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Abstract

This paper reconsiders an alleged textual problem raised by the word ξουφηρία in one of Gregory of Nazianzus’s letters to Basil (Ep. 4). Contrary to what has been argued by a recent scholar, the text does not need emendation. The problem can be resolved by means of lexicographical analysis: ξουφηρία is merely a spelling variant of ζοφερία (“darkness”).

Open Access
In: Vigiliae Christianae
Author:

Abstract

This article investigates a little-known yet highly significant facet of the Arabic liturgical Gospel books – the commentary that was introduced into the Gospel readings from at least the 11th century to the 19th century, notably during the time of Patriarch Athanasios III Dabbās, the last publisher to include this commentary. This study aims to shed light on the origin and evolution of this commentary, categorize its contents, and evaluate its theological importance in the context of the Arab Christian tradition. By offering fresh perspectives on the composition of Lectionary commentaries, this research enriches our comprehension of the history and theology of the Arab Christian tradition.

Open Access
In: Scrinium
In: Scrinium

Abstract

This study offers preliminary remarks on a hitherto unknown Greek translation of the Covenant of Muḥammad by the Patriarch Sophronios of Kilis. The translation is preserved in a single miscellaneous codex entitled Sarakēnika, which was compiled between 1770 and 1780 by the renowned Phanariot scholar and bibliophile Nikolaos Karatzas, a former official of the Patriarchate of Constantinople (MS Gr. 112, Princeton University Library). As the inclusion of the translation in the codex is representative of the cultural transfers that took place between the Arabic-speaking and the Greek peoples during the 17th- and 18th-century Ottoman Empire, this study examines, in particular, the knowledge regimes for the production of the text. In the Appendix, an editio princeps of the translation is provided.

Open Access
In: Scrinium
Author:

Abstract

Some studies on Ibn al-Sirrī, a Christian author and translator from the 9th century, have remained unpublished since limited discoveries were made after 1987. Identifying the homilies discussed in this study will enable scholars to explore various aspects. First, it will facilitate the study of his theological vocabulary, which appears to represent a form of medieval ecumenical discourse. A thorough examination of his style may also uncover additional works attributed to him.

Open Access
In: Scrinium
Author:

Abstract

This article presents the new findings connected to several Arabic books that have been discovered by TYPARABIC team members in libraries around the world, where they were catalogued in insufficient or inaccurate detail, which has led to their being kept hidden from scrutiny until now. Projects of reediting and translating these Arabic books, to allow their study by a larger academic community, are also presented herewith. One of these books is of utmost importance for the discussions that will take place in 2024, when 300 years from the split in the Church of Antioch will be commemorated through conferences and volumes of collected works.

Open Access
In: Scrinium
Author:

Abstract

This article argues (1) that there is insufficient evidence to conclude that a or the “gnostic heresy” (Irenaeus, Against Heresies 1.11.1) referred to a specific social group whose theology is witnessed in Against Heresies 1.29 and (2) that the aeonology in this passage influenced Valentinus. There is no evidence that the aeonology in Against Heresies 1.29 existed prior to 160 CE, the approximate date of Valentinus’s demise; thus this material could not have shaped Valentinus’s theology. Instead of thinking with Irenaeus in terms of unidirectional influence (Irenaeus’s constructed “gnostic heresy” inspiring Valentinus/Valentinians), future theories ought to account for multiple directions of influence and entanglement between various early Christian theologians in the late second century CE.

Open Access
In: Vigiliae Christianae

Abstract

Patriarch Anastasius of Antioch was one of the most important religious leaders in the later sixth century. He left behind a substantial oeuvre, which focuses on Christology and Trinitarian theology. He was most comfortable with exegesis of Scripture but had a shaky grasp of philosophical terms and concepts that informed the debate was shaky. This was already seen by Günter Weiss who offered a detailed analysis of the texts. I concur with Weiss’ judgement and limit myself to the discussion of aspects of Anastasius’ speculation that he had not dealt with.

Open Access
In: Scrinium

Abstract

While previous scholarship has shown that the rhetorical figure of the “heretical woman” was important in Jerome’s slandering of male rivals, this article argues that the “orthodox woman” played a just as important role in his self-presentation as an orthodox teacher. The “orthodox woman” is characterized by true asceticism which, according to Jerome’s ascetic theology, implies that she transcends her sex. Rather than being a “woman”, in the ordinary sense of the word, she is an angelic being with a supernatural understanding, which allows her to discern the spiritual meaning of the Scriptures and to distinguish between orthodoxy and heresy. It is argued that the presentation of the “orthodox woman” as very learned, independent and strong-willed makes her the direct opposite of Jerome’s “heretical woman”, and that such a portrayal suited Jerome’s purposes, as his great reliance on women readers called for a defence of female spiritual authority.

Open Access
In: Vigiliae Christianae

Abstract

Previous research on the Teachings of Silvanus has led to the generally accepted conclusion that the present form of the work is the result of a long textual development. Because of the text’s close relationship with the biblical and Hellenistic-Jewish Wisdom literature, it has been suggested that its earliest form was a Jewish sapiential writing, which over a long period of time was Christianised by the addition of New Testament material and Christian theological speculations. In the present study, the problem of the Teachings’ textual development is approached from a literary analysis of the text. It is argued that the work contains many instances of parallelismus membrorum, which in some cases are closely interwoven with biblical and Jewish sapiential texts and in other cases are abruptly broken up by Christian interpolations.

Open Access
In: Vigiliae Christianae