Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 595 items for :

  • Criticism & Theory x
  • Upcoming Publications x
  • Upcoming Publications x
  • Just Published x
  • Nach Zugangsart einschränken: Open Access x
  • Nach Ebene eingrenzen: All x
Clear All

Abstract

This article concentrates on costumbrist cinema, an approach to filmmaking characteristically concerned with the accurate representation of the customs, habits and cultural idiosyncrasies of a particular society or group of people. After defining and contextualizing the concept of costumbrismo, the article draws on Jean-Pierre Meunier’s modes of filmic identification to describe the experiential structure of costumbrist cinema, characterized by the existent or non-existent recognition of the specific cultural representations. Following this, the potentially evocative feature of costumbrist cinema is considered with regard to its nostalgic dimension. To conclude, Volver (Pedro Almodóvar, 2006), A Separation (Jodâyi-e Nâder az Simin, Asghar Farhadi 2011), Still Walking (Aruitemo aruitemo, Hirokazu Kore-eda 2008) and Happy as Lazzaro (Lazzaro felice, Alice Rohrwacher 2018) provide the basis on which to outline different approaches to cinematic costumbrismo and their functions within the film’s narration: (1) costumbrismo as narrative imperative; (2) extensive dimension; (3) cinematic contemplation and (4) costumbrist framework as subversive potential.

Open Access
In: Studies in World Cinema
Author:

Abstract

Exploring the representation of space and belonging in Javanese literature, I will use Suparto Brata’s novel Donyane wong culika (The World of the Untrustworthy, 2004) as a case study. Firstly, I will focus on how literary, linguistic and epistemological features shape and give meaning to Javanese spatiality and on how the references to Javanese customs, literary and cultural traditions, and the Javanese mind in the twentieth century may address and evoke feelings of belonging. Secondly, as the novel features historical events as a kind of backdrop, I will pay attention to what Le Juez and Richardson (2019) call the perceptions of associated loci and on how these loci articulate individual and collective memories of the 1965–66 events, a traumatic period in postcolonial Indonesian history.

Open Access
In: Philological Encounters
Author:

Abstract

The article examines F. M. Dostoevsky’s visit to London in the summer of 1862, in the course of his first trip abroad, which resulted in the writing of Winter Notes on Summer Impressions. A Summer-Long Feuilleton. The task to untangle the impact of numerous impressions on Dostoevsky’s creative process is initiated and the newly arisen circumstances that he encountered on his return to St. Petersburg highlighted. Winter Notes is viewed as a groundbreaking work in Dostoevsky’s canon that contains the seeds of future great works, though not primarily in accordance with the multiple ideologically based readings that have sought to define it. Instead Winter Notes is recognised for its author’s aesthetic explorations into poetics within the confines of Tsarist censorship which required that ‘Official Nationality’, the imperial ideological doctrine be upheld. Dostoevsky’s visit to the 1862 International Exhibition and its art galleries is addressed for the first time on the basis of his brother Mikhail’s letters and other evidence. The exhibition building and the works of William Hogarth, John Martin and J.M.W.Turner are singled out. Their imprint on Dostoevsky’s feuilleton is observed through the stages of impressions gained via intermedial interplay. It affirms that pre-existing notions in the ‘discourse of Englishness’ were absorbed and reinvented by Dostoevsky with the use of figurative language, clarifying the origin of metaphors used in the text, together with literary and biblical allusions. A list of Russian and British artists exhibiting in the International Exhibition of 1862 is included.

Open Access
In: The Dostoevsky Journal
Author:

Abstract

This article examines two Chinese sci-fi blockbusters, Crazy Alien and The Wandering Earth, under a theoretical framework of global governance and its variation in Chinese state rhetoric. The article explores how the notion of global governance in China is echoed, reconfigured, and mediated in these two films via their depiction of China’s leadership in solving fictionalized futuristic global challenges. It argues that while Crazy Alien criticizes the present, neoliberal global governance, The Wandering Earth envisages a new global governance system led by China. These two films provide case studies of sci-fi blockbusters produced in a non-Western context and illustrate the convergence of Chinese politics with its sci-fi film production.

Open Access
In: Studies in World Cinema
Author:

Abstract

This essay examines the interplay of form and content in early Islamic expressions of taqwā (translated variously as piety, or fear or consciousness of God), with a primary focus on prophetic hadith and the orations of ʿ⁠Alī ibn Abī Ṭālib. Through this analysis, two major observations can be made. First, expressions of taqwā in these sources are indelibly corporeal, articulated through forms of bodily intimacy, whether between rider and mount, or as the cure for bodily sickness. Second, attention to both form and content and their interstices elucidates a picture of taqwā that expands our notion of embodiment to encompass the realm of the internal. Taqwā involves techniques of the limbs, tongue, eyes, and ears as well as techniques of the heart. To demonstrate this, I explore both the ways that believers are enjoined to seek taqwā as well as how taqwā is articulated as enacting transformations in/on those believers.

Open Access
In: Journal of Arabic Literature

Abstract

Waiting for Godot is not often presented as homologous with Beckett’s narrative fiction. However, a close consideration of the status of the boy(s) in the play shows that the drama text undermines the dichotomy between inner and outer world, which Beckett was addressing in comparable ways in his novels and art criticism.

Open Access
In: Samuel Beckett Today / Aujourd'hui
In: Samuel Beckett Today / Aujourd'hui

Abstract

Recent developments in the critical arena indicate that scholars are showing a keen interest in tracing Samuel Beckett’s influence on, or presence in, the non-Western world. They focus on how the Beckettian oeuvre is translated and adapted in various corners of the world. This study aims to contribute to this trend by examining the adaptations of Waiting for Godot in Pakistan. It operates on two interconnected levels. First, it explores how the metaphor of Godot was employed to adapt to Pakistan’s political context. Second, it posits that the adaptable structure of Waiting for Godot empowers artists to mirror the audience’s worldview, resulting in one-of-a-kind interpretations that contest the Eurocentric perspective. The pliability of Beckettian oeuvre encourages diverse literary responses.

Open Access
In: Samuel Beckett Today / Aujourd'hui
Author:

Abstract

Syed Ahmad Khan (1817–1898) was one of the most prominent Indian Muslim reformists of the nineteenth century and was exceptional for the ways in which he proposed that nature and observations of nature were central to Islam. Like many nineteenth-century reformist narratives, Khan’s ideals on naicar (nature) routinely employed a rhetoric of ‘break,’ ‘renewal,’ and ‘purity’ to imply that Indo-Persian culture was in a state of malaise and in need of rejuvenation. Yet despite this outward denunciation, Khan’s reformist project also ironically reflected many qualities of Persianate Islam that had characterized Indo-Muslim culture before the nineteenth century. This article reconsiders Ahmad Khan’s modernism in light of the Persianate modes that he maintained to point out some of the rhetorical inconsistencies of modernist writing, and the historical lacunae which they create.

Open Access
In: Philological Encounters
Author:

Abstract

The idea of keywords was introduced in Raymond Williams’ seminal Keywords. A Vocabulary of Culture and Society (1976), and has since had a profound influence on research in multiple fields.

This article explores what the idea of keywords might contribute to the study of interlinear translations from Arabic into Javanese. The interlinear translation, which presents an Arabic text with a word-for-word Javanese translation appearing between its lines, is a space where languages, beliefs, and entire histories encounter one another on the page. Taking as my example the 1864 interlinear Babad Maulud (a Javanese translation of the Arabic Maulid Syaraf al-Anām, recited on the Prophet Muhammad’s birthday), I suggest that despite the Javanese translator’s overall literal translation strategy which attempted to duplicate the original, he or she decided to add “Javanese keywords” at particular points in the translation, with such exceptions revealing contemporary Javanese understandings of social etiquette, identity and genealogy.

Open Access
In: Philological Encounters