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In: Taxing Difference in Peru and New Spain (16th–19th Century)
In: Taxing Difference in Peru and New Spain (16th–19th Century)
Author:

Abstract

In 2019, the Mondragon worker cooperatives, which number around 100, employed over 81 000 workers. Based primarily on information from the Mondragon annual reports, this article traces Mondragon’s employment record from 1983–2019. In this period its Spanish employment growth outran that of Spain by a factor of 3.4, and that of the aggregated oecd countries by a factor of 6.3. On top of the Spanish employment, Mondragon cooperatives’ subsidiaries employed about 4300 workers abroad (7% of the total) in 2001, and about 14 500 (18% of the total) in 2019. The article expands on the reasons for this last type of employment. The article also explains why the proportion of cooperative owner-members in the total employment varies over time. Depending on the sector, in 2019 this proportion is 32–45%, and measured as a proportion of the employment in cooperatives 32–74%—the difference being engendered by non-cooperative subsidiaries. Many cooperatives regard these proportions as second-best practices in the search for a modus between competitive pressures and the maintenance of employment within cooperatives.

Open Access
In: Journal of Labor and Society
Author:

Abstract

The last fifteen years witnessed a remarkable revitalization in the field of Second International historiography. This renewed literature put forward different approaches and perspectives, as the interest for the history of social democracy draws on academic as well as political considerations. Whereas an important trend of this revitalization came from studies that focused on social and cultural aspects, this review explores two recent volumes published by North American authors that propose a different, and explicitly political, approach towards the history of social democracy in the years of the Second International.

Open Access
In: Journal of Labor and Society
Author:

Abstract

This paper is delivered from a conceptual theoretical review of grey literature: identifying key concepts and pragmatic policy interventions, which are required to address various aspects of the digital workforce. The main objective and purpose of this study is to analyze then articulate how technological panopticism, digital surveillance has changed the world of work. The study alerts us to the significant changes in work relations, which have been imposed by the digital age. At a nascent level society is asked to consider; how prepared are we to address the effects of technological panopticism on the mental (and physical) wellbeing of digital workers. On a nuanced basis the study fulfils another societal role: acting to introduce consideration of the digital surveillance aspects of how interaction with artificial intelligence and/or the internet of things could develop in the 2020s.

Open Access
In: Journal of Labor and Society

Abstract

As the “October Revolution” of 2019 spread throughout Lebanon, the northern city of Tripoli soon became a veritable hotbed of protests. Over several weeks, the city saw a string of the largest anti-government protests in the country, thus earning the moniker “Bride of Revolution” (‘Arus al-Thawrah). However, it did not take long for things to begin to fall apart. Tripoli would soon give a picture of a not-so-glorious protest movement, penetrated by a potpourri of scheming elements of the Lebanese kleptocracy and business elites and geopolitical interests. The revolutionary slogans and bonds that connected the city’s sectarian mosaic proved ephemeral. The ontological vibrancy, multiplicity, and heterogeneity of the protest movement gave way to political monotony, sameness, and ideological harmony. This paper provides an explanation of how the revolution coexisted, and often perilously so, with its nemesis – counterrevolution – in the protest movement in Tripoli.

Open Access
In: Protest

Abstract

Immigrant day laborers routinely experience exploitative behaviors as part of their employment. These day laborers perceive the exploitation they experience in the context of their immigration histories and in the context of their long-term goals for better working and living conditions. Using mixed methods, over three data collection periods in 2016, 2019 and 2020, we analyze the work experiences of immigrant day laborers in Houston and Austin, Texas. We report how workers evaluate precarious jobs and respond to labor exploitation in an informal labor market. We also discuss data from a worker rights training intervention conducted through a city-sponsored worker center. We discuss the potential for worker centers to be a convening and remediation space for workers and employers. Worker centers offer a potential space for informal intervention into wage theft and work safety violations by regulating the hiring context where day laborers meet employers.

Open Access
In: Journal of Labor and Society
Author:
This book depicts the long rich life and wide ranging work of Count Athanasius Raczyński (1788-1874). By exploring his complex personality, his processes of thought and his accomplishments, it reveals a man at once a wealthy aristocrat, a Pole in the Prussian diplomatic service, an active participant in and perceptive observer and critical commentator on political life, a connoisseur and art collector of European renown, and the author of ground breaking studies on German and Portuguese art – in short a distinguished and fascinating nineteenth century figure.
In: Athanasius Raczyński (1788-1874). Aristocrat, Diplomat, and Patron of the Arts
In: Athanasius Raczyński (1788-1874). Aristocrat, Diplomat, and Patron of the Arts