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Abstract

In 2019, the Mondragon worker cooperatives, which number around 100, employed over 81 000 workers. Based primarily on information from the Mondragon annual reports, this article traces Mondragon’s employment record from 1983–2019. In this period its Spanish employment growth outran that of Spain by a factor of 3.4, and that of the aggregated oecd countries by a factor of 6.3. On top of the Spanish employment, Mondragon cooperatives’ subsidiaries employed about 4300 workers abroad (7% of the total) in 2001, and about 14 500 (18% of the total) in 2019. The article expands on the reasons for this last type of employment. The article also explains why the proportion of cooperative owner-members in the total employment varies over time. Depending on the sector, in 2019 this proportion is 32–45%, and measured as a proportion of the employment in cooperatives 32–74%—the difference being engendered by non-cooperative subsidiaries. Many cooperatives regard these proportions as second-best practices in the search for a modus between competitive pressures and the maintenance of employment within cooperatives.

Open Access
In: Journal of Labor and Society
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Abstract

The last fifteen years witnessed a remarkable revitalization in the field of Second International historiography. This renewed literature put forward different approaches and perspectives, as the interest for the history of social democracy draws on academic as well as political considerations. Whereas an important trend of this revitalization came from studies that focused on social and cultural aspects, this review explores two recent volumes published by North American authors that propose a different, and explicitly political, approach towards the history of social democracy in the years of the Second International.

Open Access
In: Journal of Labor and Society
What is money? What is capital? The Spectre of Capital tackles such fundamental questions at a deep philosophical level. It argues that the modern world is ruled by a ‘spectre’, the spectre of capital. This insight is rooted in an original combination of the ideas of Marx and Hegel. It presents the most sophisticated argument to date for ‘the homology thesis’, namely that the order of Hegel’s logical categories, and that of the social forms addressed by Marx’s Capital, share the same architectonic. The systematic-dialectical presentation shows how capital becomes a self-sustaining power.
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Abstract

This paper is delivered from a conceptual theoretical review of grey literature: identifying key concepts and pragmatic policy interventions, which are required to address various aspects of the digital workforce. The main objective and purpose of this study is to analyze then articulate how technological panopticism, digital surveillance has changed the world of work. The study alerts us to the significant changes in work relations, which have been imposed by the digital age. At a nascent level society is asked to consider; how prepared are we to address the effects of technological panopticism on the mental (and physical) wellbeing of digital workers. On a nuanced basis the study fulfils another societal role: acting to introduce consideration of the digital surveillance aspects of how interaction with artificial intelligence and/or the internet of things could develop in the 2020s.

Open Access
In: Journal of Labor and Society
In: The Spectre of Capital: Idea and Reality
In: The Spectre of Capital: Idea and Reality
In: The Spectre of Capital: Idea and Reality
In: The Spectre of Capital: Idea and Reality
In: The Spectre of Capital: Idea and Reality
In: The Spectre of Capital: Idea and Reality