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Abstract

This article aims to explain the emigration of wealthy Chinese citizens after the 2012 political leadership change, with reference to Hirschman’s model. It builds on the concepts of loyalty and exit in the context of an authoritarian regime with rapid economic growth, to offer insights into the self-declared reasons behind the emigration of these people from China. Based on evidence from 25 semi-structured interviews conducted in 2021 with Chinese emigrants, the analysis outlines the intricate interplay between economic opportunities and the level of control within an authoritarian regime as a cause for emigration.

Open Access
In: Diaspora Studies

Abstract

Since 1980, most states have granted voting rights to citizens living abroad. Although cross-national research focuses on when and where emigrant enfranchisement occurs, there has been little systematic attention to the variation in how enfranchisement occurs (for example, by constitutional amendment) and who extends these rights (international actors, for example). We argue that the variation in legal modalities and political actors is important for understanding why enfranchisement occurs and helps to account for the subsequent institutional inclusion—and exclusion—of emigrant voters. Using an original dataset which documents every extension of non-citizen voting rights (n = 153), we uncover variations in legal processes, regionally and over time. Although legislation is the most common enfranchisement pathway, judiciaries have become increasingly involved since 2000, particularly in Asian and African countries. Furthermore, emigrant enfranchisements involving constitutional reforms or plebiscites tend to be the most durable, whereas enfranchisements by international agreement are most prone to policy reversals.

Open Access
In: Diaspora Studies
Author:

Abstract

This paper provides a comprehensive overview of the literature concerning a crucial link that unites mainland China, Hong Kong and overseas Chinese communities. The Tung Wah Group of Hospitals, a charitable organisation based in Hong Kong, played a key role in the facilitation of the repatriation of the remains of individuals of Chinese descent living abroad. This paper places special emphasis on the value of archival records released by the Tung Wah Group of Hospitals. It proposes the pursuit of interdisciplinary research and underscores the necessity for comprehensive investigations that encompass publications in different languages. To enhance our understanding of the repatriation of deceased overseas Chinese individuals, there is a resounding need for expanded initiatives to collect and preserve primary historical sources. Comparative studies on burial practices across different regions are also recommended. Such pursuits will offer new insights into the history of overseas Chinese communities.

Open Access
In: Diaspora Studies
Alternatives and Sustainable Futures
The frontiers of extraction are expanding rapidly, driven by a growing demand for minerals and metals that is often motivated by sustainability considerations. Two volumes of International Development Policy are dedicated to the paradoxes and futures of green extractivism, with analyses of experiences from five continents. In this, the second of the two volumes, the 22 authors, using different conceptual approaches and in different empirical contexts, demonstrate the alarming obduracy of the logic of extractivism, even - and perhaps especially - in the growing support for the so-called green transition. The authors highlight the complex and enduring legacies of resource extraction and the urgent need to move beyond extractive models of development towards alternative pathways that prioritise social justice, environmental sustainability, democratic governance and the well-being of both humans and non-humans. They also caution us against the assumption that anti-extraction is anti-extractivist, that post-extraction is post-extractivism, and they critically attune us to the systemic nature of extractivism in ways that both connect and transcend any particular site or scale.

This volume accompanies IDP 15, The Lives of Extraction: Identities, Communities, and the Politics of Place.
Identities, Communities and the Politics of Place
The frontiers of extraction are expanding rapidly, driven by a growing demand for minerals and metals that is often motivated by sustainability considerations. Two volumes of International Development Policy are dedicated to the paradoxes and futures of green extractivism, with analyses of experiences from five continents. In this, the first of these two volumes, 16 authors offer a critical and nuanced understanding of the social, cultural and political dimensions of extraction. The experiences of communities, indigenous peoples and workers in extractive contexts are deeply shaped by narratives, imaginaries and the complexity of social contexts. These dimensions are crucial to making extraction possible and to sustaining its expansion, but also to identifying possibilities for resistance, and to paving the way for alternative, post-extractive economies.

This volume is accompanied by IDP 16, The Afterlives of Extraction: Alternatives and Sustainable Futures.
Author:

Abstract

As the ecological crisis grows more intense, youth research must attune itself to the ongoing climate emergency marked by mass extinction, the era of pandemics and world political turmoil. How can youth research participate in finding solutions to the dilemmas involved in achieving sustainable development and the well-being of all living things and beings, and of the planet itself? This article presents a new framework for youth research: planetary youth research. It is structured in accordance with the four pillars of the ‘global ethical framework’ outlined by the Club of Rome in 1974 in its second report, Mankind at the Turning Point: 1) One must learn to identify with future generations; 2) A universal consciousness must be created; 3) Humanity’s relationship with nature should be based on harmony; and 4) A new ethic for the use of raw materials must be created. This article outlines a new framework for planetary youth research by expanding and updating these historical pillars through the application of current trends and findings in youth research and social science research.

Open Access
In: Youth and Globalization

Abstract

Drawing on the analysis of biographical interviews with Brazilian activists, this article explores youth activism in radical right movements as a challenge to and indicator of 21st-century democratic transformation through the lens of youth participation studies. In recognition of the symbolic boundaries that institutionalized discourses of democratic youth participation produce, participation in radical right movements is analysed as a case of ‘liminal participation’. The article begins with a brief overview of the literature on youth participation in radical right movements in Brazil and Europe, with a focus on how the concept of ‘liminal participation’ can be used to analyse it. We then reconstruct four biographies and discuss how liminality emerges as a strategy and a negotiation status, related to processes of youth politicization. Finally, the findings are related to a broader reflection on democracy and participation in a society of risks in which conflict and antagonism play a central role.

Open Access
In: Youth and Globalization

Abstract

This article analyses the collaboration between the French external services and the Egyptian government of President Sissi. In a first part, it recounts the revelations of the Disclose journalists in 2021 and their interview with an anonymous source, as well as the follow-up investigation in 2023 by the European Consortium of Independent Journalists. In the second part, the two authors comment on the relationship between data cooperation and counter-terrorism activities, the way in which the sale of arms and spying tools undermines the legitimacy of cooperation, and the way in which the French government has used the argument of defence of secrecy to prevent investigative journalists from investigating the issue.

Open Access
In: Political Anthropological Research on International Social Sciences (PARISS)

Abstract

In this article, the authors mobilize the concept of affective ambiguity in order to explore the epistemological and structural incompatibilities that collaboration implies in the context of the highly asymmetrical relationships of power within and beyond neoliberal academia. They show that collaborations between university-based anthropologists at different stages of their careers and the groups and communities they seek to collaborate with are governed by mutually contradictory value frameworks. These value frameworks are shaped by the structural inequalities of these constellations and by diverging temporalities, socialities, and expectations that tend to make such collaborations unsustainable. Drawing on their own involvement in Kollektiv Polylog, a collective of refugee women, lecturers, former students, and activists in and beyond Berlin that are working together in the context of various publication, teaching, and video projects, the authors highlight the affective, temporal, and material resources that all actors need to invest in order to make collaboration productive.

Open Access
In: Public Anthropologist
Authors: and

Abstract

Collaborations and contestations have always been present in collaborative research, and many case studies illustrate related conundrums. Yet, we argue that the concrete challenges emerging within dynamics of collaborations and contestations deserve much more focused attention, especially in contexts of publicly engaged anthropological work. This essay introduces a special issue of seven highly diverse contributions that are all animated by, and oriented towards, this common concern. Against the backdrop of situating this problematique within broader developments in increasingly diverse anthropologies of recent decades, we discuss the different contributions in light of their specific insights regarding collaborations and contestations. Based on these fine-grained case studies, we draw four transversal conclusions that we see as relevant also for publicly engaged anthropologies beyond the individual contributions that are assembled here.

Open Access
In: Public Anthropologist