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The role of English as a medium of communication especially in the academic domain has been accelerated. This is reflected in the growing number of English language academic journals in non-English dominant countries such as: China, India and Spain (Ren and Rousseau 2004; Xian 2006). Similar to other peripheral countries, Thailand is no exception. This situation results in competition between the national language and English. This present study compares the language choice of academic papers published in Thai national journals in two major fields: science, and its counterpart, humanities and social science. The data collection includes a corpus of 663 articles published in 2005 and in 2015, specifically 346 from Science and 317 from Humanities and Social science. We have hypothesized that English plays a more significant role in scientific journals compared to those in Humanities and Social science. In addition to the language choice in Thai academic journals, a questionnaire was also distributed to 73 respondents to investigate the language ideology of Thai scholars in choosing a language for their manuscripts. The result reveals that many Thai scholars choose English in writing manuscripts due to the lack of technical terms in their field in Thai whereas some of them prefer Thai due to the publication process and the Thai readership orientation.

In: Manusya: Journal of Humanities

This paper discusses the ways Thai teacher trainees of English conceptualize their language choices inside the classroom, the affordances and constraints this creates for their learning and how it affects their identifications as teacher trainees. Drawing on data from a longitudinal ethnographic study in central Thailand, this paper describes how language choice functions as a ‘technology of talk’ (Jones 2016) that creates both affordances and constraints for our social interaction and the ways our identity is negotiated in social interaction in the classroom. It demonstrates that language choice, in societies in which our literacy practices are increasingly mediated by digital technology, is not only conceptualized through discourses on the situated appropriateness of literacy practices in the classroom, but also influenced by an extended network of digital literacy practices students engage outside the classroom. These digital literacy practices afford new ways of expressing, doing and saying in languages that are otherwise scarcely accessible outside the classroom. Engaging in these practices constructs networks of widely dispersed literacy practices forming intricate nodes between both online and offline sites and gradually permeate traditionally bounded spaces such as the classroom.

In: Manusya: Journal of Humanities

When learning a foreign language, it is important to learn how to spell accurately as it is crucial for communication. To spell Thai language accurately is challenging for both native and foreign learners of Thai. However, studies that address spelling errors made by foreign learners of Thai are rare. The purpose of this paper is to analyze patterns and causes behind spelling errors made by Chinese students learning Thai as a foreign language. Data was taken from thirty Chinese students who took part in a Thai language composition writing and dictation task. The results suggest that the main spelling problem for Chinese students is spelling Thai vowels (37.5%), followed by initial consonants (20.7%), final consonants (20.4%), unpronounced letters (18.0%), tone markers (2.2%), and others (1.2%). In terms of underlying causes of spelling errors, irregularities in Thai language and interference from Chinese phonology are the two main causes for their spelling errors. Moreover, carelessness, differences between the Chinese and Thai writing systems, and influence from Thai native speakers also account for some of the spelling errors produced among the Chinese students.

In: Manusya: Journal of Humanities

The purpose of the present study is to examine language choice on the radio in asean countries. The focus is on English and national languages, the two most important languages in those countries. A review of related past studies did not provide an answer to the question that we were interested in; i.e., which language is chosen for radio broadcasts in asean countries between the national language, which is the language most people understand and signifies national identity, and English, which is the lingua franca of the region and an international language? Data was taken from a sample of programs broadcast by radio stations in the ten asean countries. The results show that Singapore ranks the highest in using English in broadcasting (50% of all the programs), while Laos, Cambodia, Myanmar and Vietnam rank the lowest in using English (0%) but highest in using their national languages (100%). Code-switching between the countries’ national languages and English is found in five countries listed from highest to lowest as: the Philippines, Singapore, Brunei, Indonesia and Thailand. Code-switching is absent in Malaysia, Myanmar, Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam. We conclude that despite the importance of English in the asean community, most asean countries prefer to use their national languages in radio broadcasting.

In: Manusya: Journal of Humanities

This paper reports on an analysis of environmental discourse, or green discourse, in the linguistic and geosemiotic landscape of a Thai university. The overwhelming majority of green discourse signs at the university are in English and where they are bilingual (Thai and English), they tend to contain English in the preferred position. The language usage on the signage is also shown to be related to the sociolinguistics of globalization (Blommaert 2010) in terms of scale, indexical order, and polycentricity. These data are triangulated with data collected from walking interviews with students. The literature on ecolinguistics, the ecology of language and green discourse are reviewed within the context of the present study. The analysis focuses upon the geosemiotics (Scollon and Scollon 2003) of green discourse and how such discourse reflects patterns of the sociolinguistics of globalization.

In: Manusya: Journal of Humanities

Nietzsche influenced Strauss throughout the composer’s mature career, from Also sprach Zarathustra, Op. 30 (1896), which shares the same name as the treatise by Nietzsche, to Eine Alpensinfonie, Op. 64 (1911–15), which initially bore the title Der Antichrist, after Nietzsche’s 1888 essay. Nietzsche, through Zarathustra, stresses the idea of the Übermensch, which proposes that the human occupies the stratum between the primal and the super-human. The Übermensch is not, however, the zenith for a man. The goal for man is rather his journey toward self-overcoming, his struggle within himself. In Ein Heldenleben (A Hero’s Life, 1898), Strauss incorporates Nietzschean concepts without any direct references to Nietzsche. The designation of a man as a hero, the battle as an obstacle with which one struggles, the alternation between peace and war and the cycle of recurrence in this tone poem all reflect Nietzsche’s ideas. This research considers the tone poem from a hermeneutical perspective and argues that Strauss’s hero in Ein Heldenleben embodies qualities encompassing the true Nietzschean hero.

In: Manusya: Journal of Humanities

This research on the images of Thai women in a magazine for older adults aims to analyze the structure and components of interview columns and examines the linguistic strategies used to present images of Thai women within the context of a magazine for older adults by associating textual analysis with visual methodology. The data collection in this research was grounded on O-lunla magazine, a magazine targeting people in their 60s and older. Twenty-two interview columns from ten magazine issues from January 2017 to October 2017 were included. The study discloses how this magazine for older adults defines the meaning of ageing and the role of the magazine in passing particular notions about desirable ageing and images of older women in Thai society through the use of linguistic strategies, as well as emphasizing the concepts of desirable ageing for women. The results with regard to the content reveal that the meanings of ageing and the images of Thai women in their older age in this magazine for older adults are formed in a positive way. That is to say, older women are depicted as archetypes of a pleasant life in terms of happiness, work and health.

In: Manusya: Journal of Humanities
In: Manusya: Journal of Humanities