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Proceedings of the Seventh Workshop of the International Network Impact of Empire (Nijmegen, June 20-24, 2006)
This volume presents the proceedings of the seventh workshop of the international thematic network 'Impact of Empire', which concentrates on the history of the Roman Empire and brings together ancient historians, archaeologists, classicists and specialists on Roman law from some 30 European and North American universities. The seventh volume focuses on the impact that crises had on the development and functioning of the Roman Empire from the Republic to Late Imperial times. The following themes are treated: the role of crises in the empire as a whole; the relationship between crises and the Roman economy; modes in which crises influenced the presentation of emperors, and the impact of crises on and reception in (legal) writings.
Proceedings of the Sixth Workshop of the International Network Impact of Empire (Roman Empire, 200 B.C. – A.D. 476), Capri, Italy, March 29-April 2, 2005
To many inhabitants of the Roman Empire the army was the most visible representation of imperial power. Roman troops were the embodiment of imperial control. Military installations and buildings, the imperial guard, other troops, fleets, and militarily tinged works of art brought home the majesty of Rome to anybody who saw them, in Rome and in other parts of the Empire. With Roman armies came administrators, taxes and requisitions in cash and kind, traders, permanently residing veterans and military personnel, useful relations between local notables and Roman military cadre, and chances of upward social mobility. This sixth volume in the series Impact of Empire focuses on these topics.
Proceedings of the Eighth Workshop of the International Network Impact of Empire (Heidelberg, July 5-7, 2007)
This volume presents the proceedings of the eighth workshop of the international network 'Impact of Empire', which concentrates on the history of the Roman Empire and brings together ancient historians, archaeologists, classicists and specialists in Roman law from some thirty European and North American universities. The eighth volume focuses on the impact of the Roman Empire on religious behaviour, with a special focus on the dynamics of ritual. The volume is divided into three sections: ritualising the empire, performing civic community in the empire and performing religion in the empire.
Proceedings of the Ninth Workshop of the International Network Impact of Empire (Durham, 16-19 April 2009)
This volume presents the proceedings of the ninth workshop of the international network ‘Impact of Empire’, which concentrates on the history of the Roman Empire and brings together ancient historians, archaeologists, classicists and specialists on Roman law from some thirty European, North American and Australian universities. This volume focuses on different ways in which the Roman Empire created, changed and influenced (perceptions of) frontiers. The volume is divided into five larger sections: the meaning of 'frontiers', consequences of frontiers, religious frontiers, shifting frontiers and crossing 'frontiers'. In this way, the volume pays attention to different kind of ‘frontiers’ within the Roman Empire, and to their importance for the functioning of the Roman Empire over a longer period of time.
This book deals with changing power and status relations between the highest ranking representatives of Roman imperial power at the central level, in a period when the Empire came under tremendous pressure, AD 193-284. Based on epigraphic, literary and legal materials, the author deals with issues such as the third-century development of emperorship, the shift in power of the senatorial elite and the developing position of senior military officers and other high equestrians. By analyzing the various senior power-holders involved in Roman imperial administration by social rank, this book presents new insights into the diachronic development of imperial administration, appointment policies and socio-political hierarchies between the second and fourth centuries AD.
Proceedings of the Tenth Workshop of the International Network Impact of Empire (Lille, June 23-25, 2011)
Integration in the empire under the political control of the city of Rome, her princeps, and the different authorities in the provinces and cities includes processes of inclusion and exclusion. These multifaceted processes take place at various levels in society and at different places, over a long period of time. In this volume, these processes are analysed and reflected on from different perspectives. Juridical, political, social and religious points of view are articulated, elaborating on epigraphic, literary, juridical and numismatic evidence. Notions of personal and collective identities have been linked to relevant Roman realia, so that various contents of Romanitas can be defined through contextualization.
An End to Unity?
East and West in the Roman Empire of the Fourth Century examines the (dis)unity of the Roman Empire in the fourth century from different angles, in order to offer a broad perspective on the topic and avoid an overvaluation of the political division of the empire in 395.
After a methodological key-paper on the concepts of unity, the other contributors elaborate on these notions from various geo-political perspectives: the role of the army and taxation, geographical perspectives, the unity of the Church and the perception of the divisio regni of 364. Four case-studies follow, illuminating the role of concordia apostolorum, antique sports, eunuchs and the poet Prudentius on the late antique view of the Empire. Despite developments to the contrary, it appears that the Roman Empire remained (to be viewed as) a unity in all strata of society.
Proceedings of the Twelfth Workshop of the International Network Impact of Empire (Rome, June 17-19, 2015)
Following on previous workshops of the Impact of Empire network which looked at frontiers (Impact 9), integration (Impact 10) and the world(s) beyond the borders of the Roman empire (Impact 11), the twelfth meeting of the network focused on movement within the Roman world. The Impact of Mobility and Migration in the Roman Empire assembles a series of papers on key themes in the study of Roman mobility and migration. It discusses legal frameworks, the mobility of the army (both at war and in peace-time), ethnic identity, the mobility of women, the mobility of senators, diplomatic mobility, war-induced mobility, and deportations. The papers vary in geographical scope, ranging from empire-wide approaches to reconstructions of patterns at particular sites. It employs a rich variety of sources, ranging from classical authors to documentary papyri, from legal sources to shipwrecks.
This volume offers an expansive approach to interactions between Romans and those beyond the borders of Rome. The range of papers included here is wide, both in terms of subject matter and with respect to approach. That said, a number of important themes bind the essays. Who is an insider, and who the outsider? How were these categories of person, or identity, fashioned and/or recognized in antiquity? How shall we recognize them now? What are the categories, or standards, for measuring or determining inside and outside in the Roman world? And then, of course, what are the repercussions when inside and outside come into contact? What happens when the outside is in, or the inside out?
From Archaeology to Economic History
In recent years, storage has come to the fore as a central aspect of ancient economies. However studies have hitherto focused on urban and military storage. Although archaeological excavations of rural granaries are numerous, their evidence has yet to be fully taken into account. Such is the ambition of Rural Granaries in Northern Gaul (Sixth Century BCE – Fourth Century CE). Focusing on northern Gaul, this volume starts by discussing at length the possibility of quantifying storage capacities and, through them, agrarian production. Building on this first part, the second half of the book sketches the evolution of rural storage in Gaul from the Iron Age to Late Antiquity, setting firmly archaeological evidence in the historical context of the Roman Empire.