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Abstract

This study explored the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on mental health of companion animal guardians. First, the extent to which emotional responses to COVID-19 predicted mental health outcomes was explored. Support from companion animals and humans as potential moderators of observed relationships between emotional responses and mental health was then investigated. Using data collected from 895 guardians, it was found that guardians experienced a range of positive and negative emotional responses. Regression analyses revealed that these responses predicted mental health outcomes. Negative emotional responses and loneliness showed a positive relationship with stress, anxiety, and depression, while positive emotional responses showed a negative relationship with stress and depression. Emotional closeness with companion animals, but not support from humans, moderated the relationship between negative emotional responses and both stress and anxiety, suggesting that when guardians experienced distress during the pandemic, they may have relied on companion animals for support.

Open Access
In: Society & Animals
Author:

Abstract

During the 16th century, the term “Cemilhuitlapohualtepoztli” meant “clock” to the indigenous peoples of Mexico. They had formed this neologism out of three words from the Nahual language: “cemilhui” (the passing of a day); “tlapoaliztli” (to count); and “tepoztli” (bell or iron). This linguistic evidence, in conjunction with other documents found in Spanish and Latin American archives, show that autochthonous people came into early contact with these mechanisms and promptly assimilated quantified time. Historiography often claims that the Catholic Church imposed this kind of time among indigenous societies, however, this paper demonstrates that indigenous peoples appropriated a more precise and quantified time in the offices of the colonial administration, either by working as clockmakers or by producing “timetables” and calendars. This process allowed, on the one hand, the global synchrony between the Old and the New World, and on the other hand, the coordination of collective temporalities and local calendars.

Open Access
In: KronoScope

Abstract

Due to its reliance on meat, the companion animals’ food industry significantly contributes to environmental problems. Despite these environmental implications, little is known about the relative importance that caregivers attach to environmental concerns in their evaluation of companion animals’ food products. Study 1 (N = 317) showed that perceived nutritional value predicted whether caregivers were interested in plant-based dog food products, while pro-environmental identification did not impact the findings. In Studies 2 (N = 460) and 3 (N = 194), the promoted benefits of a fictitious dog food product were manipulated. Findings revealed that perceived health benefits rather than perceived environmental benefits were the main determinant of product interest. Together, these findings suggest that environmental concerns play a limited role in people’s views of companion animals’ food products. It is therefore important to address concerns about the health impacts of companion animals’ food products with plant-based content.

Open Access
In: Society & Animals
Author:

Abstract

This article examines the Russian invasion of Ukraine from the perspectives of Russian ideology, the tools used by the Russian Federation in the war against Ukraine, and refugee-making. The article uses offensive realism as an approach to understanding the actions of Russia against Ukraine. Russian full-scale aggression against Ukraine in February 2022 provoked international crises in numerous dimensions: political, security, humanitarian, and ecological. It became not only a war between countries, but a war between ways of thinking and ideologies. The reasoning and international policies behind this war might have very different and controversial interpretations; however, some explanation can be found by analyzing Russian inner-political discourse during the last two decades and the development of Russian ideology. The key research question of the article concerns the issue of Russian ideology and its role in Russia’s full-scale invasion of Ukraine.

Open Access
In: Innovation in the Social Sciences
Author:

Abstract

This article explores the education-related experiences of Vietnamese immigrant women in Taiwan. The author adopts a qualitative methodology, utilizing semi-structured interviews, followed by a constant comparative analysis. Three core themes are unearthed: the participants’ learning experiences, the process of meaning-making, and the multidimensional impacts of their education. Key findings include the effort invested by participants in obtaining familial support to pursue their education and the learning challenges posed by language barriers. Furthermore, the pursuit of education is found to extend to deeper aspects of self-identity, encompassing motherhood and empowerment. This article illustrates how higher education can facilitate better employment and enhance societal integration and intra-familial power dynamics for immigrant women. Its impact is not unilateral but spans multiple dimensions of their lives in their host society. The insights gained from this article indicate a need for broader, comparative, and diverse research to understand experiences across other immigrant communities in Taiwan.

Open Access
In: Innovation in the Social Sciences

Abstract

In light of the evolving post-COVID-19 global development agenda, this article delves into the conceptualization of resilience within the creative economy as portrayed in public discourse. Using media analysis, the article scrutinizes discourse patterns evident in Jawa Pos, Indonesia’s premier media outlet, from 2020 to 2021. The insights presented are corroborated by a comprehensive literature review and an examination of official government reports. This study examines seven creative industries that dominated public discourse during the pandemic: games, software applications, film, video production, art performance, culinary arts, and crafts. Digital platforms have invigorated sectors such as gaming, culinary arts, crafts, and video content; furthermore, local tourism initiatives have been instrumental in catalysing economic rejuvenation in areas such as the culinary arts, crafts, and art performance. This analysis encourages further studies on the resilience of the creative economy.

Open Access
In: Innovation in the Social Sciences
Author:

Abstract

In Sheila Burnford’s 1961 novel The Incredible Journey, three domestic animals undertake an arduous trek through the forests of northern Ontario to be reunited with their owners and family. As an example of “homing instinct” stories, The Incredible Journey has been influential, notably as a result of the 1963 Disney film. The genre is easily dismissed as sentimentally anthropomorphic, but this paper treats Burnford’s novel as a sophisticated treatment of animals’ mobilities in terms of literary animal studies. Drawing on the philosophy of Henri Bergson, The Incredible Journey is presented as an adventure in time rather than in space, contrasting the human perspective of maps and miles with the Bergsonian concept of duration, the real experience of the passage of time, and with related themes of free will, instinct, and desire. This paper concludes that Burnford offers a less anthropocentric perspective on animals’ mobility.

Open Access
In: Society & Animals

Abstract

Dog-walking contributes positively to the wellbeing of humans; however, there is little evidence about any wellbeing benefits of dog-walking for “non-guardians.” We use the terminology “borrowers” to refer to non-guardians who borrow dogs to walk and “loaners” to refer to guardians who loan their dogs. In this qualitatively driven, mixed-methods study, we explored dog-walking and wellbeing for a sample of nine borrowers and four loaners. Data were collected from dog-walk-along interviews and participatory analysis sessions with borrowers, seated interviews with loaners, and supplementary questionnaires. Wellbeing of borrowers and loaners was analyzed using an existing theoretical model, Therapeutic Dog-walking Spaces, which led to two themes: “Balancing Wellbeing and Responsibility” and “Wellbeing and Trust.” Two novel theoretical spaces were identified: a “dog-space” and a “shaper space,” to further account for the role of borrowers and illustrate the active role that dogs and “shapers” like policymakers might play in enhancing therapeutic dog-walking spaces.

Open Access
In: Society & Animals

Abstract

Various philosophical systems have been applied to questions of nonhuman animal ethics, but the ancient Cynics have been ignored despite their close association with dogs and their commitment to philosophy as a way of life. After explaining the neglect and clearing away some obstacles to treating Cynic ethics seriously, this article looks closely at Cynic shamelessness and its connection with conventions that may fail to withstand critical scrutiny. It then goes on to discuss Diogenes’ relationship with food conventions and explores what ancient Cynicism has to offer when it comes to thinking through virtuous relationships between humans and other animals.

Open Access
In: Society & Animals
Experiences and Approaches from a Pan-European Perspective
Placemaking has become a key concept in many disciplines. Due to an increase in digitization, mobilities, migration and rapid changes to the urban environments, it is important to learn how planning and social experts practice it in different contexts. Placemaking in Practice provides an inventory of practices, reflecting on different issues related to placemaking from a pan European perspective. It brings different cases, perspectives, and results analysed under the same purpose, to advance knowledge on placemaking, the actors engaged and results for people. It is backed by an intensive review of recent literature on placemaking, engagement, methods and activism results - towards developing a new placemaking agenda. Placemaking in Practice combines theory, methodology, methods (including digital ones) and their application in a pan-European context and imbedded into a relevant historical context.

Contributors are: Branislav Antonić, Tatisiana Astrouskaya,Lucija Ažman Momirski, Anna Louise Bradley, Lucia Brisudová, Monica Bocci, David Buil-Gil, Nevena Dakovic, Alexandra Delgado Jiménez, Despoina Dimelli, Aleksandra Djukic, Nika Đuho, Agisilaos Economou, Ayse Erek, Mastoureh Fathi, Juan A. García-Esparza, Gilles Gesquiere, Nina Goršič, Preben Hansen, Carola Hein, Conor Horan, Erna Husukić, Kinga Kimic, Roland Krebs, Jelena Maric, Edmond Manahasa, Laura Martinez-Izquierdo, Marluci Menezes, Tim Mavric, Bahanaur Nasya, Mircea Negru, Matej Nikšič, Jelena Maric, Paulina Polko, Clara Julia Reich, Francesco Rotondo, Ljiljana Rogac Mijatovi, Tatiana Ruchinskaya, Carlos Smaniotto Costa, Miloslav Šerý, Reka Solymosi, Dina Stober, Juli Székely, Nagayamma Tavares Aragão, Piero Tiano, Cor Wagenaar, and Emina Zejnilović