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Abstract

Neurobiology depicts the human brain as the organ of intellect. It has located in the brain the stations for cognition (e.g., sight and hearing) and for feelings and experience (e.g., pain, anger and face recognition). It has even sited in the brain the places involved in moral functions (e.g., judgement and lies). However, the locale of the self itself has escaped from it; so has the one assigned with ontological questions. The Quran invites its reader to seek knowledge and apply reason; however, it never introduces a term for the instrument of knowing, the brain. Instead, the intellectual roles are attributed to the heart and chest, a position that allows for a literal interpretation of these artefacts in the Book. The foundational objective of this work is to appraise this interpretation in the light of the lessons drawn from scientific studies. More than simply acknowledging the pre-knowledge of the Quran of some new scientific findings, this research seeks to re-appraise the meanings of the relevant Quranic ayahs in view of those findings. It reveals the literal significance of the terms ‘heart’ and ‘chest’ used in the Scripture but in a different context and also shows that Quranic depictions of neurobiological concepts are prescient. It finds the Quran furnishing a fuller picture of the intellect. It shows that a physical depiction of human intellect in the Quran is not only possible but indispensable. Importantly, this example yet again identifies the scope of the Quranic ayahs for fulfilling current multidisciplinary needs.

Open Access
In: Al-Bayan: Journal of Qur'an and Hadith Studies
From its Hijazi Origins to its Classical Reading Traditions
What was the language of the Quran like, and how do we know? Today, the Quran is recited in ten different reading traditions, whose linguistic details are mutually incompatible. This work uncovers the earliest linguistic layer of the Quran. It demonstrates that the text was composed in the Hijazi vernacular dialect, and that in the centuries that followed different reciters started to classicize the text to a new linguistic ideal, the ideal of the ʿarabiyyah. This study combines data from ancient Quranic manuscripts, the medieval Arabic grammarians and ample data from the Quranic reading traditions to arrive at new insights into the linguistic history of Quranic Arabic.
In: Quranic Arabic
In: Quranic Arabic
In: Quranic Arabic
In: Quranic Arabic
In: Quranic Arabic
In: Quranic Arabic
In: Quranic Arabic
In: Quranic Arabic