Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 141 items for :

  • Multilingualism & Language Contact x
  • Upcoming Publications x
  • Just Published x
  • Access: Open Access x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
Author:

Abstract

This article provides qualitative and quantitative analyses of variable gender agreement in Correntino Spanish, the variety of Spanish spoken by both Spanish-Guarani bilinguals and Correntino Spanish monolinguals in the province of Corrientes, Argentina. Drawing on data collected from fieldwork in the province, it will be shown that this variation is conditioned by distance effects and modifier class. Synchronic gender agreement variation in Correntino Spanish is attributed to diachronic source language agentivity effects () given the lack of gender inflection in Guarani. This phenomenon would be unsurprising as a contact effect if found synchronically only in bilinguals; however, its occurrence in monolinguals sets it aside as a rare instance of variable gender agreement in monolingual Spanish. This loosening of gender agreement mirrors the development of gender in Argentine Guarani (), and these phenomena taken together shed light on the malleability of gender systems under situations of intense language contact. Together they provide a valuable example of mutual contact-induced changes in gender systems.

Open Access
In: Journal of Language Contact

Abstract

Four Portuguese-based Creoles are spoken on the islands in the Gulf of Guinea: Santome, Angolar, Lung’Ie, and Fa d’Ambô. These languages are descendants of the Portuguese-based Gulf of Guinea Proto-Creole, which emerged at the beginning of the sixteenth century on São Tomé Island. Based on , we discuss the development of liquid consonants in Santome, Lung’Ie, Angolar and Fa d’Ambô using data from the reconstruction, and we examine the developments in the daughter-languages of the proto-phonemes *r and *l that led to the synchronic systems and the present configurations in the daughter languages, since the liquid consonants evolved differently from the proto-creole. We show that the relation between long vowels and liquid consonants, both in coda and in complex onsets, can be better understood if we consider the modern lexical items in these four languages as continuations of proto-forms, with characteristic modifications in each language governed by regular processes.

Open Access
In: Journal of Language Contact
Author:

Abstract

This article is a continuation of the analysis of the Karaim -p edi- past tense presented, for the first time in scholarly literature, in . In the latter paper, this verbal category was described on the basis of a few South-Western Karaim examples, only, and was termed plusquamperfectum ii . In this paper the description of its semantic scope has been refined based on an analysis of recently discovered North- and South-Western Karaim examples as well as on a further evaluation of Turkic (including Eastern Karaim) data. Importantly, it is argued that the practice of (also) expressing habitual events by means of this verbal category (which is quite an unusual feature in the Turkic linguistic world) is a consequence of contact-linguistic factors, namely the influence of the Polish language, in which Western Karaims were (and still are) proficient. Finally, to obtain a complete picture of its evolution the -p edi- pluperfect is placed in the broader context of the Karaim past tense system. Following and , this paper is the third in a series of articles introducing previously undocumented grammatical categories of Western Karaim.

Open Access
In: Journal of Language Contact
Author:

Abstract

This paper provides a comparative analysis of word-final nasals in Yucatecan Spanish and Yucatec Maya based on speech data from Quintana Roo (Mexico). In Yucatecan Spanish, a nasal is often pronounced as [m] if placed at the end of a word (e.g., Yucatá[m] instead of Yucatá[n]). Since this phenomenon is widespread on the Yucatán Peninsula, but largely unknown in other Spanish-speaking regions, it is often linked to the influence of the indigenous language Yucatec Maya. Our Spanish dataset differs from our Yucatec Mayan one in that the labialization rate significantly increases with the length of the subsequent pause in the former, but not in the latter. Thus, even if the feature was originally transferred from Yucatec Maya to Spanish, it seems that it has taken on a life of its own in Yucatecan Spanish, determined by its function as a marker of prosodic prominence.

Open Access
In: Journal of Language Contact

Abstract

Basque is the only non-Indo-European language in western Europe. This fact, and particularly its ergative alignment, make its morphosyntactic structure and its verb different from those of Standard Average European. However, the massive and prolonged influence which Basque has received first from Latin and later from Romance has conditioned the layout of the analytic vps (the open type) in a very curious way. Since Basque synthetic verbs have a template of the type S-vb.root for intransitives and O-vb.root-A for transitives, as opposed to vb.root-A/S for any kind of verb in sae, lexical borrowing of verbs from Latin was impossible. A solution arose when the old periphrastic resultative perfect was grammaticalized in Late Latin as the primary expression of the perfect. This form distinguished intransitive and transitive verbs, so it served as an entry point for Latin and Romance verbal lexicon into Basque, by means of autochthonous auxiliaries.

Open Access
In: Journal of Language Contact

Abstract

Macanese, the near-extinct Portuguese creole of Macao, is an Asian Portuguese Creole language closely related to Malaccan Papia Kristang. In this paper, I argue that a distinctive feature of Macanese vis-à-vis other Asian Portuguese Creoles is its system of negation; specifically, its usage of the negators nunca and nádi. Negators deriving from Portuguese nunca ‘never’ and não há-de ‘shall not’ are attested in several Asian Portuguese Creoles: while their usage varies considerably, the former usually acts as the negator for realis predicates, whereas the latter typically negates irrealis predicates. In this paper I argue that, differently from other Asian Portuguese Creoles, Macanese nunca is also the only available negator for adjectival and nominal predicates, independently from tam features. Through a comparison with other Asian Portuguese creoles, and with the adstrates and substrates of Macanese, I also discuss the possible origin of these features.

Open Access
In: Journal of Language Contact
Authors: and

Abstract

This paper investigates the lexical similarities and formation of neologisms of two written standard varieties of Karelian, North and Livvi Karelian, spoken in the Republic of Karelia, Russia. Firstly, a naïve Bayes statistical model was generated to classify North and Livvi Karelian newspaper texts automatically. Secondly, the word formation strategies of neologisms from the classified newspaper texts were studied. The strategies between the two varieties were compared in terms of the code-copying framework. The results from the automatic classification and the investigation of neologisms show that the standards differ in lexicon and phonology, but the strategies of forming neologisms are similar: the most common strategy is to form words by language-internal means, and the other strategies are selective and global copying from Finnish, Russian, and English. The similar strategies in both standards suggest similar language planning.

Open Access
In: Journal of Language Contact
In: Journal of Language Contact

Abstract

The main aim of this study is to examine what kind of phonological system emerges because of language contact wherein adult speakers of L1 (Chinese) attempt to speak L2 (Russian) without any previous instruction in L2. The main findings of this study are as follows: a) The speakers of L1 largely adopt the phonetic inventory and phonotactics of L2 and b) the only underlying (distinctive) features in the emerging phonological system are those of place of articulation while voicing plays no distinctive role in the emerging phonological system of Chinese speakers. Moreover, the speakers of L1 faithfully replicate the stress system of L2, even though L1 (Chinese) is a tonal language and L2, Russian, is a stress language. The most important finding of this study is that speakers of L1 discern the entity ‘word’ in L2. The emerging phonological system is geared towards assuring the identifiability of words in L2 rather than towards consistency of phonological rules.

Open Access
In: Journal of Language Contact