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Vision, Narrative, and Wisdom in the Aramaic Texts from Qumran

Essays from the Copenhagen Symposium, 14-15 August, 2017

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Edited by Mette Bundvad and Kasper Siegismund

The Aramaic Dead Sea Scrolls from Qumran have attracted increasing interest in recent years. These texts predate the “sectarian” Dead Sea scrolls, and they are contemporary with the youngest parts of the Hebrew Bible. They offer a unique glimpse into the situation before the biblical canons were closed. Their highly creative Jewish authors reshaped and rewrote biblical traditions to cope with the concerns of their own time. The essays in this volume examine this fascinating ancient literature from a variety of different perspectives. The book grew out of an international symposium held at the University of Copenhagen in August 2017.

Ancient Manuscripts in Digital Culture

Visualisation, Data Mining, Communication

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Edited by David Hamidović, Claire Clivaz and Sarah Bowen Savant

Ancient Manuscripts in Digital Culture presents an overview of the digital turn in Ancient Jewish and Christian manuscripts visualisation, data mining and communication. Edited by David Hamidović, Claire Clivaz and Sarah Bowen Savant, it gathers together the contributions of seventeen scholars involved in Biblical, Early Jewish and Christian studies. The volume attests to the spreading of digital humanities in these fields and presents fundamental analysis of the rise of visual culture as well as specific test-cases concerning ancient manuscripts. Sophisticated visualisation tools, stylometric analysis, teaching and visual data, epigraphy and visualisation belong notably to the varied overview presented in the volume.

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Lily Kahn

A Grammar of the Eastern European Hasidic Hebrew Tale provides the first detailed linguistic analysis of the Hebrew narrative literature composed in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Eastern Europe by followers of the Hasidic spiritual movement. It presents a thorough description of Hasidic Hebrew orthography, morphology, syntax, and lexis illustrated with extensive examples. Attention is devoted to the relationship between Hasidic Hebrew and its biblical, rabbinic, and medieval antecedents; to its links with Aramaic, contemporaneous Maskilic Hebrew, and its authors’ native Yiddish; and to its contributions to Modern (Israeli) Hebrew. The grammar fills a major scholarly gap on the diachronic development of Hebrew and as such will be a key resource for anyone interested in the language’s history.