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Continuity and Discontinuity in Learning Careers

Potentials for a Learning Space in a Changing World

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Edited by Barbara Merrill, Andrea Galimberti, Adrianna Nizinska and José González-Monteagudo

Continuity and Discontinuity in Learning Careers: Potentials for a Learning Space in a Changing World focuses on the new challenges and threats posed to adult education as a potential way out of the economic crisis and social change. It explores the role of adult education in relation to the continuity and discontinuity of the learning careers and identities of adults in a range of adult education learning contexts in Europe and beyond. The focus is on non-traditional students and issues of inequality such as class, gender, ethnicity, age, disability and how inequalities may enable or constrain their learning careers and identities.

EqualBITE

Gender equality in higher education

Edited by Judy Robertson

“The ivory tower, like other stately homes in the UK, might present a grand façade to the world but closer inspection reveals a dark, spidery basement full of inequalities.”

Gender imbalances still exist across all areas of higher education. From salaries and promotion, to representation in the curriculum, formal approaches and good intentions rarely address the full complexity. EqualBITE digs into the messy reality of higher education gender issues, presenting people’s stories, experiences and frustrations and – more importantly – what can be done. University of Edinburgh students and staff share real-life experiences of gender challenges and opportunities, and their constructive responses. The book condenses current academic research into practical actions that do make a difference.

EqualBITE is a pragmatic and positive response to gender issues in academia – a catalyst for creating a culture which is better for everyone.

“We were so pleased to see this new guide to one aspect of diversity—gender equality—and to see how good it is: the book is comprehensive; it is raw, honest and personal; and it is very well written. It is a book both for reading cover-to-cover and for dipping into, and it will be enormously influential.” – Jim Smith Director of Science, Wellcome Trust & Gemma Tracey Diversity & Inclusion Programme Manager – Science & Research, Wellcome Trust

“The balance between data and lived experience equip the reader with the vital understanding of the depth of institutionalised inequality…This is recommended reading for anyone working in higher education who truly wants to create a fairer culture of women.” – Talat Yaqoob Director, Equate Scotland

“I really enjoyed reading the recipes - they combine humour with practical advice on how to tackle important gender issues.” – Fiona Watt Vice-Dean Research and Impact, Faculty of Life Science and Medicine, King's College London


Triple Helix

A Journal of University-Industry-Government Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Editor-in-Chief Henry Etzkowitz

The Triple Helix of university-industry-government relations is an internationally recognized model for understanding entrepreneurship, the changing dynamics of universities, innovation and socio-economic development.

The aim of the journal is to publish research for an international audience covering analysis, theory, measurements and empirical enquiry in all aspects of university-industry-government interactions. The objective is to unite key research on the transformations of universities, capitalization of knowledge, translational research, spin-off activities, intellectual property, knowledge and technology transfer, as well as the international bases and dimensions of Triple Helix relations, their impacts, social, economic, political, cultural, health and environmental implications as they arise from and shape Triple Helix interactions.

Open to all innovation authors, the special mission of the journal is to be an international outlet also for innovation scholars from developing countries.