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Language is not neutral; it determines, and is determined, by perspective. This volume explores the role of an influential vocabulary of war, sanitised language, the language that seeks to clean up the appearance of events through euphemism, abstract words and opaque phrases. Critical discourse analysis of the language of recent military campaigns shows that the public authorities do not explain events as clearly as they might. Despite social, political and strategic incentives to use sanitised language, its use appears to undermine the democratic process and reduce public authorities’ freedoms, possibly emboldening adversaries and turning away potential partners.
How to legally assess the situation when humanitarian actors in non-international armed conflicts are arbitrarily denied access to the affected civilian population? The book answers this question from the perspective of the five main actors involved in humanitarian relief in non-international armed conflicts: the affected State, non-State armed groups, humanitarian actors, non-belligerent States and the affected civilian population. It examines the legal regulations and consequences for each of these actors. In doing so, the book not only draws attention to existing legal gaps and challenges, but also encourages readers to rethink outdated legal concepts and discuss new approaches.

The open access publication of this book has been published with the support of the Swiss National Science Foundation.
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Abstract

Scholars from different disciplines are increasingly debating how human rights should protect the autonomy not only over our bodies but also over our minds. These debates are often driven by emerging technologies that appear able to access, monitor, and manipulate mental states in ways that were previously inconceivable. Whereas some human rights already protect certain personal interests in the mental realm, such as the right to freedom of thought, it has been argued that new or updated human rights are necessary to offer adequate protection against modern technologies that may threaten our mental privacy, personal integrity, and identity. One of the proposed rights, which is under consideration by the Council of Europe and the UN Human Rights Council, concerns a right to ‘psychological continuity’. This paper challenges the necessity of recognising such a right, arguing that the notion of psychological continuity already receives considerable protection within the established framework of human rights law.

Open Access
In: European Convention on Human Rights Law Review
Reflecting and Building on the Work of John Witte, Jr.
Across four decades, John Witte, Jr. has advanced the study of law and religion by retrieving religious sources of law, renewing timeless teachings of religion for today, and reengaging with the difficult issues confronting society. Interdisciplinary, international, and interfaith in scope, Witte’s work has generated an enormous body of scholarship. This collection of essays by leading scholars examines his impact and maps new directions for future exploration.
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Abstract

Strasbourg has faced considerable hostility from United Kingdom (UK) authorities in recent years. But what has been the response of the European Court of Human Rights? Has this criticism resulted in capitulation, backlash, or business as usual? This article offers an empirical assessment of all applications against the UK dealt with by the European Court of Human Rights since 2020. It considers the available quantitative data and broad numbers relating to relevant cases in this period, before examining the substance of its judgments and decisions in greater depth. It describes the areas in which Strasbourg’s approach has been bold, and those areas in which its output is characterised by caution or even avoidance. The picture which emerges is therefore not a straightforward one. However, one notable and important change which emerges from the data seems to be the speed with which applications against the UK are dealt with.

Open Access
In: European Convention on Human Rights Law Review

Abstract

How should rapid developments in digital and cyber technology shape our understanding of the Responsibility to Protect (R2P)? And in operationalising the doctrine, how might insights on the impact of technology be integrated within key tools of R2P implementation, such as the United Nations Framework of Analysis for Atrocity Crimes? Although prior literature has produced rich discussion of R2P as a norm, and of the politics surrounding it, analysts have paid ‘far less attention to what R2P looks like in practice’, especially with regard to advances in new technology. In this article we contend that, whether we look at the future of R2P through a normative/legal lens, or from a policy/operational perspective, grappling with the impact of technology on the practical realities of mass atrocity situations is of critical importance. To explore this argument, we empirically engage with one of the primary tools through which the implementation of R2P has benefited, the UN Framework of Analysis on Atrocity Crimes (unfaac).

Open Access
In: Global Responsibility to Protect
In: Faith in Law, Law in Faith
In: Faith in Law, Law in Faith
In: Faith in Law, Law in Faith
In: Faith in Law, Law in Faith