Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 1,014 items for :

  • History of Religion x
  • Upcoming Publications x
  • Just Published x
  • Access: Open Access x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All

Abstract

Religious studies of Rwanda typically focus on Christianity’s involvement before, during, and after the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi, also referred to as the Rwandan Genocide. Rwanda’s postgenocide reconstruction has witnessed new and changing political and social commitments by previously established religious organisations such as the Roman Catholic, Protestant, and Adventist Churches. The Rwandan government has taken a more progressive stance on divisions of power and religious institutions, and the promotion of religious freedoms that has benefitted the domestic Muslim population. This essay examines how Judaism, a previously unknown religion in the region, is impacting Rwandan identity formation. Jewish identity is increasingly being tied to the nation’s own reconstructed identity, with a strong focus on historical persecution, rebuilding after genocide, and development. This essay suggests that Rwandan identity and religious studies should include the ever-growing ties with Jews and Israel to better understand its political and social reconstruction since 1994.

Open Access
In: Journal of Religion in Africa
Authors: and

Abstract

In this article we aim to explore how vernacular ideas about spiritual power, words, and silence shape perceptions of religion and witchcraft among the rural Komi people, whose predominant religion is Russian Orthodoxy. In this framework we investigate local ideas of witchcraft, belonging, and strangeness. During our joint ethnographic fieldwork trips to the Komi Republic, Russia, these notions were evoked repeatedly in discussions concerning the Evangelical Protestants who established their mission in a village historically associated with witches. This particular coincidence is reflected in discourses that brand the Evangelicals culturally alien, drawing on both traditional and contemporary categories of otherness. Our analysis shows that ideas about magical power and the usage of words constitute significant aspects of vernacular understanding of faith regardless of formal denominational belonging. We claim that religious practices are switched more spontaneously than feelings of spiritual power and traditionally accepted religious belonging among the rural Komi.

Open Access
In: Numen

Abstract

Building on the idea of “ritual quotation,” this article offers a new perspective on rituals enacted within contemporary theatrical performances in South India. Drawing from an existing corpus and reproduced in a different framework, the ritual tēvāram is embedded in a broad web of intertextual relationships comprised not only of items of repertoire and prescriptive manuals, but also of elements of ritual practices, shared beliefs, claims of social status, and ongoing negotiations between individual imagination and collective expectations.

Usually a Nampūtiri domestic ritual, tēvāram is also carried out within Kūṭiyāṭṭam performances. Through a detailed analysis, I argue that the enactment of tēvāram on stage is not merely the stylized reproduction of a religious service, but it is rather an integral part of the narrative and aesthetic body of the theater practice. The performative and textual milieu of tēvāram creates scope for variations that modify both the plot and the tēvāram ritual itself. Kūṭiyāṭṭam-tēvāram thus becomes a transformative action and a tool of negotiation in the positioning of individuals within the social matrix.

Open Access
In: Numen

Abstract

This article proposes a reassessment of the Gnostic Apocalypse of Paul by focusing on genre, intertextuality, and structure as well as recurrent motifs. It argues that the Apocalypse situates the mission of Paul negatively in relation to a prison-like cosmos and positively in relation to the twelve apostles and that its form and objectives are best compatible with a fourth-century date.

Open Access
In: Gnosis: Journal of Gnostic Studies
A Festschrift on the Occasion of the 50th Anniversary of BETH
Volume Editors: , , and
During the past 50 years, theological libraries have confronted secularisation and religious pluralism, along with revolutionary technological developments that brought not only significant challenges but also unexpected opportunities to adopt new instruments for the transfer of knowledge through the automation and computerisation of libraries. This book shows how European theological libraries tackled these challenges; how they survived by redefining their task, by participating in the renewal of scholarly librarianship, and by networking internationally. Since 1972, BETH, the Association of European Theological Libraries, has stimulated this process by enabling contacts among a growing number of national library associations all over Europe.

Abstract

Exorcism is flourishing once again in the Roman Catholic Church today. Discourse on the topic has been influenced by the publications of exorcists such as Malachi Martin and Gabriele Amorth. They claim biblical precedence and commissioning for their duties as exorcists and seek to emphasise their credentials by interacting with modern medicine. At the same time, they provide descriptions of demonic possession which surpass and even contradict the accounts found in the Gospels. We analyse the claims of modern exorcists concerning demons, those they possess, and how they are expelled, and evaluate these against the evidence in the Gospels. We discover that the narratives constructed by modern exorcists involves both a dramatisation of the supernatural that exceeds the exorcisms of Jesus, and the ‘medicalisation’ of exorcism as a means to legitimise the practice as a valid alternative or complement to modern medicine and psychology.

Open Access
In: Religion and Theology

Abstract

This paper describes the opening of a Special Interest Group of libraries within the IFLA (International Federation of Libraries Associations and Institutions), ‘Religions: Libraries and dialogue’. Different aspects of the networking are described: the contacts established for the opening, the enlargement to other continents and religions, notable members of the group, and the main activities developed.

Open Access
In: Theological Libraries and Library Associations in Europe

Abstract

Since 1996, the National Office for Ecclesiastical Cultural Heritage and Religious Buildings (BCE) of the Italian Bishop Conference (CEI) carries out a support, coordination and guidance service in the sector of cultural heritage and religious buildings for ecclesiastical libraries, archives and museums. BCE coordinates a network of 270 ecclesiastical libraries, which is part of the National Library Service (SBN). The BeWeB architecture allows all Italian ecclesiastical libraries resources to be published. BeWeB is a cross-domain portal expression of the work of an editorial staff distributed throughout the territory, integrating ancient and modern book collections and manuscripts, but also art objects, archive collections, religious buildings, in-depth content and much more.

Open Access
In: Theological Libraries and Library Associations in Europe
In: Theological Libraries and Library Associations in Europe

Abstract

In 1947 a bright young monk of the Benedictine St. Peter’s Abbey in Steenbrugge (Bruges), Jan-Eligius Dekkers, first announced his plans to collect the complete works of the Latin and Greek Church Fathers in a single, uniform series of critical text editions. Over the course of 75 years the collection, called Corpus Christianorum, expanded chronologically, methodologically and logistically. To serve Dekkers’ purpose, the monastic library at Steenbrugge developed into a scholarly centre that despite many evolutions and transformations still operates today as the Corpus Christianorum headquarters in Turnhout, Belgium. Although the physical volumes in its flagship series continue to be produced in print, the digital turn, too, has come full circle: in 2019 Clavis Clavium was launched, an online collaborative platform building on the foundations of Dom Dekkers’ Clavis Patrum Latinorum.

Open Access
In: Theological Libraries and Library Associations in Europe