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Gérard de Nervals Einleitung zu Voyage en Orient
Die vorliegende Arbeit erschließt Gérard de Nerval als wegweisenden Dichtungstheoretiker für eine Narrativik der Moderne.
Gérard de Nervals „Voyage en Orient“ verhandelt eine Reise in den Orient. Ihr vorgeschaltet ist allerdings ein umfassender Reiseteil durch Europa. Die Arbeit zeigt, dass dieser europäische Reiseteil die Funktion eines theoretischen Vorworts einnimmt: Darin wird das Dichtungsverständnis erläutert, nach dessen Maßgabe der Orientroman gestaltet ist. Leitend ist dabei die Frage, welche Form wahre Kunst und Dichtung hat. Zu deren Beantwortung greift der Erzähler höchst subtil und kunstvoll ein überbordendes Spektrum an Texten europäischer Dichtungs- und Kunsttheorie auf. Die Reise führt somit durch ein „Text-Reich über die wahre Form von Kunst“, welche für Nerval im Roman gründet.
In: Horace across the Media
In: Horace across the Media

Abstract

A year after receiving the 2000 Nobel Prize in Literature, Gao Xingjian, who had been exiled from China in 1987, remarked that he had to embark on a “second escape” from the “public’s halo, flowers, prizes, and crown.” In this paper, I argue that Gao’s “second escape” is not a literal rejection of fame, but rather the situating of the monumentalizing effects of the Nobel’s prestige as a subject of his transmedial reflection. In his first major post-Nobel project – l’année Gao (The Year of Gao, 2003–2005), Gao portrays death in five different expressions (paintings, poetry, theatre, opera, and cinema) that echo and respond to each other, thereby presenting a coherent attempt to restore his sense of fragility and autonomy as a Nobel laureate.

Open Access
In: Journal of World Literature
Author:

Abstract

The marketing of world literature today is marked by the larger migration of literary culture to Web 2.0. This has gone hand in hand with a reconsignment of influence of orthodox authorities, from established reviewing organs to awards, to the amateur readers congregating on social media platforms, first and foremost on Goodreads, the world’s largest online community for circulating literary recommendations and socialization. The present paper traces this reconsignment of influence by examining the engagement of the Goodreads community with the works that were awarded the Booker Prize or the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction between 2015 and 2019, looking at reader reviews as well as the discussions ensuing from those reviews. As such, the reconsignment of influence is concluded to be regulated by the algorithmic rules of Goodreads and its proprietary platform, Amazon.com.

Open Access
In: Journal of World Literature
Author:

Abstract

The categories of ‘art’ and ‘life’ play a central role in the critical reception of Allan Kaprow’s Happenings, which have predominantly been read as a generalized, “blithely affirmative” and even “faintly embarrassing” attempt to fuse the two. This paper attempts to rethink the definition and relation of these two categories in Kaprow’s work. Rather than an uncritical attempt to fuse art and life, I suggest, Kaprow’s Happenings developed an increasingly complex, branching and networked structure, capable of staging a plurality of different modes of interaction between work and world. This paper explores both the modes and the contexts of these interactions in three of Kaprow’s Happenings of the 1960s.

Open Access
In: Journal of Avant-Garde Studies
Author:
What is the ocean’s role in human and planetary history? How have writers, sailors, painters, scientists, historians, and philosophers from across time and space poetically envisioned the oceans and depicted human entanglements with the sea? In order to answer these questions, Søren Frank covers an impressive range of material in A Poetic History of the Oceans: Greek, Roman and Biblical texts, an Icelandic Saga, Shakespearean drama, Jens Munk’s logbook, 19th century-writers such as James Fenimore Cooper, Herman Melville, Jules Michelet, Victor Hugo, Jules Verne, Jonas Lie, and Joseph Conrad as well as their 20th and 21st century-heirs like J. G. Ballard, Jens Bjørneboe, and Siri Ranva Hjelm Jacobsen.
A Poetic History of the Oceans promotes what Frank labels an amphibian comparative literature and mobilises recent theoretical concepts and methodological developments in Blue Humanities, Blue Ecology, and New Materialism to shed new light on well-known texts and introduce readers to important, but lesser-known Scandinavian literary engagements with the sea.
In: A Poetic History of the Oceans
Open Access
In: A Poetic History of the Oceans