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Film festivals around the world are in the business of making experiences for audiences, elites, industry, professionals, and even future cultural workers. Cinema and the Festivalization of Capitalism explains why these non-profit organizations work as they do: by attracting people who work for free, while appealing to businesses and policymakers as a cheap means to illuminate the creative city and draw attention to film art. Ann Vogel’s unprecedented systematic sociological analysis thus provides firm evidence for the ‘festival effect’, which situates the festival as a key intermediary in cinema value chains, yet also demonstrates the impact of such event culture on cultural workers’ lives. By probing the various resources and institutional pillars ensuring that the festivalization of capitalism is here to stay, Vogel urges us to think critically about publicly displayed benevolence in the context of cinema—and beyond.
Zur Grenzziehung zwischen fiktionalen und nichtfiktionalen Erzählwerken mit Untersuchungen zu Max Frischs Montauk und Lukas Bärfuss’ Koala
Author:
Der Fokus der Studie liegt auf der Analyse des Fiktionalitätsstatus von Erzählwerken in der literaturwissenschaftlichen Praxis. Im Zentrum steht die Frage nach dem Zusammenhang zwischen Fiktionalität, der Vorstellungskraft und dem Handeln von Autorinnen und Autoren sowie Leserinnen und Lesern. Dabei wird eine wechselseitige Erhellung zweier Fragen unternommen: Was ist Fiktionalität und Nichtfiktionalität? Und: Welchen Fiktionalitätsstatus haben Max Frischs Montauk (1975) und Lukas Bärfuss’ Koala (2014)? So werden Vorschläge erarbeitet und auf die Probe gestellt: eine literaturwissenschaftlich operationalisierte Definition von Fiktionalität und Nichtfiktionalität einerseits – eine Klassifikation der notorisch umstrittenen Fälle Montauk und Koala andererseits.

Abstract

A year after receiving the 2000 Nobel Prize in Literature, Gao Xingjian, who had been exiled from China in 1987, remarked that he had to embark on a “second escape” from the “public’s halo, flowers, prizes, and crown.” In this paper, I argue that Gao’s “second escape” is not a literal rejection of fame, but rather the situating of the monumentalizing effects of the Nobel’s prestige as a subject of his transmedial reflection. In his first major post-Nobel project – l’année Gao (The Year of Gao, 2003–2005), Gao portrays death in five different expressions (paintings, poetry, theatre, opera, and cinema) that echo and respond to each other, thereby presenting a coherent attempt to restore his sense of fragility and autonomy as a Nobel laureate.

Open Access
In: Journal of World Literature
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Abstract

The marketing of world literature today is marked by the larger migration of literary culture to Web 2.0. This has gone hand in hand with a reconsignment of influence of orthodox authorities, from established reviewing organs to awards, to the amateur readers congregating on social media platforms, first and foremost on Goodreads, the world’s largest online community for circulating literary recommendations and socialization. The present paper traces this reconsignment of influence by examining the engagement of the Goodreads community with the works that were awarded the Booker Prize or the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction between 2015 and 2019, looking at reader reviews as well as the discussions ensuing from those reviews. As such, the reconsignment of influence is concluded to be regulated by the algorithmic rules of Goodreads and its proprietary platform, Amazon.com.

Open Access
In: Journal of World Literature
In: Vorstellungen und Überzeugungen
In: Vorstellungen und Überzeugungen
In: Vorstellungen und Überzeugungen
In: Vorstellungen und Überzeugungen
In: Vorstellungen und Überzeugungen
In: Vorstellungen und Überzeugungen