EqualBITE

Gender equality in higher education

Edited by Judy Robertson

“The ivory tower, like other stately homes in the UK, might present a grand façade to the world but closer inspection reveals a dark, spidery basement full of inequalities.”

Gender imbalances still exist across all areas of higher education. From salaries and promotion, to representation in the curriculum, formal approaches and good intentions rarely address the full complexity. EqualBITE digs into the messy reality of higher education gender issues, presenting people’s stories, experiences and frustrations and – more importantly – what can be done. University of Edinburgh students and staff share real-life experiences of gender challenges and opportunities, and their constructive responses. The book condenses current academic research into practical actions that do make a difference.

EqualBITE is a pragmatic and positive response to gender issues in academia – a catalyst for creating a culture which is better for everyone.

“We were so pleased to see this new guide to one aspect of diversity—gender equality—and to see how good it is: the book is comprehensive; it is raw, honest and personal; and it is very well written. It is a book both for reading cover-to-cover and for dipping into, and it will be enormously influential.” – Jim Smith Director of Science, Wellcome Trust & Gemma Tracey Diversity & Inclusion Programme Manager – Science & Research, Wellcome Trust

“The balance between data and lived experience equip the reader with the vital understanding of the depth of institutionalised inequality…This is recommended reading for anyone working in higher education who truly wants to create a fairer culture of women.” – Talat Yaqoob Director, Equate Scotland

“I really enjoyed reading the recipes - they combine humour with practical advice on how to tackle important gender issues.” – Fiona Watt Vice-Dean Research and Impact, Faculty of Life Science and Medicine, King's College London


Per Dahl

FREELY AVAILABLE ONLINE AS OPEN ACCESS BOOK!

This book illustrates the acquisition of knowledge in a musician’s performative practice, and how this can contribute to the development of Artistic Research. Using a broad understanding of ‘knowledge,’ the first part of the book presents aspects of the practitioner knowledge a musician develops through daily exercises and performances. Technical and practical skills, creativity and music reading are central topics.
Part II describes four different methodologies of knowledge accumulation. First is the hypothetico-deductive method (music as object). Then the author asks, “Where is the musical work?” After an introduction to semiotics, the question that must follow is “Is music a language?” Following up methodologies focusing on intersubjective and contextual topics, the presentation of hermeneutics generates the question “What happens to the music when you are listening?” Being the most subjective, phenomenology is the last methodology to be presented. The question it poses is “Are analysis and interpretation two sides of the same coin?”
Artistic research is a new perspective in knowledge acquisition, and the performing artist is the pivot point. The obvious insight positioning music beyond the score is elaborated into a critique of the representational theory as a relevant ontological discourse in music. As an alternative, the potential in embodied meaning theories is discussed through cognitive, linguistic and artistic approaches. Artistic expressions convey the subjective practitioner knowledge based on the difference between the objective sign and the intersubjective expression. This makes music as communication the ultimate topic. In conclusion, understanding the meaning construction and the conditions of artistic content are both of importance in artistic research.

Series:

Edited by ESREA Beneficiary, Rob Evans, Ewa Kurantowicz and Emilio Lucio-Villegas

FREELY AVAILABLE ONLINE AS OPEN ACCESS BOOK!

Can adult education and learning be understood without reference to community and people’s daily lives? The response to be found in the chapters of this volume say emphatically no, they cannot. Adult learning can be best understood if we look at the social life of people in communities, and this book is an attempt to recover this view.
The chapters of this volume reflect ongoing research in the field of adult education and learning in and with communities. At the same time the work of the authors presented here offers a very vital reflection of the work of the ESREA research network Between Local and Global—Adult Learning and Communities. The chapters showcase the broad range of professional practice, the variety in both methodology and theoretical background, as well as the impressive scope of field research experience the authors bring to bear in their papers.
The first section provides the broad view of research into adult learning and community development emphasising how social movements are at the heart of local and global change and that they are critically important sources of power. The second section focuses in on the practice of educators/mediators working in local and regional contexts in which the tensions of the wider policy and discourse environment impact on adult learners. The third section privileges the view at the close level of research inside local communities in the field.
International researchers and practitioners, particularly young researchers, who are active in adult learning and in local/global communities will be interested in this book. The emphasis of the chapters is on participatory and emancipatory social research. Empowerment of women in rural communities, involvement of communities in social and environmental movements, power-sharing in community research projects and the exposure of hegemonic, globalising forces at work in ethnic communities are among the themes developed in this volume.

Finn Egil Tønnessen and Per Henning Uppstad

FREELY AVAILABLE ONLINE AS OPEN ACCESS BOOK!

Careful reflection on the concepts and methods used is a prerequisite for further development in any field of research.
The authors think cognitive psychology has become too dominant in reading and dyslexia research, arguing that it should be combined with behaviourism and connectionism—in part by focusing on the concept of ‘skill’. The key components of a skill are claimed to be automaticity, awareness and shifts between them. Reading is defined as an interpretative skill, which should be viewed from the perspective of hermeneutics.
The authors use these fundamental analyses and definitions to shed new light on the ‘balanced approach to reading instruction’, ‘reading fluency’ and other key concepts. The book also deals with problems in the definition of ‘dyslexia’ and proposes a method to arrive at clear and fruitful definitions. It concludes with a chapter trying to answer the question of in what sense, or to what extent, it can be claimed that reading and dyslexia research has made progress.
The book mainly builds on articles published over the past 25 years by Professor Finn Egil Tønnessen at the National Centre for Reading Education and Research, Stavanger, Norway.

Series:

Edited by Joanna Ostrouch-Kami and Cristina C. Vieira

FREELY AVAILABLE ONLINE AS OPEN ACCESS BOOK!

This book is the third production from the ESREA Gender network and, once more, an opportunity to let the readers discover, or to know more, for a better understanding of questions related to gender and adult learning. It shows how researchers can be deeply involved in this specific field of adult education. The notion of informal learning has already been treated as a chapter in the 2003s book, but it becomes central and relevant in this new book considering the growing complexity of our society.
The editors insist in their title on “private world(s)” but the content of the book proves that informal learning processes, aside the self, are combined with contextual opportunities, which have been chosen or not. Their introduction remains what has to be known about the concepts of gender and informal learning. The contributors enlighten the debate with their geographical diversities all over Europe, but also with their theoretical systems of reference and the social contexts that have been analysed.
With the first part of this book, entitled “private spheres”, it is a sum of painful gendered discriminations and injustices which are presented and analysed. We can’t escape to the emotions it produces especially with the soldiers after the war and the men’s breath cancer: both researches related to men and the specificity of their suffering. This is an interesting and quite new opportunity to question gender.
In the second part related to “minorities and activism”, we discover groups who learn through their organised fights against discriminations. Emotions let place to a positive energy when we discover the strategies that feminists, or migrants or also retired men find to question the society in which they live. The authors show us not only what is learned by such communities, but also what their environment can learn from them.
The last part of the book drives us to different “contexts of informal learning”, mostly related to opportunities and obstacles in education and work situations. Community training, social work studies, scientist’s work and management school are the contexts chosen to clarify where the stereotypes and the discriminations along the lifespan for women are. From East to West and North to South of Europe, it seems once more that the debate presents a lot of similarities.