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Abstract

This study explored democratic citizenship (DC) for students by developing a DC framework (DCF) with eight components. We employed the DCF to examine what and how much DC was included in Korean science textbooks and lab books focused on the topic of energy for Grades K–12. We found different DC components were included at different grade levels and some components were not present at all. To help address the uneven distribution of these components, we developed four DC inclusive science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics (STEAM) books related to the topic of energy. These books were designed with the DCF to foster rich DC learning experiences in school science. We engaged 13 teachers as consultants in a validation process when developing the DC inclusive STEAM books. This study describes the development and implementation of the DCF for preparing supplemental science curriculum materials that can improve students’ appreciation for DC.

Open Access
In: Asia-Pacific Science Education
Author:

Abstract

This study analyzed the responses of Korean students to interest, confidence, value, and instructional clarity in science and mathematics. To achieve this, the raw data of the recent student survey of TIMSS were analyzed. A one-way ANOVA was performed, and a post hoc test was performed. Additionally, a cohort analysis was performed to determine the changes when the fourth-grade students reached the eighth grade. The study results are as follows. First, interest and confidence were higher in the fourth grade than in the eighth grade. Second, in most cases, the average response of Singaporean students was the most positive, but in terms of interest and confidence in science in the fourth grade, the Japanese response average was generally the highest. Third, the average scores of Korean students on wanting to have a job related to their subject and knowing what teachers expect from them were low in both science and mathematics.

Open Access
In: Asia-Pacific Science Education

Abstract

There has been the growing concern about excessive numbers of false-positive results published in the scientific literature. Cognitive bias plays a considerable role in triggering false findings that involve indirect and unwitting self-deception by scientists. This study considers the sociocultural differences in cognitive bias between Korean and Indonesian scientists. A cognitive bias assessment (CBA) was developed and administered to 184 professors, lecturer assistants, doctoral students, and master’s students in South Korea and Indonesia. The CBA results revealed some similar response patterns between Korean and Indonesian scientists. Additionally, the detection of 19 potential differential item functionings (DIFs) demonstrates the influence of sociocultural factors on how scientists interpret to each item. Finally, the Indonesian scientists scored significantly higher in optimism and belief bias. This study discusses the importance of awareness of cognitive biases, particularly the role of science education to reduce biases through systematic thinking, reasoning, and judgment by understanding scientific methods.

Open Access
In: Asia-Pacific Science Education

Abstract

This study describes the development of a climate change SSIBL-STEAM program that was aligned to the Grade 6 elementary school national curriculum using the ADDIE model for design. The efficacy of the climate change SSIBL-STEAM program was investigated by measuring the impact of the program on cultivating elementary students’ personalities (sociality, morality, emotion) and STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, Mathematics) competencies (convergence, creativity, challenge, caring). Twenty-five Grade 6 students and three public elementary school teachers participated in this study. Data were collected using two instruments designed to examine character and STEAM competencies before and after the program. Additionally, field notes and student learning outcomes were collected and qualitatively and quantitively analyzed. The results indicated that students improved significantly in their character and STEAM competencies, especially morality, emotion, and convergence factors. This study was expected to be an example of the combined approach with SSIBL and STEAM.

Open Access
In: Asia-Pacific Science Education

Abstract

The suitability and characteristics of middle school inquiry activities in the 2015 National Curriculum of Science in Korea were studied from the perspective of eight science teachers with rich experience in teaching science inquiry activities. In-depth interviews revealed problems teachers experienced while conducting inquiry classes. Problems were classified into five categories: inquiry level, method, tool, inquiry result, difficulty in guidance, and safety. Based on this analysis, strategies for an inquiry improvement plan are suggested, including that quantitative inquiry requiring numerical interpretation of data obtained from the process of inquiry should be emphasized. Concrete guidance of inquiries should be provided for non-major science teachers to help them instruct inquiries more easily. Institutional improvement is needed to develop curriculum activities and the improvement of science lab and classroom environments are necessary for conducting inquiry activities utilizing technology. The results of this study can contribute to the development of science inquiry activity programs.

Open Access
In: Asia-Pacific Science Education
Author:

Abstract

We have entered the Fourth Industrial Revolution, which has brought widespread digital transformation with advanced and broadened technologies including artificial intelligence (AI). To help students prosper in a world full of AI applications, it is important for us to offer students sufficient AI-integrated learning opportunities across different subjects, including science. In this position paper, a pedagogical approach to AI-integrated science education through facilitating epistemic discourse is proposed. To establish a foundation for this integration, epistemic similarities and differences between how scientific knowledge is constructed and how AI agents learn are compared, referring to Chinn et al.’s (2014) epistemic cognition framework that attends to epistemic aims, ideals, and processes. Four bins of instructional strategies for facilitating epistemic discourse in AI-integrated science classrooms is suggested, which will help students more readily act as informed knowledge constructors, critics, and users of AI and science, who can pose questions that matter to their lives.

Open Access
In: Asia-Pacific Science Education
Authors: and

Abstract

Socio-scientific issues (SSIs)-based instruction is considered a potentially useful pedagogical approach for helping teachers to address the scientific literacy competencies outlined in the national curriculum. However, its effective implementation in the classroom requires teachers to have adequate pedagogical knowledge and skills. In this study, we engaged 45 pre- and in-service biology teachers in an 8-week SSIs teaching-oriented course. The course was designed to provide teachers with theoretical knowledge and practical SSIs teaching experience. Using data collected from the SSIs-based instruction questionnaire, interviews, and course assignments, we explored teachers’ perceptions and attitudes towards SSIs-based instruction. The results of quantitative and qualitative analysis indicated that teachers had a high awareness of some core aspects of SSIs-based instruction and perceived themselves as having sufficient knowledge about SSIs pedagogical aspects. Teachers also demonstrated positive attitudes and perceptions about SSIs-based instruction. However, teachers still recognized the challenges of the SSIs teaching implementation for biology teachers in Indonesian school contexts. Teachers considered factors such as curriculum requirements, teachers’ competency, and students’ characteristics as the SSIs teaching challenges. In addition, teachers expressed concerns about their capacity in managing the SSIs discussion activities.

Open Access
In: Asia-Pacific Science Education

Abstract

This study investigates what perspectives younger students considered and how they experienced the complexity of multiple perspectives about autonomous vehicle issues. Over the course of 6 weeks, 28 seventh-grade Korean students participated in role-play and group discussion to understand different perspectives on the issue. We qualitatively analyzed students’ positions toward these issues before and after the class and their perspectives in group decision making. The results indicate that students showed anxiety toward artificial intelligence systems, thus opposing it. They also explained where their concerns about the new technology arose to justify their views and opposition. We also found different patterns when students experienced uneasiness and conflicts in a group decision-making process. The patterns can be classified as (1) exploring multiple perspectives for decision making and (2) experiencing conflicts in working toward group consensus. Implementations for incorporating diverse perspectives into teaching strategies are discussed.

Open Access
In: Asia-Pacific Science Education

Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic has led teachers in the Philippines to rely on technology to provide and support continued education for K-12 students. However, it is not only technology, but also the interactive online learning environments crafted by teachers that impact student science learning. To support teachers to cope with pandemic teaching, the government provided professional development in the form of teacher-training webinars. This study evaluated the webinars using Universal Design for Learning (UDL) principles to understand the impact these professional development sessions had on science teachers’ self-efficacy for delivering science instruction during the pandemic. The study found that webinars including UDL design elements improved science teachers’ self-efficacy for teaching science and there were no significant differences in teacher perceptions relative to gender or teaching experience. Implications for the use of UDL to design long-term professional development offerings beyond the pandemic are discussed.

Open Access
In: Asia-Pacific Science Education
Authors: and

Abstract

This study investigates pre-service teachers’ beliefs about learning physics and explores how beliefs correlate with learning achievement as evidenced by conceptual understanding and grades in a year-long physics course. To investigate beliefs about learning physics, 14 second-year pre-service teachers in a teacher training program in South Korea completed a Likert-style questionnaire called the Beliefs About Learning Physics Survey (BAPS). To measure learning achievement, final grades for the physic course were obtained and the Force Concept Inventory (FCI) was used to assess conceptual understanding. Analysis revealed that pre-service physics teachers’ beliefs about learning physics had a positive correlation with conceptual understanding but not with motivational beliefs. Students’ grades in physics had a positive correlation with cognitive beliefs, regardless of changes in pre- and post-test responses. Implications about how to utilize pre-service physics teachers’ beliefs about learning physics as an epistemological resource for teaching and learning physics are discussed.

Open Access
In: Asia-Pacific Science Education