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Abstract

The first unmetrical word of Leonidas, AP 6.4 requires emendation, not explanation. On the basis of a variant in Lucian, a new textual suggestion is made. The paper explores metrical and intertextual criteria for explaining the passage, but rejects them in favour of emendation.

Open Access
In: Mnemosyne
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Abstract

The character designated by the manuscripts as Senex, who accompanies Andromache and Astyanax in act three of Seneca’s Troades, is problematic in many ways. He is not identified or acknowledged by any other character; his entrance and exit are unannounced; his presence onstage in the first half of the act requires that Astyanax’s two words of dialogue be delivered by a fourth actor or through ventriloquism; his very existence conflicts with the obvious interpretation of at least two sections of Andromache’s dialogue. All of these anomalies can be removed if there is in fact no Senex and the dialogue attributed to him by the manuscripts is spoken by the Chorus leader. This level of involvement in the action by the Chorus would itself be unusual in Senecan tragedy, but it does have parallels and would also fit with the exceptional treatment of the Chorus throughout Troades.

Open Access
In: Mnemosyne

Abstract

The words κακὸν κακῶς σε at D. 18.267 are printed in quotation marks in many modern editions of the speech. This sequence scans as the beginning of an iambic trimeter and is connected by καί with two quotations from tragedy. This article questions the idea that the sequence should be interpreted as the start of an interrupted quotation by showing that (1) these words are part of a standard, vernacular Greek curse formula, (2) initial καί may be interpreted as a discourse-level connector rather than as a syntactic coordinator, and (3) word order in the curse may be accounted for without invoking metrical effects. In particular, it is suggested that Demosthenes’ wording of the curse should be interpreted as a parody of the plea to the judges at Aeschin. 2.180.

Open Access
In: Mnemosyne
In: Mnemosyne
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Abstract

Melinno’s so-called Hymn to Rome was composed sometime between the third century BCE and the third century CE. Nearly all scholars judge the poem to be a relatively straightforward panegyric of Rome’s power. The final stanza compares the Romans to the Sown Men. This article argues that the appearance of Theban or Colchian Spartoi could have evoked a more complex response from many probable readers of Melinno’s poem in antiquity, especially those who were well versed in Latin literature and Rome’s harrowing histories of civil war. It proposes that the closing comparison underscores the Romans’ fatal flaw: their inborn compulsion to engage in internecine strife. By concluding the hymn with a destabilizing reference, Melinno’s linking of Rome and Thebes points to a more nuanced evaluation of Roman power than scholars have yet to recognize.

Open Access
In: Mnemosyne

Abstract

In this paper we begin with a brief survey of the presence of the mysteries in Greek and Latin epic poetry, before giving an overview of the mysteries in Vergil and attempting to identify the function of the references to mystery religion in Aeneid 6. Throughout, we consider the modality of how the poets allude to the mysteries in ways that allow mystery cults to take on a life of their own in imaginative literary representations, arriving at the conclusion that it is only by means of closer collaboration between literary critics and historians of religion that progress will be made in this complex field of study.

Open Access
In: Mnemosyne
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Abstract

Galen’s relationship to the sophist movement is a familiar theme. This paper looks at the development of modern ideas on the subject and offers some new ways of linking him with authors such as Plutarch and Lucian. Not only was he a public intellectual, but his position at court placed him as close to the centre of imperial power as did that of an ab epistulis, and to possible obloquy, not least in the years around 192.

Open Access
In: AION (filol.) Annali dell'Università degli Studi di Napoli "L'Orientale"

Abstract

Greek periplography appears to have been an almost exclusively prosaic phenomenon. The single exception to this is Zenothemis (4th/3rd cent. BC) whom John Tzetzes credits with the production of an elegiac distich (SH 855 = Tz. H. 7.765f.) apparently sourced from a Periplous. This brief note contributes to the discussion about the shape of Zenothemis’ Periplous by offering a series of stylistic observations about the single surviving fragment and considering the rationale for ascribing (or not) seven other testimonia (SH 856-862) to this poem.

Open Access
In: Mnemosyne
Author:

Abstract

Starting from an allusion to Eclogue 1 in Propertius 2.16, the article provides a new interpretation of the entire elegy in the light of the complex intertextual play which pervades the whole poem. Eclogues 1 and 10, the Georgics and even Horace are here combined with allusions to Comedy and evoked only to be subverted and parodied in a piece of Callimachean poetry, full of ‘metaliterary’ irony.

Open Access
In: AION (filol.) Annali dell'Università degli Studi di Napoli "L'Orientale"

Abstract

This article reviews two monographs recently published on the subject of Cicero’s reception in the imperial period: Keeline’s 2018 The Reception of Cicero in the Early Roman Empire and La Bua’s 2019 Cicero and Roman Education. As Cicero’s Nachleben is assuming a position of increasing salience in classical studies, this review contextualizes these two volumes within over a century of scholarship on the subject. Keeline’s book demonstrates the critical importance of the schoolroom in shaping almost every aspect of Cicero’s posthumous reception, while La Bua’s methodically elucidates how Cicero’s speeches were taught and read in the classrooms of the empire. The article concludes with an argument for a new approach to studying the reception of Cicero in this period.

Open Access
In: Mnemosyne