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Does Human Soul Have an Owner?

Patristic Anthropology and Wittgenstein on the Human Identity

Basil Lourié

Abstract

In the mainstream anthropology of Byzantine patristics, the human “I” is twice inconsistent, being identical to but different from a “part of God” and, in the created world, being not a something while without being a nothing. The latter kind of inconsistency was described as well by Ludwig Wittgenstein in his peculiar doctrine of subjectivity.

Tatiana Pentkovskaya

Abstract

The article is devoted to the newest edition of the so-called Dragota Menaion prepared by Iskra Hristova-Shomova. This Bulgarian hymnographic collection survived as the bottom layer of a palimpsest going back to the early twelfth century. It combines the services of the Menaion and the Triodion cycles. The translation contains rare Slavonic lexemes and some archaic Greek borrowings. These features makes this text precious for the studies of liturgy and hymnography among the Slavs.

Cyril Hovorun

Abstract

The paper suggests a new hermeneutical take on receptive patristics. Receptive patristics means here the ways in which patristic texts are perceived in the community of patristic scholars and in ecclesiastical communities. The perceptions of the patristic materials that these two kinds of communities demonstrate are not always convergent. Their divergence can be explained on the basis of the distinction between normative linguistics and sociolinguistics. Ecclesiastical communities tend to treat the language of the Fathers and Mothers of the church in coherence with the way in which the proponents of normative linguistics treat the phenomenon of language. Patristic scholars, in contrast, usually treat them along the line of sociolinguistics. The approach to the language, which is applied by sociolinguistics, if adopted by ecclesiastical communities, could lead to a better understanding between them. It could foster the ecumenical rapprochement between confessional traditions, especially if they are based on patristic identities, such as in the case of Byzantine and Oriental churches. The academic method of sociolinguistics, thus, can be applied to the ecumenical studies and can positively contribute to practical ecumenism.

Series:

H.A.G. Houghton, C.M. Kreinecker, R.F MacLachlan and C.J Smith

The earliest Latin versions of the writings of the New Testament offer important insights into the oldest forms of the biblical text, the use of language in the ancient Church and the foundations from which Christian theology developed in the West. This volume presents a collation of Old Latin evidence for the four principal Pauline Epistles (Romans, 1 and 2 Corinthians and Galatians). The sources comprise twenty-six Vetus Latina manuscripts, ten commentaries written between the fourth and sixth centuries and four early testimonia collections. Their text differs in many ways from the standard Vulgate version. Created using innovative digital editing tools, this collation makes this valuable data available for the first time and is complemented by full electronic transcriptions online.

Series:

H.A.G. Houghton, C.M. Kreinecker, R.F. MacLachlan and C.J. Smith

Series:

H.A.G. Houghton, C.M. Kreinecker, R.F. MacLachlan and C.J. Smith

Series:

H.A.G. Houghton, C.M. Kreinecker, R.F. MacLachlan and C.J. Smith

Series:

H.A.G. Houghton, C.M. Kreinecker, R.F. MacLachlan and C.J. Smith

Series:

H.A.G. Houghton, C.M. Kreinecker, R.F. MacLachlan and C.J. Smith

Series:

H.A.G. Houghton, C.M. Kreinecker, R.F. MacLachlan and C.J. Smith