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Abstract

My aim is to forge a feel for the importance of building critical understandings of common forms of engagement with disability and in this way work against the careless-care that seems to surround the ways disability-experience is managed in education. First, I discuss what this interpretive dse approach entails. Second, I narrate being in the University classroom with my dyslexic ways and counterpose this to “access statements” on course outlines which are now a common occurrence in the Canadian context. I then conduct an interpretive analysis of the meaning of disability as it appears through my personal story and these bureaucratic statements of inclusion. Despite these differing instances of inclusion, I show how both maintain the status quo of university work-life. Through a politics of wonder, this paper aims to invigorate life affirming relations where disability might figure as something other than a pharmakon for the status quo.

Open Access
In: Journal of Disability Studies in Education

Abstract

Zbiva is an open access online research data base for the archaeology of the Eastern Alps in the Early Middle Ages. The data base is the product of four decades of thoughtful digital curation and is continually evolving at the data record level. As such, it is best described by the concept of Deep Data. The authors deposited a subset of the Zbiva data base in a persistent open access repository, Zenodo. This was necessary to ensure stable reference, facilitate the reproducibility of the results, and promote data reuse in their ongoing publication efforts. The deposited data cover the period from 500 to 1000 ce and are spatially restricted to present-day Slovenia, southern Austria, and a small part of north-eastern Italy. The data set is particularly suitable for archaeological gis analyses.

Open Access
In: Research Data Journal for the Humanities and Social Sciences
Author:

Abstract

Scholarly debate concerning the judicial review of parliamentary proceedings has mainly focused on the constitutional principles in the light of which such a review should be excluded/grounded/limited. However, the equilibrium point between these principles remains elusive. This essay does not attempt to resolve this issue, since appropriate solutions can differ greatly from one legal order to another. Moreover, this being a matter of balance, a solution cannot be given once and for all, even domestically.

Instead, this essay aims to enrich existing studies, suggesting a methodology for viewing (and critically analysing) the equilibrium point in a domestic setting. First, however, supranational/international ‘constitutional’ principles should also be considered. Some examples of case-law (mainly concerning Italy) will be given. Secondly, such a balance should be viewed within the theoretical framework of the specific system of constitutional justice established domestically (i.e. types of standards, acts to be reviewed, jurisdictional disputes, subjects that can initiate disputes, violations of the Constitution). The validity of this second approach is then proved as it relates to Italy.

Open Access
In: International Journal of Parliamentary Studies

Abstract

The term “water diplomacy” has gained currency among policy makers and academics. It reflects an awareness that the use, management, and protection of transboundary water resources is intrinsically political and often embedded in complex political settings. Based on a review of academic and policy documents, we analyze the variety of understandings and common patterns in the definition of water diplomacy. We also analyze tools, tracks, and levels through which and at which water diplomacy is conducted or analyzed. With our own definition of water diplomacy as deliberative political processes and practices of preventing, mitigating, and resolving disputes over transboundary water resources and developing joint water governance arrangements by applying foreign policy means which are embedded in bi- and/or multilateral relations beyond the water sector and taking place at different tracks and scales, we aim to advance the discourse on water diplomacy both in the academic and policy realms.

Open Access
In: Diplomatica

Abstract

Hand in hand with policy developments, educational practices are constantly looking for how teachers can be (better) supported and professionalized in dealing with pupils with specific educational needs in regular education. Supporting and strengthening the competences of teachers in dealing with diverse needs is closely related to the question of connective collaboration within inclusive learning environments. But when is collaboration connective?

In this ethnographic study, we set out using research material that succeeds in giving form and substance to connective collaboration within Alex’s inclusion process. By means of a diffractive analysis, four helpful and necessary developments emerge: four doing words that emphasize a process that is never complete. ‘Purposefully encountering’, ‘exchanging’, ‘negotiating’ and ‘affirming’ encourage a continuous development towards connection in the interaction between Alex, his individually adapted curriculum (iac), the classroom environment, his family and all education and welfare actors involved.

Open Access
In: Journal of Disability Studies in Education
Authors: and

Abstract

This article shares disabled students’ experiences of ableism, discrimination, and exclusion while navigating university life. Drawing upon these experiences, we argue that many of the ordinary systems and assumptions that govern university life often materialise as barriers for disabled students. Introducing the concept of ‘backdoor accessibility,’ this paper examines exclusionary practices and systemic ableism to propose that disabled students are routinely offered a lesser quality service that is argued to be ‘better than nothing.’ In order to navigate these barriers, many students reported the additional expenditure of time, resources and energy. In this article, we explore these barriers and strategies within the framework of affect theory and pay attention to the diverse ways that university life can limit or enhance the affective possibility of disabled students. In conclusion, this article makes some recommendations as suggested by disabled students as potential avenues to overcome disabling structures in higher education.

Open Access
In: Journal of Disability Studies in Education

Abstract

Portraits of the Roman emperors have been a focal point in the study of the ancient world. However, questions on how this medium developed over time and/or how perceptions of the emperor changed over more than four centuries of imperial rule, are constrained by the availability and accessibility of the material. This article introduces the Roman Imperial Portraits Dataset (ripd) to allow researchers to study the portraiture of Roman emperors through a more quantitative approach (). The dataset has systematically brought together more than 2,100 extant (i.e. published) portraits of the Roman emperors into a single dataset that can be used for further study. The article also introduces a web application with the aim to allow researchers and interested parties to work with the data(set) in an user-friendly manner.

Open Access
In: Research Data Journal for the Humanities and Social Sciences

Abstract

This paper examines how inherency, established in statements universities produce asserting the core abilities necessary to enter and qualify for their degrees, connects with employment in accredited professions, creating barriers for people with disabilities and related conditions. There is no consistent definition of inherent requirements (ir s) across higher education internationally. To assist the ongoing development of ir s, our discussion is set out across three parts. We start by reviewing the origins of ir s highlighting an inconsistency in form and content across the sector. We then provide an analysis of two ir statements from actual institutions noting how they position disability, ability, and the competencies deemed inherent to teaching and learning. Finally, we examine areas where governance and policy, teaching and learning, and employability, can potentially change how ir s are deployed in future practice. Our goal is to shift academic and work-related requirements beyond inherent possessive limitations to coherent performative prospects.

Open Access
In: Journal of Disability Studies in Education
Author:

Abstract

Psychopathy was one of the most common diagnoses in Finnish forensic psychiatric examinations between the 1910s and 1960s. Abnormal categories of emotions such as sensitivity, indifference and the tendency to shift among different emotions or lability, were among the principal symptoms of psychopathy. This paper describes and analyses the ways in which Finnish forensic psychiatrists between the 1900s and 1930s perceived and portrayed the emotions of individuals they considered to be psychopaths, and how abnormal categories of emotions persisted until the end of the 1960s. Psychopathic categories of emotions were defined along a spectrum ranging between the extremes of sensitivity and of coldness and included volatility, which entailed rapid mood swings. Displaying either or both extremes of emotion defined psychopathy. The unifying category of abnormal emotions disappeared when the diagnosis of psychopathy ceased to exist in 1969, when it was replaced by the diagnostic category of personality disorders.

Open Access
In: Emotions: History, Culture, Society
Author:

Abstract

With the revival of Gothic ecclesiastical architecture in nineteenth-century Britain, a cultural interest in church furnishings reignited alongside intellectual attention to their symbolic and emotive power. Rood screens, in particular, became both a symbolic and literal locus for the production of awe, mystery and revelation. The primitive interpretation of rood screens both exalted the object symbolically and allowed it to activate the spiritual senses by limiting physical sight to the altar, thus preserving the mysteries of the Eucharist. This essay considers how rood screen controversies during the mid-Victorian period unveil complex relationships between emotion, revelation and sight within Gothic Revival church interiors.

Open Access
In: Emotions: History, Culture, Society