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Otto Bauer (1881-1938)

Thinker and Politician

Series:

Ewa Czerwińska-Schupp

This work depicts Otto Bauer as the main politician of the SDAP and attempts a critical-analytical interpretation of his socio-political theories, which are shown against the background of the debates within the First and Second Internationals, political events within the SDAP, the international workers’ movement, and the socio-historical processes in Austria and Europe at the time. The book emphasises Bauer’s analyses, philosophical and historiosophical arguments, his theories of imperialism and the national question, his deliberations on possible ways to socialism, the war question, and fascism, as well as his political activity. Otto Bauer (1881-1938) is also a treatise of the ideological, intellectual, cultural and political movement shaped by Bauer: Austromarxism.

First published in German by Peter Lang as Otto Bauer: Studien zur social-politischen Philosophie, Frankfurt, 2005.

Stateless Citizenship

The Palestinian-Arab Citizens of Israel

Series:

Shourideh C. Molavi

Far from integration into the Israeli incorporation regime, Palestinians inside the state are today placed in a paradoxical situation where, as Arab citizens of a Jewish state, they are both inside and outside, host and guest, citizen and stateless. Through the paradigm of stateless citizenship, Shourideh C. Molavi examines the dynamics of exclusion of Palestinian citizens and analytically frames the mechanisms through which their statelessness is maintained. With this she centres our analytical gaze on the paradox that it is through the actual provision of Israeli citizenship that Palestinians are deemed stateless. Molavi critically engages with the liberal variant of Zionist thought, and deconstructs discourse around minority rights and liberal citizenship in the context of Israel's racialized ideological and political makeup.

Corruption as an Empty Signifier

Politics and Political Order in Africa

Series:

Lucy Koechlin

Corruption as an Empty Signifier critically explores the ways in which corruption in Africa has been equated with African politics and political order, and offers a novel approach to understanding corruption as a potentially emancipatory discourse of political transformation.
Conventionally, both academic literature as well as development policies depict corruption as the lynchpin of politics in Africa, locking African societies into political orders which subvert democratic change. Drawing on the findings of a case study of the construction industry in Tanzania, Lucy Koechlin conceptualises corruption as a signifier enabling, rather than preventing, social actors to articulate democratic claims. She provides compelling arguments for a more sophisticated understanding of and empirical attentiveness to emancipatory change in African political orders.