Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 64 items for :

  • New Testament & Early Christian Writings x
  • Open accessible content x
Clear All
The four kingdoms motif enabled writers of various cultures, times, and places, to periodize history as the staged succession of empires barrelling towards an utopian age. The motif provided order to lived experiences under empire (the present), in view of ancestral traditions and cultural heritage (the past), and inspired outlooks assuring hope, deliverance, and restoration (the future). Four Kingdoms Motifs Before and Beyond the Book of Daniel includes thirteen essays that explore the reach and redeployment of the motif in classical and ancient Near Eastern writings, Jewish and Christian scriptures, texts among the Dead Sea Scrolls, Apocrypha and pseudepigrapha, depictions in European architecture and cartography, as well as patristic, rabbinic, Islamic, and African writings from antiquity through the Mediaeval eras.

Abstract

It is well known that the eighteenth-century classical scholar Richard Bentley once announced but never finished an ambitious project for a critical NT edition. What is less well known is that numerous entries of his archive have been preserved in Wren Library of Trinity College (TCL), Cambridge, until today. This article provides some prolegomena to a comprehensive enquiry into Bentley’s unfinished NT project. It includes an updated summary of the archive, relevant secondary literature, a few examples for illustration, and on the basis of all this, some suggestions for future study.

In: Novum Testamentum
Author: Niko Huttunen
In Early Christians Adapting to the Roman Empire: Mutual Recognition Niko Huttunen challenges the interpretation of early Christian texts as anti-imperial documents. He presents examples of the positive relationship between early Christians and the Roman society. With the concept of “recognition” Huttunen describes a situation in which the parties can come to terms with each other without full agreement. Huttunen provides examples of non-Christian philosophers recognizing early Christians. He claims that recognition was a response to Christians who presented themselves as philosophers. Huttunen reads Romans 13 as a part of the ancient tradition of the law of the stronger. His pioneering study on early Christian soldiers uncovers the practical dimension of recognizing the empire.
In: Early Christians Adapting to the Roman Empire
In: Early Christians Adapting to the Roman Empire
In: Early Christians Adapting to the Roman Empire
In: Early Christians Adapting to the Roman Empire
In: Early Christians Adapting to the Roman Empire
Eine Studie zur kulturellen Positionierung des Apostels der Völker
Paulus als interkultureller Vermittler: Wie der Jude Paulus als Christusgläubiger sein Evangelium unter den Menschen aus den Völkern verbreitete. Der als Jude geborene Apostel Paulus sah sich berufen, das Evangelium der Auferstehung Christi unter den Völkern zu vermitteln. Die vorliegende kulturwissenschaftlich geprägte Studie zeigt auf, dass und in welcher Weise Paulus seine bikulturelle Persönlichkeit einsetzte, um die Menschen aus den Völkern für seine Version des Evangeliums von Jesus Christus zu gewinnen. Im Fokus der Untersuchung zu Paulus als Vermittler in einem Kulturtransfergeschehen stehen die paulinischen Selbstbeschreibungen, insbesondere deren „Spitzensätze“ (1 Kor 9,19–23) sowie als beispielhafte Manifestation seiner Adaptabilität die Selbstdarstellung als Wettkämpfer (1 Kor 9,24–27).