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Manuel Lomas

The development of the Spanish Navy in the early modern Mediterranean triggered a change in the balance of political and economic power for the coastal populations of the Hispanic Monarchy. The establishment of new permanent squadrons, endowed with very broad jurisdictional powers, was the cause of many conflicts with the local authorities and had a direct influence on the economic and production activities of the region. Manuel Lomas analyzes the progressive consolidation of these institutions in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, their influence on the mechanisms of justice and commerce, and how they contributed to the reconfiguration of the jurisdictional system that governed the maritime trade in the Mediterranean.

Visions of Justice

Sharīʿa and Cultural Change in Russian Central Asia

Series:

Paolo Sartori

Visions of Justice offers an exploration of legal consciousness among the Muslim communities of Central Asia from the end of the eighteenth century through the fall of the Russian Empire. Paolo Sartori surveys how colonialism affected the way in which Muslims formulated their convictions about entitlements and became exposed to different notions of morality. Situating his work within a range of debates about colonialism and law, legal pluralism, and subaltern subjectivity, Sartori puts the study of Central Asia on a broad, conceptually sophisticated, comparative footing. Drawing from a wealth of Arabic, Persian, Turkic and Russian sources, this book provides a thoughtful critique of method and considers some of the contrasting ways in which material from Central Asian archives may most usefully be read.

This title is available in its entirety in Open Access.
Publication in Open Access was made possible by a grant from the Volkswagen Foundation.

The Spanish Monarchy and the Creation of the Viceroyalty of New Granada (1717-1739)

The Politics of Early Bourbon Reform in Spain and Spanish America

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Francisco A. Eissa-Barroso

Francisco A. Eissa-Barroso’s The Spanish Monarchy and the Creation of the Viceroyalty of New Granada (1717-1739) argues that the pace and character of the most salient Bourbon reform introduced in Spanish America in the early eighteenth century were determined by relations between New Granadan elites and authorities in Spain, reflected changes in European geopolitical configurations, and echoed the aims behind innovation in the Iberian Peninsula. At the same time, the book stresses the hierarchical and asymmetrical nature of interactions across the empire and the importance of changes affecting the central administration of the monarchy. Voices from across the Spanish world reached Madrid but were often manipulated to the benefit of competing factions at court.

Series:

Joanna Carraway Vitiello

In Public Justice and the Criminal Trial in Late Medieval Italy: Reggio Emilia in the Visconti Age, Joanna Carraway Vitiello examines the criminal trial at the end of the fourteenth century. Inquisition procedure, in which a powerful judge largely controlled the trial process, was in regular use in the criminal court at Reggio. Yet during the period considered in this study, technical procedural developments combined with the political realities of the town to create a system of justice that prosecuted crime but also encouraged dispute resolution. Following the stages of the process, including investigation, denunciation, the weighing of evidence, and the verdict, this study investigates the court’s complex role as a vehicle for both personal justice and prosecution in the public interest.

Ports, Piracy and Maritime War

Piracy in the English Channel and the Atlantic, c. 1280-c. 1330

Series:

Thomas Heebøll-Holm

In Ports, Piracy, and Maritime War Thomas K. Heebøll-Holm presents a study of maritime predation in English and French waters around the year 1300. Following Cicero, pirates have traditionally been cast as especially depraved robbers and the enemy of all, but Heebøll-Holm shows that piracy was often part of private wars between English, French, and Gascon ports and mariners, occupying a liminal space between crime and warfare. Furthermore he shows how piracy was an integral part of maritime commerce and how the adjudication of piracy followed the legal procedure of the march. Heebøll-Holm convincingly demonstrates how piracy influenced the policies of the English and the French kings and he contributes to our understanding of Anglo-French relations on the eve of the Hundred Years’ War.