Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for :

  • Historical and Comparative Linguistics & Linguistic Typology x
  • Open accessible content x
  • Primary Language: English x
Clear All

Jane Austen Speaks Norwegian

The Challenges of Literary Translation

Series:

Marie N. Sørbø

What can translations reveal about the global reception of any authorship? In Jane Austen Speaks Norwegian: The Challenges of Literary Translation, Marie Nedregotten Sørbø compares two novels and six translations of them. The discussion is entirely in English, as all Norwegian versions are back-translated. This study therefore lends itself to comparisons with other languages, and aims to fill its place as one component in a worldwide field of research; how Jane Austen is understood and transmitted. Moreover, this book presents a selection of pertinent issues for any translator, including abbreviation and elaboration, style and vocabulary, and censorship. Sørbø gives vivid examples of how literary translation happens, and how it serves to interpret and refashion literature for new readerships.

Tense and Text in Classical Arabic

A Discourse-oriented Study of the Classical Arabic Tense System

Series:

Michal Marmorstein

In Tense and Text in Classical Arabic, Michal Marmorstein presents a new discourse-oriented analysis of the indicative tense system in Classical Arabic. Critical of commonly held assumptions regarding the binary structure of the tense system and the perfect-imperfect asymmetry, the author redefines the discussion by analysing the extended syntactic and textual environments in which the paradigm of the indicative forms is used.The study shows that the function of Classical Arabic tenses is determined by the interaction of their inherent grammatical meaning and the overall dialogic, narrative, or generic contexts in which they occur. It also demonstrates the particularizing effect of context, so that temporal and aspectual meanings are always more nuanced, delicate, and pragmatically motivated in actual discourse.

Preterit Expansion and Perfect Demise in Porteño Spanish and Beyond

A Critical Perspective on Cognitive Grammaticalization Theory

Series:

Guro Fløgstad

In Preterit Expansion and Perfect Demise in Porteño Spanish and Beyond, Guro Nore Fløgstad offers an original account of the way in which the Preterit category has expanded, at the expense of the Perfect, in Porteño Spanish – a variety spoken in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Through primary sources and a large cross-linguistic sample, Fløgstad convincingly shows that the expansion of a Preterit is not rare in the languages of the world. This finding challenges the prevailing view in historical morphosyntax, and especially in usage-based grammaticalization theory, namely the alleged preference for analytic over synthetic forms, and the possibility of prediction based on the source meaning in grammaticalization.

This book is fully available in Open Access.

Series:

Lily Kahn

A Grammar of the Eastern European Hasidic Hebrew Tale provides the first detailed linguistic analysis of the Hebrew narrative literature composed in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Eastern Europe by followers of the Hasidic spiritual movement. It presents a thorough description of Hasidic Hebrew orthography, morphology, syntax, and lexis illustrated with extensive examples. Attention is devoted to the relationship between Hasidic Hebrew and its biblical, rabbinic, and medieval antecedents; to its links with Aramaic, contemporaneous Maskilic Hebrew, and its authors’ native Yiddish; and to its contributions to Modern (Israeli) Hebrew. The grammar fills a major scholarly gap on the diachronic development of Hebrew and as such will be a key resource for anyone interested in the language’s history.

Series:

Bernd Nothofer

The work is concerned with the reconstruction of the phonemes of Proto-Malayo-Javanic, the last proto-language which is directly continued by the Sundanese, Javanese, Malay, and Madurese. Part one contains a lexicostatistical calculation of the degrees of relationship among the four languages and a brief description of the phonology and morphophonemics of each language. Part two is devoted to the reconstruction of Proto-Malayo-Javanic phonemes. It shows inter alia that evidence from Malayo-Javanic languages requires the reconstruction of a number of Proto-Malayo-Javanic phonemes which hitherto have not been reconstructed for proto-languages of higher order or the proto-language of highest order, i.e. Proto-Austronesian. The appendix contains the basic vocabulary lists for the four languages, a map showing previously assumed language boundaries separating Sundanese, Jakarta Malay, Javanese and Madurese, and a revised map showing language boundaries as revealed in the course of the research, as well as Sundanese dialect maps. An index of the Proto-Malayo-Javanic reconstructions follows.