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In: Journal of American-East Asian Relations
In: A Companion to Julian the Apostate
Author: Meryl Altman

Abstract

As the International Simone de Beauvoir Society celebrates the relaunch of Simone de Beauvoir Studies, the author looks back with gratitude to longtime editor Yolanda Patterson and reviews what the journal’s thirty-year history has to tell us about Beauvoir scholarship, past, present, and future. Topics discussed include the history of the Society; engagements with Beauvoir from the perspectives of literary criticism, philosophy, and the social sciences; and controversies over Beauvoir’s character, her response to the Occupation, her relationship to Sartre, and her legacy for feminism.

In: Simone de Beauvoir Studies
Author: Mark Camilleri

In 2016, the National Book Council, the ISBN agency for Malta, released its ISBN database online. A few months later, the ISBN database was enhanced with an open-data feature that enables users to download the search results in a single file with read and write access. The database includes all the ISBN data of Malta except for some records and data that were lost during the period before 2013 when paper data storage of ISBN records was the common practice. The implementation of an ISBN electronic database now ensures that no data go missing and facilitates the preservation of metadata. As added value, the open-data system provides access to all of the ISBN records as listed in the database, which means that virtually all of the ISBN data elements can be downloaded from the database. Researchers, publishers, authors, and booksellers all stand to benefit from this open ISBN data system.

In: Logos
In: Diplomatica
In: Logos
In: Logos
In: Logos
Author: Amanda L. Izzo

By the 1910s, the international consortium of women involved in the interdenominational Protestant Young Women’s Christian Association (ywca) faced a reckoning. Over the previous decade, a largely European and North American ywca leadership had expanded successfully what it called the “association movement” into countries it designated as foreign mission territories, establishing dozens of multifunctional community centers across the Asian continent. With their religious, educational, recreational, and vocational programming, ywcas proved adaptable to a wide variety of settings. This success, however, brought the challenge of indigenization, a challenge that sharpened as Western women came to terms with anti-colonial agitation and egalitarian Gospel rhetoric of foreign mission. Detailing the ywca of the United States’s administration of the ywcas of Japan and Turkey in the early 20th Century, this article contends that interpersonal and organizational negotiations of power ultimately gave rise to transnational partnerships that thrived as the u.s. women’s missionary movement ebbed.

In: Journal of American-East Asian Relations