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The 12th volume of International Development Policy explores the relationship between international drug policy and development goals, both current and within a historical perspective. Contributions address the drugs and development nexus from a range of critical viewpoints, highlighting gaps and contradictions, as well as exploring strategies and opportunities for enhanced linkages between drug control and development programming. Criminalisation and coercive law enforcement-based responses in international and national level drug control are shown to undermine peace, security and development objectives.

Contributors include: Kenza Afsahi, Damon Barrett, David Bewley-Taylor, Daniel Brombacher, Julia Buxton, Mary Chinery-Hesse, John Collins, Joanne Csete, Sarah David, Ann Fordham, Corina Giacomello, Martin Jelsma, Sylvia Kay, Diederik Lohman, David Mansfield, José Ramos-Horta, Tuesday Reitano, Andrew Scheibe, Shaun Shelly, Khalid Tinasti, and Anna Versfeld.
الأخلاق الإسلامية ونسق الائتمانية: مقاربات في فلسفة طه عبد الرحمن
Islamic Ethics and the Trusteeship Paradigm explores the emerging ethical theory of the trusteeship paradigm as developed by the Moroccan philosopher Taha Abderrahmane (b. 1944). The volume, with contributions in English and Arabic, examines the development of this modern Islamic theory of ethics and how it permeates various disciplines: philosophy, theology, legal theory, moral theory, sociology and anthropology, communication, environment and biomedical ethics. The trusteeship paradigm aims to make ethics the compass of human thinking and action in order to overcome the predicaments humanity faces and realize a more just and balanced world. This makes of it one of the principal and profound ethical theories in Islamic scholarship that engages both classical and modern thought.

Contributors: Mutaz al-Khatib, Mostafa Amakdouf, Mohamed Amine Brahimi, Assia Chekireb, Abdelmounim Choqairi, Issam Eido, Hicham El Makki, Amin El-Yousfi, Adil Et-Tahiri, Ramon Harvey, Mohammed Hashas, Eva Kepplinger, Mohamed Ourya, Harald Viersen.

يدرس كتاب الأخلاق الإسلامية ونسق الائتمانية الفلسفة الأخلاقية للفيلسوف المغربي طه عبد الرحمن (و. 1944م)، والتي بدأ الاشتغال عليها منذ أواخر سبعينيات القرن الماضي. يضم الكتاب مساهمات باللغتين العربية والإنجليزية تعالج تطور النظرية وتطبيقاتها وحدودها في المجالات الآتية: الفلسفة وتاريخ الأفكار، وفلسفة الدين وعلم اللاهوت، والتشريع والفقه، والتصوف، والأخلاق، والسوسيولوجيا والأنثروبولوجيا، وعلم التواصل والبيئة، والأخلاق الطبية. يحاول نسق الائتمانية جعل الأخلاق روح الفعل والقول الإنساني بدلاً من الاكتفاء بالعقل المجرد الذي يُفقد الوجود الإنساني جوهرانيته الأخلاقية. وبهذا يُعتبر نسق الائتمانية واحدا من أهم المدارس الفكرية التي تساهم في فتح أفق فكري إنساني أرحب انطلاقًا من الأخلاقية الإسلامية وروحها العقلانية النقدية.

المساهمون: مصطفى أمقدوف، محمد أوريا، محمد أمين البراهمي، محمد حصحاص، معتز الخطيب، عبد المنعم الشقيري، آسيا شكيرب، عادل الطاهري، عصام عيدو، هارالد فيرسن، إيفا كابلينغر، هشام المكي، رامون هارفي، أمين اليوسفي.
Humanitarianism: Keywords is a comprehensive dictionary designed as a compass for navigating the conceptual universe of humanitarianism. It is an intuitive toolkit to map contemporary humanitarianism and to explore its current and future articulations. The dictionary serves a broad readership of practitioners, students, and researchers by providing informed access to the extensive humanitarian vocabulary.
Karl Kautsky’s Theory of Capitalism, the Marxism of the Second International and Karl Marx’s Critique of Political Economy
Author: Jukka Gronow
Karl Kautsky was, for three decades before the First World War, the main authority on the intellectual heritage of Marx and Engels, the founding fathers of Marxism. His interpretation of Marx’s Capital and the basic laws and contradictions of capitalism was the standard reference point for both the foes and allies of Social Democracy. Jukka Gronow’s On the Formation of Marxism analyses Kautsky’s impact on the self-understanding of the European labour movement from his dispute over Revisionism with Eduard Bernstein to his polemics with V.I. Lenin over Imperialism and the Russian Revolution. Despite many political differences, Gronow shows that these authors shared a common understanding of the basic nature of capitalism, which in important respects differed from Marx’s critique of political economy.
In Expectations Unfulfilled: Norwegian Migrants in Latin America, 1820-1940 scholars from Europe and Latin America study the experiences of workers, sailors, whalers, landowners, intellectuals and investors who migrated from Norway to Latin America during the age of mass migration. One recurrent theme is the absence of a large migratory stream from Norway to Latin America. In relative terms, Norwegian emigration was among the highest in Europe. Latin America was one of the principal receivers of migrants in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Why, then, did so few Norwegians end up in Latin America? Combining different levels of analysis, the authors explain how Norwegians experienced Latin America, and how their experiences were communicated to potential migrants at home.

Contributors are: María Alvarez Solar, Cecilia Alvstad, María Bjerg, Mieke Neyens, Synnøve Ones Rosales, Ricardo Pérez Montfort, Steinar A. Sæther and Ellen Woortmann.
Large-scale land acquisitions, or ‘land grabbing’, has become a key research topic among scholars interested in agrarian change, development, and the environment. The term ‘land acquisitions’ refers to a highly contested process in terms of governance and impacts on livelihoods and human rights. This book focuses on South-East Asia. A series of thematic and in-depth case studies put ‘land grabbing’ into specific historical and institutional contexts. The volume also offers a human rights analysis of the phenomenon, examining the potential and limits of human rights mechanisms aimed at preventing and mitigating land grabs' negative consequences.

Contributors include: Maria Lisa Alano, Ioana Cismas, Olivier De Schutter, Michael Dwyer, Christophe Gironde, Christophe Golay, Andreas Heinimann, Martin Keulertz, Marcel Mazoyer, Peter Messerli, Hafiz Mirza, Vong Nanhthavong, Gerben Nooteboom, Patricia Paramita, Amaury Peeters, Emily Polack, Laurence Roudart, Oliver Schoenweger, Gilda Senties, Sokbunthoeun So, Mohamad Shohibuddin, William Speller, Eckart Woertz, and James Zhan.
Education: Fundamental human right or strategic tool in support of economic growth? How does commodity-dependence influence education policy and practice? What is the role of vocational training vis-à-vis university education in developing countries? Are MOOCs and Chinese cooperation a game changer for higher education in Africa? And how does student migration sit vis-à-vis the globalisation of knowledge? These and other questions lie at the heart of Education, Learning, Training: Critical Issues for Development, a collection of essays edited by Gilles Carbonnier, Michel Carton and Kenneth King, which explore 50 years of international discourse surrounding education and development. Drawing on examples from Africa, Asia and Latin America, the articles examine issues hitherto largely neglected, but of increasing relevance to researchers and policymakers.

Contributors include: Patrick Aebischer, Manzoor Ahmed, Fritz Brugger, Nicholas Burnett, Gilles Carbonnier, Michel Carton, Alexandra Draxler, Denise Efionayi, Gérard Escher, Ana García de Fanelli, Claudia Jacinto, Kenneth King, Kathlen Lizárraga Zamora, Simon McGrath, Dimitrios Noukakis, Etienne Piguet, and Lesley Powell.
Platform for Alternatives Methodologies
Bridging Humanities – Platform for Alternatives Methodologies is a peer reviewed, interdisciplinary and multi-area online publication. The scope of Bridging Humanities is to publish original projects that include visuals and other kinds of digital sources as an integral part of the publication. Bridging Humanities includes original research from the humanities intended as an open field that is connected with other disciplines. Each publication is an interactive online space in which text and visuals are used as sources to produce and present knowledge from their field. Using this new format, Bridging Humanities encourages researchers to experiment with new methodologies for publication in which the importance of the digital is recognized as an integral part of the publication and research process. The website publishes at least one new project per year and is hosted externally: www.bridginghumanities.com

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Editor-in-Chief: Roger Slee
The Journal of Disability Studies in Education (JDSE) is an interdisciplinary journal that focuses upon the experiences and outcomes of people with disabilities in education. JDSE focuses upon the overt and covert barriers to access to, and presence, participation and success in education for people with disabilities. JDSE will therefore examine the architecture and cultures of education across all sectors: early childhood education; elementary education; secondary education; higher education; vocational training and informal and alternative education provision.

This is a fully Open Access journal, which means that all articles are freely available online, ensuring maximum, worldwide dissemination of content, in exchange for an Article Publication Charge.

As the journal receives a subvention for publication from the University of South Australia the Article Publication Charge is waived. For more information visit the Brill Open dedicated webpage.

JDSE will publish 8 - 10 papers per volume per year. At the end of each volume, the papers will be published as a monograph for purchase. The papers will be published online at regular intervals to maintain the journal’s impact. Manuscripts will be subject to a rigorous anonymous peer review process.

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The journal is devoted to studies of ancient languages and civilizations of the Old World, defined as Asia, Africa, and Europe. The journal will take a comparative and interdisciplinary approach. In addition to general articles, the journal will contain virtual special issues consisting of articles on a specific topic digitally linked to each other. Antiquity is usually defined in the West as the period between prehistory and the fall of the Western Roman Empire in the 5th century AD. Old World, however, takes a less restrictive approach, to avoid having to exclude the discussion of important developments in Asia, where antiquity is generally considered to continue for much longer, until that major impact of contact with Western civilization in the 16th century. The golden age of the Muslim world, for example, corresponds to what is considered to be the ‘dark age’ or the ‘Middle Age’ in Europe. The journal therefore aims to offer a more comprehensive and flexible perspective on civilizations developed in pre-modern times, by adopting a broader chronological span. A broadest disciplinary coverage will be maintained, to include linguistics, philology, history, archeology, art, architecture, literature, philosophy, religion studies, sociology, anthropology, and other fields of the humanities and social sciences. Scholarly reviews of books are also welcomed.

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