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Ambiguities of Self-Annotation in Pope and Byron
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What literary and social functions do self-annotations (i.e. footnotes and endnotes that authors appended to their own works) serve?
Focussing on Alexander Pope’s Dunciads and a wide selection of Lord Byron’s poems, Lahrsow shows that literary self-annotations rarely just explain a text. Rather, they multiply meanings and pit different voices against each other. Self-annotations serve to ambiguate the author’s self-presentation as well as the genre, tone, and overall interpretation of a text.
The study also examines how notes were employed for ‘social networking’ and how authors used self-annotations to address, and differentiate between, various groups of readerships.
Additionally, the volume sheds light on the wider literary and cultural context of self-annotations: How common were they during the long eighteenth century? What conventions governed them? And were they even read? The study hence combines literary analysis with insights into book history and the history of reading.
In: The Author as Annotator
In: The Author as Annotator
In: The Author as Annotator
In: The Author as Annotator
In: The Author as Annotator
Author:

Abstract

This study traces the play of thresholds in Beckett’s short text “neither”. Since its publication in 1976, the text has been haunted by its thematic indeterminacy. Originally published as a poem, it was gathered with other pieces of short prose on Beckett’s suggestion when he insisted that it was a short story. The protagonist (though it is too strong a term to be used in the present context) finds themself before the mobile gates of the neitherworld “whose doors once neared gently close/once turned away from gently part again”. Beckett’s text creates a paradigmatic limbo, a non-space tussling with the ghosts of being. The movement is not, as Garin Dowd contends, “from its presence to its absence, from its being to non-being, from its formation to its emptying”; the beingness of being is already reduced to shadows. The reflex of opening and closure, the subject of the text, is further displaced on to the door, effectively quashing the potency of human agency. The door here is the reality of being. The effigy of a person is left stranded on the in-between spaces. This inbetweenness is located on the site of excluded middle—a site considered untenable in the classical logic. Moreover, the study looks at the ontological praxis of this inbetweenness.

Open Access
In: Samuel Beckett Today / Aujourd'hui

Résumé

Entre Sam et Bram les lignes sont complexes et les couleurs varient. Amis et compagnons, sur des chemins de traverse, ils se rencontrent dans leur conception absolue de l’œuvre d’art. Beckett tente de parler des peintures et y reconnaît (là aussi) un inévitable échec. Bram lit Sam et aime s’y perdre.

Open Access
In: Samuel Beckett Today / Aujourd'hui

Abstract

This paper focuses on an adaptation of Beckett’s Waiting for Godot in the Muslim context of Pakistan. Firstly, it looks at previous performances of the play with female actors. Secondly, it examines why female characters are introduced in the adaptation, which is strikingly opposite to Beckett’s idea of characterization in Waiting for Godot. Thirdly, it explores how such alteration is significant in the context of the Muslim culture of Pakistan. Finally, the play thus adapted for a local audience is read in a political light.

Open Access
In: Samuel Beckett Today / Aujourd'hui
Author:

Abstract

Allusions to gendered violence and sexual assault in Samuel Beckett’s works raise difficult questions in today’s classroom and theatre auditoria. So too does the physical subjugation that Beckett’s female actors often endure on stage. How far might our post-#MeToo sensibilities usefully inform our reading of instances of gendered subjugation and sexualised violence in Beckett’s theatre? This article focuses on Not I as a playtext that combines intimations of sexual assault with a history of female actors suffering physically in performance. It uses the lens of rape play—enacted for therapeutic value within the BDSM community for sexual assault survivors—to read Not I as an embodied trauma narrative, and to open up discussion of forms of coercion and consent in Beckett’s work.

Open Access
In: Samuel Beckett Today / Aujourd'hui