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Bilingual Europe

Latin and Vernacular Cultures - Examples of Bilingualism and Multilingualism c. 1300-1800

Series:

Jan Bloemendal

Bilingual Europe presents to the reader a Europe that for a long time was ‘multilingual’: besides the vernacular languages Latin played an important role. Even ‘nationalistic’ treatises could be written in Latin. Until deep into the 18th century scientific works were written in it. It is still an official language of the Roman Catholic Church. But why did authors choose for Latin or for their native tongue? In the case of bilingual authors, what made them choose either language, and what implications did that have? What interactions existed between the two?

Contributors include Jan Bloemendal, Wiep van Bunge, H. Floris Cohen, Arjan C. van Dixhoorn, Guillaume van Gemert, Joep T. Leerssen, Ingrid Rowland, Arie Schippers, Eva Del Soldato, Demmy Verbeke, Françoise Waquet, and Ari H. Wesseling†.

In and Out of Suriname

Language, Mobility and Identity

Series:

Edited by Eithne B. Carlin, Isabelle Léglise, Bettina Migge and Paul B. Tjon Sie Fat

In and Out of Suriname: Language, Mobility and Identity offers a unique multidisciplinary perspective on a multilingual society in the Caribbean and Guianan sphere. Breaking away from the view of bounded ethnicity, the authors address central theoretical issues of multilingual and multicultural societies including ethnicity as a social distinction, identity as the shifting construction of the self and others, and the role of language therein. They discuss the impact of contact and mobilities on language maintenance, expansion and change. Language, mobility and identity in Suriname are observed through the lens of the actors themselves, from the ever-mobile Amerindians and Maroons on the periphery of land and society through expanding urban societies enhanced by recent migration from Haiti, Brazil and China.

Series:

Rudolf de Jong

After publishing A Grammar of the Bedouin Dialects of the Northern Sinai Littoral: Bridging the Linguistic Gap between the Eastern and Western Arab World (Brill:2000), Rudolf de Jong completes his description of the Bedouin dialects of the Sinai Desert of Egypt by adding the present volume. To facilitate direct comparison of all Sinai dialects, the dialect descriptions in both volumes run parallel and are thus structured in the same manner. Quoting from his own extensive material and using a total of 95 criteria for comparison, De Jong applies the method of 'multi-dimensional scaling' and his own 'step-method' to arrive at a subdivision into eight (of which seven are 'Bedouin') typological groups in Sinai. An appendix with 68 maps and dialectrometrical plots completes the picture.