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Proceedings of the Fifteenth Workshop of The International Network Impact of Empire (Nijmegen, 18-20 May 2022)
Volume Editors: , , and
This volume focuses on the interface between tradition and the shifting configuration of power structures in the Roman Empire. By examining various time periods and locales, its contributions show the Empire as a world filed with a wide variety of cultural, political, social, and religious traditions. These traditions were constantly played upon in the processes of negotiation and (re)definition that made the empire into a superstructure whose coherence was embedded in its diversity.

Abstract

This data paper describes the Corpus of Early English Correspondence Extension Sampler (ceeces), a linguistic corpus of personal letters covering the long eighteenth century. The letters have been sampled and transcribed from various printed editions and are now openly distributed through Zenodo. The ceeces contains 2,624 letters by 200 writers, some 1.14 million words. It comes in several versions – plain text, xml, standardised-spelling, and part-of-speech tagged – with ample metadata on the correspondents and the letters, enabling the sociolinguistic study of historical English using a range of social variables including gender, age, social rank, and geographical region.

Open Access
In: Research Data Journal for the Humanities and Social Sciences

Abstract

The War dummies dataset offers structured data on Dutch-involved organised armed confrontations from 1566 to 1812. Comprising 1216 records detailing the participation of 95 entities in 548 encounters across 50 wars, it fills a crucial need for well-structured, accessible, and reusable pre-1815 historical warfare data. Based on the comprehensive Military History of the Netherlands book series, it aligns with post-1815 conflict datasets like the Inter-State War Database of the Correlates of War Project and the Georeferenced Event Dataset of the Uppsala Conflict Data Program. This article outlines the data collection, structure, and potential research applications, and discusses data quality and potential biases. The War dummies codebook offers comprehensive variable descriptions.

Open Access
In: Research Data Journal for the Humanities and Social Sciences

Abstract

The Daedongnyeojido 大東輿地圖 or “Territorial Map of the Great East [Korea]” is considered as the most significant work of Korean cartography due to its unusual size, accuracy and practicability of use. This woodblock printed map, of which 33 copies have survived, was made in 1861 by Kim Jeong-ho 金正浩 (ca. 1804–ca. 1866). About two thirds of these prints show variations in their colouring. In the following years manuscript copies of Daedongnyeojido were produced – also in various colouring. After providing an overview of the role of colours in Korean cartography, this paper aims to classify the Daedongnyeojido in the tradition of colouring Korean maps. It will examine how the various colourings differ from each other and will discuss for what reasons and in which way the colourist used colours to reflect specific information on the maps. Furthermore the paper will provide an insight into the colourants used for the colouring of two map sets kept in the Museum am Rothenbaum in Hamburg.

Open Access
In: Maps and Colours