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CyberResearch on the Ancient Near East and Neighboring Regions

Case Studies on Archaeological Data, Objects, Texts, and Digital Archiving

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Edited by Vanessa Bigot Juloux, Amy Rebecca Gansell and Alessandro Di Ludovico

CyberResearch on the Ancient Near East and Neighboring Regions is now available on PaperHive! PaperHive is a new free web service that offers a platform to authors and readers to collaborate and discuss, using already published research. Please visit the platform to join the conversation. CyberResearch on the Ancient Near East and Neighboring Regions provides case studies on archaeology, objects, cuneiform texts, and online publishing, digital archiving, and preservation.
Eleven chapters present a rich array of material, spanning the fifth through the first millennium BCE, from Anatolia, the Levant, Mesopotamia, and Iran. Customized cyber- and general glossaries support readers who lack either a technical background or familiarity with the ancient cultures. Edited by Vanessa Bigot Juloux, Amy Rebecca Gansell, and Alessandro Di Ludovico, this volume is dedicated to broadening the understanding and accessibility of digital humanities tools, methodologies, and results to Ancient Near Eastern Studies. Ultimately, this book provides a model for introducing cyber-studies to the mainstream of humanities research

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Edited by Jacob Høigilt and Gunvor Mejdell

The Politics of Written Language in the Arab World connects the fascinating field of contemporary written Arabic with the central sociolinguistic notions of language ideology and diglossia. Focusing on Egypt and Morocco, the authors combine large-scale survey data on language attitudes with in-depth analyses of actual language usage and explicit (and implicit) language ideology. They show that writing practices as well as language attitudes in Egypt and Morocco are far more receptive to vernacular forms than has been assumed.

The individual chapters cover a wide variety of media, from books and magazines to blogs and Tweets. A central theme running through the contributions is the social and political function of “doing informality” in a changing public sphere steadily more permeated by written Arabic in a number of media.

The e-book version of this publication is available in Open Access.

Tense and Text in Classical Arabic

A Discourse-oriented Study of the Classical Arabic Tense System

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Michal Marmorstein

In Tense and Text in Classical Arabic, Michal Marmorstein presents a new discourse-oriented analysis of the indicative tense system in Classical Arabic. Critical of commonly held assumptions regarding the binary structure of the tense system and the perfect-imperfect asymmetry, the author redefines the discussion by analysing the extended syntactic and textual environments in which the paradigm of the indicative forms is used.The study shows that the function of Classical Arabic tenses is determined by the interaction of their inherent grammatical meaning and the overall dialogic, narrative, or generic contexts in which they occur. It also demonstrates the particularizing effect of context, so that temporal and aspectual meanings are always more nuanced, delicate, and pragmatically motivated in actual discourse.

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Lily Kahn

A Grammar of the Eastern European Hasidic Hebrew Tale provides the first detailed linguistic analysis of the Hebrew narrative literature composed in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Eastern Europe by followers of the Hasidic spiritual movement. It presents a thorough description of Hasidic Hebrew orthography, morphology, syntax, and lexis illustrated with extensive examples. Attention is devoted to the relationship between Hasidic Hebrew and its biblical, rabbinic, and medieval antecedents; to its links with Aramaic, contemporaneous Maskilic Hebrew, and its authors’ native Yiddish; and to its contributions to Modern (Israeli) Hebrew. The grammar fills a major scholarly gap on the diachronic development of Hebrew and as such will be a key resource for anyone interested in the language’s history.

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Rudolf de Jong

After publishing A Grammar of the Bedouin Dialects of the Northern Sinai Littoral: Bridging the Linguistic Gap between the Eastern and Western Arab World (Brill:2000), Rudolf de Jong completes his description of the Bedouin dialects of the Sinai Desert of Egypt by adding the present volume. To facilitate direct comparison of all Sinai dialects, the dialect descriptions in both volumes run parallel and are thus structured in the same manner. Quoting from his own extensive material and using a total of 95 criteria for comparison, De Jong applies the method of 'multi-dimensional scaling' and his own 'step-method' to arrive at a subdivision into eight (of which seven are 'Bedouin') typological groups in Sinai. An appendix with 68 maps and dialectrometrical plots completes the picture.

Edited by Ofra Tirosh-Becker and Sarah Bunin Benor

The peer-reviewed Journal of Jewish Languages (JJL) constitutes a venue for academic research in the multifaceted field of Jewish Languages. Jewish languages are the languages spoken and written by Jews in their communities around the world. Among these are Yiddish, Judeo-Spanish, Judeo-Arabic, Jewish Aramaic, Judeo-Italian, Judeo-French, Judeo-Provençal, Judeo-Persian, Jewish English, Jewish Malayalam and more. Although these belong to a variety of genealogical language families, Jewish languages have common linguistic features, thus constituting a distinct field of research.
The Journal of Jewish Languages encourages comparative studies across the different Jewish languages as well as in-depth linguistic and philological research of the individual languages and their varieties. The JJL promotes studies that focus on diverse aspects, such as the interactions of these languages with other languages (especially Hebrew, Aramaic, and the surrounding non-Jewish languages), sociolinguistics, translation traditions, and more. Articles in this journal focus on medieval, modern, and contemporary Jewish languages and are based on manuscripts, printed material, orally transmitted translations, field work recordings, online speech samples, and other sources.
Research on Hebrew will be considered for publication in JJL only if it relates to other languages Jews have spoken or written.
JJL encourages diverse methodological and theoretical approaches from dialectology, sociolinguistics, discourse analysis, historical linguistics, formal linguistics, philology, and other fields.

Need support prior to submitting your manuscript? Make the process of preparing and submitting a manuscript easier with Brill's suite of author services, an online platform that connects academics seeking support for their work with specialized experts who can help.
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