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Edited by Bernard Feltz, Marcus Missal and Andrew Cameron Sims

Neuroscientists often consider free will to be an illusion. Contrary to this hypothesis, the contributions to this volume show that recent developments in neuroscience can also support the existence of free will. Firstly, the possibility of intentional consciousness is studied. Secondly, Libet’s experiments are discussed from this new perspective. Thirdly, the relationship between free will, causality and language is analyzed. This approach suggests that language grants the human brain a possibility to articulate a meaningful personal life. Therefore, human beings can escape strict biological determinism.

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Edited by Masamichi Sasaki

Trust in Contemporary Society, by well-known trust researchers, deals with conceptual, theoretical and social interaction analyses, historical data on societies, national surveys or cross-national comparative studies, and methodological issues related to trust. The authors are from a variety of disciplines: psychology, sociology, political science, organizational studies, history, and philosophy, and from Britain, the United States, the Czech Republic, the Netherlands, Australia, Germany, and Japan. They bring their vast knowledge from different historical and cultural backgrounds to illuminate contemporary issues of trust and distrust. The socio-cultural perspective of trust is important and increasingly acknowledged as central to trust research. Accordingly, future directions for comparative trust research are also discussed.

Contributors include: Jack Barbalet, John Brehm, Geoffrey Hosking, Robert Marsh, Barbara A. Misztal, Guido Möllering, Bart Nooteboom, Ken J. Rotenberg, Jiří Šafr, Masamichi Sasaki, Meg Savel, Markéta Sedláčková, Jörg Sydow, Piotr Sztompka.

Miguel A. Meca, Pilar Drake and Daniel Martin

The polychaete Oxydromus okupa lives in association with the bivalves Scrobicularia plana and Macomopsis pellucida in the intertidal of Río San Pedro (CI = Cádiz Intertidal) and adjacent to CHipiona (CH) harbour, and in the subtidal of the Bay of Cádiz (CS = Cádiz Subtidal). We analyse these populations morphometrically, ecologically (including infestation characteristics) and genetically (intertidal populations, 16S and ITS-1 genes). We consider “host”, “environment” and the combined “host and environment” as possible factors of interpopulation variability. Morphometry revealed three well-defined clusters for CI, CH and CS, showing intergroup phenotypic differences ranging from 35 to 50%. Hosts shell lengths ranged between 26 and 36 mm for S. plana and 20 and 28 mm for M. pellucida. The infestation of small M. pellucida by juvenile O. okupa suggests they show an active size segregation behaviour. The intertidal seems to be less favourable (infestation rate <25% vs. up to 65% in the subtidal), and did not show recent bottleneck events. Overall, CI and CH were genetically homogeneous, but showed a significant divergence (one dominant haplotype in each host species), suggesting host shift as being a soft barrier to gene flow. Most characters related with host-entering varied among populations, suggesting symbiotic behaviour to play a key role in reducing panmixia and leading to the initial phases of a speciation process in sympatric symbiotic populations. Polyxeny and symbiotic behaviour in O. okupa seem thus to be underlying mechanisms contributing to its great phenotypic variety, marked ecological differences, and genetic divergence.

Giacinta Angela Stocchino, Ronald Sluys, Abdel Halim Harrath, Lamjed Mansour and Renata Manconi

Invasions of alien species form one of the major threats to global biodiversity. Among planarian flatworms many species are known to be invasive, in several cases strongly affecting local ecosystems. Therefore, a detailed knowledge on the biology of an invasive species is of utmost importance for understanding the process of invasion, the cause of its success, and the subsequent ecological impact on native species. This paper provides new information on the biology of introduced populations of the freshwater flatworm Girardia tigrina (Girard, 1850) from Europe. This species is a native of the Nearctic Region that was accidentally introduced into Europe in the 1920s. Since then, numerous records across the European continent bear witness of the invasiveness of this species, although only a few studies focused on the biology of the introduced populations. We report on the morphology of sexualized individuals from a fissiparous Italian population, representing the second record of spontaneous sexualization of fissiparous individuals in this species. A detailed morphological account of the reproductive apparatus of these ex-fissiparous animals is presented. Our results increased the number of morphological groups previously recognized for European populations of G. tigrina, thus corroborating the hypothesis on multiple independent introductions to this continent. Karyological results obtained from our fissiparous Italian individuals revealed a constant diploid chromosome complement of sixteen chromosomes. Further, we document the marked intraspecific variation in several morphological features of this species.

Cessa Rauch, Bert W. Hoeksema, Bambang Hermanto and Charles H.J.M. Fransen

Most marine palaemonid shrimp species live in symbiosis with invertebrates of various phyla. These associations range from weak epibiosis to obligatory endosymbiosis and from restricted commensalism to semi-parasitism. On coral reefs, such symbiotic shrimps can contribute to the associated biodiversity of reef corals. Among the host taxa, mushroom corals (Cnidaria: Anthozoa: Fungiidae) are known to harbour various groups of symbionts, including shrimps. Some but not all of these associated species are host-specific. Because data on the host specificity of shrimps on mushroom corals are scarce, shrimp species of the genus Periclimenes were collected from mushroom corals during fieldwork in Lembeh Strait, North Sulawesi, Indonesia. Using molecular (COI barcoding gene) and morphological methods, three species of Periclimenes were identified: P. diversipes, P. watamuae and a species new to science, P. subcorallum sp. nov., described herein. Their host specificity was variable, with eight, three and two fungiid host records, respectively. It is concluded that shrimp species of the genus Periclimenes show much overlap in their host choice and that particular morphological traits in the host species appear to play a more important role than phylogenetic affinities within the host group.

Gerrit Potkamp and Charles H.J.M. Fransen

Over the last century, a large body of literature emerged on mechanisms driving speciation. Most of the research into these questions focussed on terrestrial systems, while research in marine systems lagged behind. Here, we review the population genetic mechanisms and geographic context of 33 potential cases of speciation with gene flow in the marine realm, using six criteria inferred from theoretical models of speciation. Speciation with gene flow occurs in a wide range of marine taxa. Single traits, which induce assortative mating and are subjected to disruptive selection, such as differences in host-associations in invertebrates or colour pattern in tropical fish, are potentially responsible for a decrease in gene flow and may be driving divergence in the majority of cases. However, much remains unknown, and with the current knowledge, the frequency of ecological speciation with gene flow in marine systems remains difficult to estimate. Standardized, generally applicable statistical methods, explicitly testing different hypotheses of speciation, are, going forward, required to confidently infer speciation with gene flow.

Zhen Zhang, Lichao Wang, Jing Liu, Zhaorong Dong, Wei Xu and Shiping Wang

Understanding the reproductive response of host plants to herbivores is important in grazing ecology and grassland management. Simulated grazing experiments were conducted to determine the influence of different grazing intensities on reproductive performance of a shrub, Caragana microphylla Lam. The total leaf mass, total flower mass, total flower mass allocation, and single flower mass allocation decreased with increased grazing intensity. The total spine mass, single flower mass and total spine mass allocation increased with increased grazing intensity. The stem mass, stem mass allocation and total leaf mass allocation had not significant change with the increasing grazing intensity. Under heavy grazing treatments, the host plants significantly decreased their investment in reproduction and increased investment in physical defense organs. Although there were no significant differences in the number of ovules among different grazing intensities, herbivory negatively affected reproductive performance, including the number of flowers, the number of pollen grains per flower, the number of ripe seeds and the rate of pod-set in host plants. These results indicate that there are trade-offs among vegetative and reproductive and defensive organs. Compared with male reproduction, female reproductive performance was less sensitive to herbivory and grazing intensity. Moreover, pollen grains from heavily browsed plants seemed to be less likely to sire pods and ripe seeds than those from unbrowsed plants, indicating that herbivory not only decreased pollen production, but also adversely affected pollen performance.

Jens Christoffer Skogen and Sverre Nesvåg

Sense of time is a fundamental aspect of human psychology. The Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI) is a widely used questionnaire meant to measure fundamental experiential dimensions of time, such as past, present and future. The aim of this study was to establish model fit of a Norwegian extended version of the ZTPI. The study is based on a convenience sample of 713 individuals. Based on previous findings, we employed confirmatory factor analysis and exploratory structural equation modelling to investigate different factor structures of ZTPI. The analyses were carried out using the WLSMV-estimation approach, and several fit indices was used as indicators of how well the data fitted the suggested factor structure. This first investigation of a Norwegian version of ZTPI did not find support for the original 56-item scale, the S-ZTPI version (64 items), nor an extended version that also incorporated the transcendental time perspective (74 items). In post-hoc analyses, we identified a model with 34 items and 7 factors that fitted the data adequately. Further studies should investigate the factor structure of ZTPI in a Norwegian context, and international studies should investigate how the transcendental time perspective relates to the rest of ZTPI.

Piotr Gąsiorek, Daniel Stec, Witold Morek and Łukasz Michalczyk

Isohypsibioidea are most likely the most basally branching evolutionary lineage of eutardigrades. Despite being second largest eutardigrade order, phylogenetic relationships and systematics within this group remain largely unresolved. Broad taxon sampling, especially within one of the most speciose tardigrade genera, Isohypsibius Thulin, 1928, and application of both comparative morphological methods (light contrast and scanning electron microscopy imaging of external morphology and buccal apparatuses) and phylogenetic framework (18S + 28S rRNA sequences) resulted in the most comprehensive study devoted to this order so far. Two new families are erected from the currently recognised family Isohypsibiidae: Doryphoribiidae fam. nov., comprising all aquatic isohypsibioids and some terrestrial isohypsibioid taxa equipped with the ventral lamina; and Halobiotidae fam. nov., secondarily marine eutardigrades with unique adaptations to sea environment. We also split Isohypsibius into four genera to accommodate phylogenetic, morphological and ecological variation within the genus: terrestrial Isohypsibius s.s. (Isohypsibiidae), with smooth or sculptured cuticle but without gibbosities; terrestrial Dianea gen. nov. (Isohypsibiidae), with small and pointy gibbosities; terrestrial Ursulinius gen. nov. (Isohypsibiidae), with large and rounded gibbosities; and aquatic Grevenius gen. nov. (Doryphoribiidae fam. nov.), typically with rough cuticle and claws with branches of very similar heigths. Claw morphology is reviewed and, for the first time, shown to encompass a number of morphotypes that correlate with clades recovered in the molecular analysis. The anatomy of pharynx and cuticle are also shown to be of high value in distinguishing supraspecific taxa in Isohypsibioidea. Taxonomy of all isohypsibioid families and genera is discussed, with special emphasis on the newly erected entities. Finally, a dychotomous diagnostic key to all currently recognised isohypsibioid families and genera is provided.

Bernhard A. Huber and Anne Chao

Ratio-like approaches for estimating global species richness have been criticised for their unjustified extrapolation from regional to global patterns. Here we explore the use of cumulative percentages of ‘new’ (i.e., not formally described) species over large geographic areas (‘megatransects’) as a means to overcome this problem. In addition, we take into account undetected species and illustrate these combined methods by applying them to a family of spiders (Pholcidae) that currently contains some 1,700 described species. The raw global cumulative percentage of new species (‘new’ as of the end of 2008, when 1,001 species were formally described) is 75.1%, and is relatively constant across large biogeographic regions. Undetected species are estimated using the Chao2 estimator based on species incidence data (date by species and locality by species matrices). The estimated percentage of new species based on the date by species matrices is 76.0% with an estimated standard error (s.e.) of 2.6%. This leads to an estimated global species richness of about 4,200 with a 95% confidence interval of (3,300, 5,000). The corresponding values based on locality by species matrices are 84.2% (s.e. 3.0%) and 6,300 with a 95% confidence interval of (4,000, 8,600). Our results suggest that the currently known 1,700 species of Pholcidae may represent no more than about 25–40% of the total species richness. The impact of further biasing factors like geography, species size and distribution, cryptic species, and model assumptions needs to be explored.