Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 147 items for :

  • Asian Philosophy x
  • Upcoming Publications x
  • Upcoming Publications x
  • Just Published x
  • Access: Open Access x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
Author:

Abstract

The novel Coming through Slaughter (1976), a story of a talented musician’s pursuit of real art and the true self, is based on Buddy Bolden, a jazz cornet player from New Orleans, Louisiana, in early twentieth-century America. Author Michael Ondaatje shows his originality in creating a ‘jazz novel’ that transcends the boundary between music and literature, in which three jazz-like features – collage, improvisation, and intersubjectivity – are embodied in characterization, theme presentation, and narration. By virtue of the unique free elements of jazz, Ondaatje maximizes the postmodern features of the novel and vividly depicts the complex subjectivity of the characters.

Open Access
In: Signs and Media

Abstract

This article explains a new ‘foreignizing’ approach to translation that was invented in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, especially by Herder and Schleiermacher, and that has since become the predominant approach in translation theory. The article argues that despite the great virtues of this approach, it was based on an unduly narrow restriction to Indo-European languages, which leaves considerable room for further improvement. Greater attention to Hebrew has since made up this deficit to a certain extent. But Chinese holds the potential for even more important refinements of the original theory. The article explains the original theorists’ failure to exploit this case in terms of a certain prejudice against Chinese language and culture that had arisen at the time, and for which these theorists were themselves partly responsible. It then tries to show in some detail how deeply enriching for the theory a consideration of Chinese can be.

Open Access
In: Journal of Chinese Philosophy

Abstract

This paper attempts to rearrange the slip sequence in the Wang Ji 妄稽 manuscript, and makes the following suggestions: slips 75–76 should be placed immediately after slips 47, 48, and 49; slips 77–81 should be placed between slips 75–76 and slips 43–46; since the meaning of the text on slip 46 and that on slip 62 are coherent, slips 46 and 62 can be placed back-to-back.

Open Access
In: Bamboo and Silk

Abstract

In light of recent advances made in research on the Yuelu Academy Qin Wei li zhi guan ji qianshou manuscript, the present article reconsiders issues surrounding the manuscript’s slip order and the reading of its text. A new arrangement is given, with two missing slips restored to the manuscript, an additional fragment re-pieced together, and an explanation provided for the logic behind the overall organization of the text’s content.

Open Access
In: Bamboo and Silk

Abstract

By rejoining several fragmentary slips in the Shanghai Museum *Shi Liu wen yu Fuzi manuscript, this article seeks to adjust the order of the existing bamboo slips as well as to clarify the meaning of the text. On this basis, and through a comparison with transmitted texts, the identities of the main characters “Shi Liu” and “Master” in the bamboo manuscript are discussed. We find that the words, deeds, and thoughts of “Shi Liu” and “Master” bear certain similarities to “Shi Qiu” and “Confucius” as recorded in literature.

Open Access
In: Bamboo and Silk

Abstract

In the Geling 葛陵 Chu manuscripts, there are a number of characters usually transcribed as yan in published transcriptions. This essay suggests a tentative interpretation of these characters. The first section examines four types of direct transcriptions and their interpretive transcriptions. Then, the essay argues these variations are graphic rather than lexical. In its context, the phrase yan zhong 延鐘 can be translated as “melodic bells,” and the emphasis on melodic bells serves to highlight the high rank of ritual.

Open Access
In: Bamboo and Silk

Abstract

The *Si gao 四告 (Four Proclamations) manuscript, published in the tenth volume of the Qinghua daxue cang Zhanguo zhujian 清華大學藏戰國竹簡 (Warring States Bamboo Slips in Collection of Tsinghua University), consists of four texts of prayers of Zhou Gong Dan 周公旦 (Dan, the Duke of Zhou), Zengsun Boqin 曾孫伯禽 (Great-Grandson Boqin; i.e., the Duke of Lu 魯公), Zengsun Man 曾孫滿 (Great-Grandson Man; i.e., King Mu of Zhou 周穆王), and Zengsun Shao Hu 曾孫召虎 (Great Grandson Shao Hu; i.e., Duke Mu of Shao 召穆公). They are not only important in terms of their content, but are also presented in a quite special format of considerable significance for understanding the process of book formation in pre-Qin times.

Open Access
In: Bamboo and Silk
Author:
The notion of effortlessness is central to the self-understanding of the Tibetan contemplative tradition known as Dzogchen. This book explores this key notion from a variety of perspectives, highlighting the distinctive role it plays in the Dzogchen approach’s doctrinal architecture and meditative programme.
The book’s focus is on the early development of the Dzogchen tradition, especially as codified in a set of hitherto unstudied commentaries by the 10th-century scholar and meditation master Nubchen Sangye Yeshe. A full annotated translation of the commentaries is provided, along with an edition of the Tibetan texts on facing pages.