Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 980 items for :

  • South East Asia x
  • Upcoming Publications x
  • Just Published x
  • Access: Open Access x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
Globalized Fisheries, Nutritional Unequal Exchange and Asian Hunger
East, South and Southeast Asia are home to two-thirds of the world’s hungry people, but they produce more than three-quarters of the world’s fish and nearly half of other foods. Through integration into the world food system, these Asian fisheries export their most nutritious foods and import less healthy substitutes. Worldwide, their exports sell cheap because women, the hungriest Asians, provide unpaid subsidies to production processes. In the 21st century, Asian peasants produce more than 60 percent of the regional food supply, but their survival is threatened by hunger, public depreasantization policies, climate change, land grabbing, urbanization and debt bondage.

Abstract

Focusing on the Philippines’ response to the COVID-19 pandemic, this article examines two key objects used to mitigate the widespread transmission of the virus. To answer the research question, “What is the meaning of face masks and shields in the Philippines during the COVID-19 pandemic?” a patchwork ethnography research method was used to triangulate data from a variety of sources, including academic scholarship, mass media, grey literature, and personal experience. Using Tom Scott-Smith’s theoretical interpretation of Karl Marx’s “commodity fetishism” as a framework, the article traces the concealment, transformation, and mystification of face masks and face shields as humanitarian objects , and explores the social, political, and cultural role they play in the lives of Filipinos during the COVID-19 era.

Open Access
In: Philippine Political Science Journal

Abstract

This article examines central-local dynamics in the Philippines in the era of the pandemic, demonstrating that the national government has not provided the type of “central steering” necessary to confront a foe as tenacious as COVID-19. Instead, there is another type of power that emanates from the center – namely the strong-arming of local politicians by President Rodrigo Duterte. While this form of power may help conceal the government’s “weak steering,” and make the president appear to be in control, it does not produce the quality of national-subnational coordination required for effective pandemic response. It is an escalation of Duterte’s earlier approaches, from 2016 to 2019, albeit no longer accompanied with rhetoric supporting local autonomy. Through examination of key elements of the government’s pandemic response, we advance our core argument: strong-arming is no substitute for effective central steering – whether in responding to this crisis or to other crises that may emerge in the future.

Open Access
In: Philippine Political Science Journal
In: Journal of American-East Asian Relations

Abstract

While access to library and archival collections in mainland China remains unclear due to the ongoing covid-19 pandemic and increasing government scrutiny, past experiences in Chinese archives are still relevant for scholars going forward, in the event that the People’s Republic of China reopens the doors to these collections. In surveying the digital, print publication, and manuscript collections pertaining to the Chinese history of World War ii, this article shows how access to new kinds of sources redefined the pre-pandemic state of the field. In particular, curated volumes that emphasized perspectives from the Chinese Communist Party and leftist intellectuals gradually have given way to a more representative collection of the documentary evidence, and Taiwanese collections continue to be important to the historiography. The article begins with coverage of well-known guides and published catalogues of mainland and Taiwanese collections. It then covers some military documents that Chinese scholars occasionally have referenced. It emphasizes the richness of accessible material on the social and cultural history of the war era as part of a call to colleagues and future students to expand the scope of what is traditionally thought to be “military history.” There is ample opportunity for major interventions into our understanding of wartime China, which shaped the course of modern history overall, and major innovations in historiography that scholars usually make from the dusty reading rooms of the libraries and archives.

Open Access
In: Journal of American-East Asian Relations
Author:

Abstract

This essay introduces readers to the recent discovery of the personal papers of Grand Steward Tajima Michiji. These documents capture the post-surrender reflections of Hirohito, Japan’s Shōwa Emperor, and record him speaking on such issues as his war responsibility, as well as the culpability of prewar politicians such as Konoe Fumimaro and General Tōjō Hideki. In August 2019, Nippon Hoso Kyokai (Japan Broadcasting Corporation) (nhk) announced that it had gained privileged access to the papers. Acting on advice from scholars, it then released extracts from Tajima’s audience records. Drawing not on the Tajima papers themselves, but on what the nhk has made available, the documents demonstrate that Hirohito, after Japan’s surrender, experienced anguish and over the war and its outcome. He continued as emperor because he accepted “moral responsibility” for the war that required him to help his nation and its people endure occupation and reconstruction. This article also describes Hirohito’s postwar reflections on several issues, such as Japanese field officers and subordinates in the 1930s initiating without authorization acts of aggression, the Rape of Nanjing, and Japan’s postwar rearmament. While the Tajima papers will not resolve the ongoing debate over the emperor’s responsibility for Japan’s path of aggression before 1945, they do provide valuable insights about his role in and reaction to events before, during, and after World War ii.

Open Access
In: Journal of American-East Asian Relations

Abstract

Alienation is a universal theme in literature. The game of chance or gambling under capitalism can produce a hostile social setting for those who are unaware of its negative impacts. In such a social milieu, people can experience feelings of alienation, failing to make their lives their own. This paper analyzes the theme of alienation in the game of chance under capitalism in two stories written by s.e.a. Write Awardees, The Lottery of Karma by Chanthi Deuanesavanh and Lottery by Catherine Lim, through the lens of literary devices. The social settings of these stories are two countries in Southeast Asia, and these two writers set their stories in their own respective countries, Lao pdr and the Republic of Singapore. It finds that, in their exposure to such social settings, the protagonists are beset by a sense of alienation regardless of whether they perform their roles as laborers, capitalists, or consumers.

Open Access
In: Manusya: Journal of Humanities

Abstract

This article presents an investigation of Thai auto-part terms in Cognitive Semantics. With at least 1,000 auto-part terms in our data analysis, we argue that the conceptual naming strategy is linguistically effective in understanding auto parts in the Thai culture. Metaphorically, the resemblance operation enhances the degree of lexical richness by enabling the auto-part conceptualization with four source domains: surrounding object, animal, human, and plant. Metonymically, source domains such as shape, function, part, material, position, involved organ, motion, sound and space function in the source-in-target operation, and the category machine/ device appears as a source domain in the target-in-source operation. The article not only verifies and supports the cognitive theory that holds that language is part of the cognitive abilities of humans in general, and thus describes the world as people understand it, but also sheds light on the association to a further pragmatic analysis of implicature.

Open Access
In: Manusya: Journal of Humanities

Abstract

The attitude of France towards the Sino-Japanese War that started in 1937 has given rise to various judgments. Officially neutral, France is often presented as having taken, at least morally, a favorable attitude toward China. Yet the French government had officially prohibited the transit of war materiel en route to China across the Indochinese border. This issue became increasingly important as the Japanese blockade of China progressed and conditioned the capacity of Chiang Kai-shek’s government to continue the fight. The diplomatic archives of the United States, greatly concerned by the situation in China, shed more light on France’s policy in East Asia. By comparing historical accounts produced by contemporaries and historians with the diplomatic archives of the United States, this article intends to bring more evidence relating to the issue of French “neutrality” during the Sino-Japanese War.

Open Access
In: Manusya: Journal of Humanities

Abstract

Writer Faisal Oddang narrated the existence of the bissu community seemingly reconstructed from an understanding of the historical text to become more colorful. This article questions how the transformation model of bissu community figures is revealed in Oddang’s fictional work. This study utilizes Julia Kristeva’s intertext abstracted through ideologeme as a text arrangement that refers to the space of exterior texts (semiotic practice). The results of the study show: first, how the transformation model of the bissu community character appears in the work of fiction; second, the libido of bissu community in their sacred place; third, the bissu community character from marginalized positions fighting injustice against Darul Islam/Indonesia Islamic Army rebels both physically and verbally; fourth, the negotiation of bissu community leaders saving the faith by syncretism with Islam over the religious purification incident. Therefore, in fiction, the character of the bissu community shows both opposition and resistance.

Open Access
In: Manusya: Journal of Humanities