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Abstract

Central to this article are two maps by Floris Balthasarsz van Berckenrode, both on the siege of Grave (1602) by Maurice of Orange during the Dutch Revolt. The first map was in 1602 produced as a news map about the events, the second was a re-edition, published eight years later as a book illustration for Jan Jansz Orlers, Den Nassauschen Lauren-Crans (Leiden 1610). In this article, principles for a new method are introduced to analyse and compare these ‘story maps’ with particular attention to the narrative impact of the map. Using this method in combi-nation with (book) historical research, it argues that the 1610 map should be considered as a ‘memorial map’ that reframes the collective memory of the Dutch Revolt. It emphasizes the dynamic relationship between news, map and book publishing and pleads for a more prominent position of story maps and book illustrations in Early Modern memory landscapes.

Open Access
In: Quaerendo

Abstract

This article identifies the personalities and circumstances behind two previously unknown heterodox religious publishing projects of the seventeenth century. The first was based in Leiden in the United Provinces, while the second originated in Dresden in Electoral Saxony. The Leiden project was likely led by the German jurist Johann Angelius Werdenhagen, who in 1628 had Jacob Böhme’s Weg zu Christo and Anna Ovena Hoyer’s Gespräch Eines Kindes mit seiner Mutter printed in Leiden at the presses of Govert Basson. This project demonstrates Werdenhagen’s centrality in the early distribution of Böhme’s theosophical doctrines in the United Provinces. The Dresden project was funded by Rosine Vogtin, who from 1642 commissioned the office of Gimel Bergen to print works by Jacob Böhme and Ludwig Friedrich Gifftheil.

Open Access
In: Quaerendo
A Festschrift on the Occasion of the 50th Anniversary of BETH
Volume Editors: , , and
During the past 50 years, theological libraries have confronted secularisation and religious pluralism, along with revolutionary technological developments that brought not only significant challenges but also unexpected opportunities to adopt new instruments for the transfer of knowledge through the automation and computerisation of libraries. This book shows how European theological libraries tackled these challenges; how they survived by redefining their task, by participating in the renewal of scholarly librarianship, and by networking internationally. Since 1972, BETH, the Association of European Theological Libraries, has stimulated this process by enabling contacts among a growing number of national library associations all over Europe.

Abstract

This paper describes the opening of a Special Interest Group of libraries within the IFLA (International Federation of Libraries Associations and Institutions), ‘Religions: Libraries and dialogue’. Different aspects of the networking are described: the contacts established for the opening, the enlargement to other continents and religions, notable members of the group, and the main activities developed.

Open Access
In: Theological Libraries and Library Associations in Europe

Abstract

Since 1996, the National Office for Ecclesiastical Cultural Heritage and Religious Buildings (BCE) of the Italian Bishop Conference (CEI) carries out a support, coordination and guidance service in the sector of cultural heritage and religious buildings for ecclesiastical libraries, archives and museums. BCE coordinates a network of 270 ecclesiastical libraries, which is part of the National Library Service (SBN). The BeWeB architecture allows all Italian ecclesiastical libraries resources to be published. BeWeB is a cross-domain portal expression of the work of an editorial staff distributed throughout the territory, integrating ancient and modern book collections and manuscripts, but also art objects, archive collections, religious buildings, in-depth content and much more.

Open Access
In: Theological Libraries and Library Associations in Europe
In: Theological Libraries and Library Associations in Europe

Abstract

In 1947 a bright young monk of the Benedictine St. Peter’s Abbey in Steenbrugge (Bruges), Jan-Eligius Dekkers, first announced his plans to collect the complete works of the Latin and Greek Church Fathers in a single, uniform series of critical text editions. Over the course of 75 years the collection, called Corpus Christianorum, expanded chronologically, methodologically and logistically. To serve Dekkers’ purpose, the monastic library at Steenbrugge developed into a scholarly centre that despite many evolutions and transformations still operates today as the Corpus Christianorum headquarters in Turnhout, Belgium. Although the physical volumes in its flagship series continue to be produced in print, the digital turn, too, has come full circle: in 2019 Clavis Clavium was launched, an online collaborative platform building on the foundations of Dom Dekkers’ Clavis Patrum Latinorum.

Open Access
In: Theological Libraries and Library Associations in Europe

Abstract

This article provides insight in the way libraries are faced with a digitalizing world. We focus on thematic collections; how these collections are created and can be propagated. General aspects concerning the disclosure of thematic collections are exemplified by the Maurits Sabbe Library’s jesuitica collections. We share some thoughts on how resource management (cataloguing) and digitisation have evolved since the beginning of the 21st century. Digitalisation offers librarians challenges as well as opportunities; a shift from information provision to information access is definitely noticeable, yet a crucial factor in data and information provision will still remain for the foreseeable future.

Open Access
In: Theological Libraries and Library Associations in Europe

Abstract

The complex system of Italian ecclesiastical libraries needs to be known in its peculiarities and in its evolution. Here, we offer a definition of what an ecclesiastical library is; we also review the main national census initiatives carried out in Italy over the last 50 years. The panorama of ecclesiastical libraries is part of the more complex relations between the Catholic Church and the Italian State. We present the framework of the main documents that guide the activities of ecclesiastical libraries in Italy, with reference to the relations between the Catholic Church and the Italian State.

Open Access
In: Theological Libraries and Library Associations in Europe
Author:

Abstract

The article, whose introductory parts survey the history of church libraries in Poland since the Middle Ages, through the losses sustained during World War II up to their further development during the communist regime, focuses on one aspect that has emerged after the fall of communism: computerisation and the use of catalogues. The main theme revolves around the establishment and operation of a special association of church libraries, the Federation of Church Libraries ‘Fides’, and its most significant achievement: the creation of the Union Catalogue of Church Libraries in Koha software, launched in 2014.

Open Access
In: Theological Libraries and Library Associations in Europe