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Editor: Roald Dijkstra
The apostle Peter gradually became one of the most famous figures of the ancient world. His almost undisputed reputation made the disciple an exquisite anchor by which new practices within and outside the Church could be established, including innovations in fields as diverse as architecture, art, cult, epigraphy, liturgy, poetry and politics. This interdisciplinary volume inquires the way in which the figure of Peter functioned as an anchor for various people from different periods and geographical areas. The concept of Anchoring Innovation is used to investigate the history of the reception of the apostle Peter from the first century up to Charlemagne, revealing as much about Peter as about the context in which this reception took place.
New Perspectives on Power and Political Representation from Ancient History to the Present Day offers a unique perspective on political communication between rulers and ruled from antiquity to the present day by putting the concept of representation center stage. It explores the dynamic relationship between elites and the people as it was shaped by constructions of self-representation and representative claims. The contributors to this volume – specialists in ancient, medieval, early-modern and modern history – move away from reductionist associations of political representation with formal aspects of modern, democratic, electoral, and parliamentarian politics. Instead, they contend that the construction of political representation involves a set of discourses, practices, and mechanisms that, although they have been applied and appropriated in various ways in a range of historical contexts, has stood the test of time.
Proceedings of the Thirteenth Workshop of the International Network Impact of Empire (Gent, June 21-24, 2017)
The Impact of Justice on the Roman Empire discusses ways in which notions, practice and the ideology of justice impacted on the functioning of the Roman Empire. The papers assembled in this volume follow from the thirteenth workshop of the international network Impact of Empire. They focus on what was considered just in various groups of Roman subjects, how these views were legitimated, shifted over time, and how they affected policy making and political, administrative, and judicial practices. Linking all of the papers are three common themes: the emperor and justice, justice in a dispersed empire and differentiation of justice.
In recent years, storage has come to the fore as a central aspect of ancient economies. However studies have hitherto focused on urban and military storage. Although archaeological excavations of rural granaries are numerous, their evidence has yet to be fully taken into account. Such is the ambition of Rural Granaries in Northern Gaul (Sixth Century BCE – Fourth Century CE). Focusing on northern Gaul, this volume starts by discussing at length the possibility of quantifying storage capacities and, through them, agrarian production. Building on this first part, the second half of the book sketches the evolution of rural storage in Gaul from the Iron Age to Late Antiquity, setting firmly archaeological evidence in the historical context of the Roman Empire.
Editor: Caroline Petit
This collective volume arises from a Wellcome-funded conference held at the University of Warwick in 2014 about the “new” Galen discovered in 2005 in a Greek manuscript, De indolentia. In the wake of the latest English translation published by Vivian Nutton in 2013, this book offers a multi-disciplinary approach to the new text, discussing in turn issues around Galen’s literary production, his medical and philosophical contribution to the theme of avoiding distress (ἀλυπία), controversial topics in Roman history such as the Antonine plague and the reign of Commodus, and finally the reception of the text in the Islamic world. Gathering eleven contributions by recognised specialists of Galen, Greek literature and Roman history, it revisits the new text extensively.
Proceedings of the Twelfth Workshop of the International Network Impact of Empire (Rome, June 17-19, 2015)
Following on previous workshops of the Impact of Empire network which looked at frontiers (Impact 9), integration (Impact 10) and the world(s) beyond the borders of the Roman empire (Impact 11), the twelfth meeting of the network focused on movement within the Roman world. The Impact of Mobility and Migration in the Roman Empire assembles a series of papers on key themes in the study of Roman mobility and migration. It discusses legal frameworks, the mobility of the army (both at war and in peace-time), ethnic identity, the mobility of women, the mobility of senators, diplomatic mobility, war-induced mobility, and deportations. The papers vary in geographical scope, ranging from empire-wide approaches to reconstructions of patterns at particular sites. It employs a rich variety of sources, ranging from classical authors to documentary papyri, from legal sources to shipwrecks.
This volume offers an expansive approach to interactions between Romans and those beyond the borders of Rome. The range of papers included here is wide, both in terms of subject matter and with respect to approach. That said, a number of important themes bind the essays. Who is an insider, and who the outsider? How were these categories of person, or identity, fashioned and/or recognized in antiquity? How shall we recognize them now? What are the categories, or standards, for measuring or determining inside and outside in the Roman world? And then, of course, what are the repercussions when inside and outside come into contact? What happens when the outside is in, or the inside out?
East and West in the Roman Empire of the Fourth Century examines the (dis)unity of the Roman Empire in the fourth century from different angles, in order to offer a broad perspective on the topic and avoid an overvaluation of the political division of the empire in 395.
After a methodological key-paper on the concepts of unity, the other contributors elaborate on these notions from various geo-political perspectives: the role of the army and taxation, geographical perspectives, the unity of the Church and the perception of the divisio regni of 364. Four case-studies follow, illuminating the role of concordia apostolorum, antique sports, eunuchs and the poet Prudentius on the late antique view of the Empire. Despite developments to the contrary, it appears that the Roman Empire remained (to be viewed as) a unity in all strata of society.
Proceedings of the Tenth Workshop of the International Network Impact of Empire (Lille, June 23-25, 2011)
Integration in the empire under the political control of the city of Rome, her princeps, and the different authorities in the provinces and cities includes processes of inclusion and exclusion. These multifaceted processes take place at various levels in society and at different places, over a long period of time. In this volume, these processes are analysed and reflected on from different perspectives. Juridical, political, social and religious points of view are articulated, elaborating on epigraphic, literary, juridical and numismatic evidence. Notions of personal and collective identities have been linked to relevant Roman realia, so that various contents of Romanitas can be defined through contextualization.
Proceedings of the Ninth Workshop of the International Network Impact of Empire (Durham, 16-19 April 2009)
This volume presents the proceedings of the ninth workshop of the international network ‘Impact of Empire’, which concentrates on the history of the Roman Empire and brings together ancient historians, archaeologists, classicists and specialists on Roman law from some thirty European, North American and Australian universities. This volume focuses on different ways in which the Roman Empire created, changed and influenced (perceptions of) frontiers. The volume is divided into five larger sections: the meaning of 'frontiers', consequences of frontiers, religious frontiers, shifting frontiers and crossing 'frontiers'. In this way, the volume pays attention to different kind of ‘frontiers’ within the Roman Empire, and to their importance for the functioning of the Roman Empire over a longer period of time.