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Why devote a Companion to the "mirrors for princes", whose very existence is debated? These texts offer key insights into political thoughts of the past. Their ambiguous, problematic status further enhances their interest. And although recent research has fundamentally challenged established views of these texts, until now there has been no critical introduction to the genre.
This volume therefore fills this important gap, while promoting a global historical perspective of different “mirrors for princes” traditions from antiquity to humanism, via Byzantium, Persia, Islam, and the medieval West. This Companion also proposes new avenues of reflection on the anchoring of these texts in their historical realities.

Contributors are Makram Abbès, Denise Aigle, Olivier Biaggini, Hugo Bizzarri, Charles F. Briggs, Sylvène Edouard, Jean-Philippe Genet, John R. Lenz, Louise Marlow, Cary J. Nederman, Corinne Peneau, Stéphane Péquignot, Noëlle-Laetitia Perret, Günter Prinzing, Volker Reinhardt, Hans-Joachim Schmidt, Tom Stevenson, Karl Ubl, and Steven J. Williams.

Abstract

Central to this article are two maps by Floris Balthasarsz van Berckenrode, both on the siege of Grave (1602) by Maurice of Orange during the Dutch Revolt. The first map was in 1602 produced as a news map about the events, the second was a re-edition, published eight years later as a book illustration for Jan Jansz Orlers, Den Nassauschen Lauren-Crans (Leiden 1610). In this article, principles for a new method are introduced to analyse and compare these ‘story maps’ with particular attention to the narrative impact of the map. Using this method in combi-nation with (book) historical research, it argues that the 1610 map should be considered as a ‘memorial map’ that reframes the collective memory of the Dutch Revolt. It emphasizes the dynamic relationship between news, map and book publishing and pleads for a more prominent position of story maps and book illustrations in Early Modern memory landscapes.

Open Access
In: Quaerendo

Abstract

This article identifies the personalities and circumstances behind two previously unknown heterodox religious publishing projects of the seventeenth century. The first was based in Leiden in the United Provinces, while the second originated in Dresden in Electoral Saxony. The Leiden project was likely led by the German jurist Johann Angelius Werdenhagen, who in 1628 had Jacob Böhme’s Weg zu Christo and Anna Ovena Hoyer’s Gespräch Eines Kindes mit seiner Mutter printed in Leiden at the presses of Govert Basson. This project demonstrates Werdenhagen’s centrality in the early distribution of Böhme’s theosophical doctrines in the United Provinces. The Dresden project was funded by Rosine Vogtin, who from 1642 commissioned the office of Gimel Bergen to print works by Jacob Böhme and Ludwig Friedrich Gifftheil.

Open Access
In: Quaerendo
In: Horace across the Media
In: Horace across the Media
A Jesuit Life in Baroque Rome
Editor:
As a key figure in baroque Rome, Sforza Pallavicino embodies many of the apparent tensions and contradictions of his era: a man of the church deeply involved in the new science, a nobleman and courtier drawn to ascetism and theology, a controversial polemicist involved in poetry and the arts. This volume collects essays by specialists in the fields and disciplines that cover Pallavicino’s activities as a scholar, author and Jesuit, and situate him within the Roman cultural, political and social elite of his times. Through the figure of Pallavicino, an image of baroque Rome emerges that challenges historical periodisations and disciplinary boundaries.

Contributors: Silvia Apollonio, Stefan Bauer, Eraldo Bellini, Chiara Catalano, Maarten Delbeke, Maria Pia Donato, Federica Favino, Irene Fosi, Sven K. Knebel, Alessandro Metlica, Anselm Ramelow, Pietro Giulio Riga, and Jon R. Snyder.
In: Taxing Difference in Peru and New Spain (16th–19th Century)
In: Taxing Difference in Peru and New Spain (16th–19th Century)
In: Sforza Pallavicino