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On the Formation of Marxism

Karl Kautsky’s Theory of Capitalism, the Marxism of the Second International and Karl Marx’s Critique of Political Economy

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Jukka Gronow

Karl Kautsky was, for three decades before the First World War, the main authority on the intellectual heritage of Marx and Engels, the founding fathers of Marxism. His interpretation of Marx’s Capital and the basic laws and contradictions of capitalism was the standard reference point for both the foes and allies of Social Democracy. Jukka Gronow’s On the Formation of Marxism analyses Kautsky’s impact on the self-understanding of the European labour movement from his dispute over Revisionism with Eduard Bernstein to his polemics with V.I. Lenin over Imperialism and the Russian Revolution. Despite many political differences, Gronow shows that these authors shared a common understanding of the basic nature of capitalism, which in important respects differed from Marx’s critique of political economy.

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Edited by Steinar A. Sæther

In Expectations Unfulfilled: Norwegian Migrants in Latin America, 1820-1940 scholars from Europe and Latin America study the experiences of workers, sailors, whalers, landowners, intellectuals and investors who migrated from Norway to Latin America during the age of mass migration. One recurrent theme is the absence of a large migratory stream from Norway to Latin America. In relative terms, Norwegian emigration was among the highest in Europe. Latin America was one of the principal receivers of migrants in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Why, then, did so few Norwegians end up in Latin America? Combining different levels of analysis, the authors explain how Norwegians experienced Latin America, and how their experiences were communicated to potential migrants at home.

Contributors are: María Alvarez Solar, Cecilia Alvstad, María Bjerg, Mieke Neyens, Synnøve Ones Rosales, Ricardo Pérez Montfort, Steinar A. Sæther and Ellen Woortmann.

Large-Scale Land Acquisitions

Focus on South-East Asia

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Edited by Christophe Gironde, Christophe Golay and Peter Messerli

Large-scale land acquisitions, or ‘land grabbing’, has become a key research topic among scholars interested in agrarian change, development, and the environment. The term ‘land acquisitions’ refers to a highly contested process in terms of governance and impacts on livelihoods and human rights. This book focuses on South-East Asia. A series of thematic and in-depth case studies put ‘land grabbing’ into specific historical and institutional contexts. The volume also offers a human rights analysis of the phenomenon, examining the potential and limits of human rights mechanisms aimed at preventing and mitigating land grabs' negative consequences.

Education, Learning, Training

Critical Issues for Development

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Edited by Gilles Carbonnier, Michel Carton and Kenneth King

Education: Fundamental human right or strategic tool in support of economic growth? How does commodity-dependence influence education policy and practice? What is the role of vocational training vis-à-vis university education in developing countries? Are MOOCs and Chinese cooperation a game changer for higher education in Africa? And how does student migration sit vis-à-vis the globalisation of knowledge? These and other questions lie at the heart of Education, Learning, Training: Critical Issues for Development, a collection of essays edited by Gilles Carbonnier, Michel Carton and Kenneth King, which explore 50 years of international discourse surrounding education and development. Drawing on examples from Africa, Asia and Latin America, the articles examine issues hitherto largely neglected, but of increasing relevance to researchers and policymakers.