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A Reconstruction Based on the Safaitic Inscriptions
Author:
This book approaches the religion and rituals of the pre-Islamic Arabian nomads using the Safaitic inscriptions. Unlike Islamic-period literary sources, this material was produced by practitioners of traditional Arabian religion; the inscriptions are eyewitnesses to the religious life of Arabian nomads prior to the spread of Judaism and Christianity across Arabia. The author attempts to reconstruct this world using the original words of its inhabitants, interpreted through comparative philology, pre-Islamic and Islamic-period literary sources, and the archaeological context.
In: The Religion and Rituals of the Nomads of Pre-Islamic Arabia
In: The Religion and Rituals of the Nomads of Pre-Islamic Arabia
In: The Religion and Rituals of the Nomads of Pre-Islamic Arabia
In: The Religion and Rituals of the Nomads of Pre-Islamic Arabia
In: The Religion and Rituals of the Nomads of Pre-Islamic Arabia
In: The Religion and Rituals of the Nomads of Pre-Islamic Arabia
In: The Religion and Rituals of the Nomads of Pre-Islamic Arabia
In: The Religion and Rituals of the Nomads of Pre-Islamic Arabia
Author:

Abstract

The present paper deals with the controversially discussed relationships between the gods Alalu, Anu, Kumarbi, and Tarḫunnaš in the Hittite Song of Going Forth (CTH 344). On the basis of a new philological analysis, of comparisons with theogonies or succession myths in other ancient cultures and on the background of considerations on the cross-cultural stratification of various mythical traditions in the surviving Hittite text, various proposals on the genealogical relationship of the deities in question are weighed against each other and reasons are presented for the plausibility of the proposed new translation and general reconstruction that the divine kingship always passes from father to son within a single genealogical line.

Open Access
In: Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions