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Abstract

In this research the authors explore ClasSimVR, a proof-of-concept immersive virtual reality (ivr) application. This software is designed to support pre-service teachers (psts) implementation of a School-Wide Positive Behaviour Interventions and Supports (swpbis) approach to challenging student behaviours. ClasSimVR offers users the opportunity to engage with immersive hypothetical scenarios, whereby virtual students display challenging behaviours. Users respond to these behaviours with a range of possible actions aligned with a swpbis approach. The authors draw on a research-through-design (rtd) methodology to explore the design process of ClasSimVR. The article investigates the implications of an expert evaluation (n=5) conducted as part of the design process of creating ClasSimVR. More broadly, this research contributes to the discourse surrounding the design and implementation of immersive learning environments in educational contexts.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy
Author:

Abstract

Visual methods have been emphasised as alternative and complementary to traditional data collection methods in research with children and as useful tools in presenting conceptual and analytical frameworks. In their capacity to evoke the non-rational and material aspects of life, visual methods are also particularly beneficial in exploring everyday, taken for granted, institutional food practices. This article describes the way in which two sets of visual methods, namely representations and researcher-created data, were utilised within a study on a changing food practice in a Norwegian kindergarten. The representation is of a conceptual model, featuring Hedegaard’s cultural-historical wholeness approach and Fullan’s change model, which is visually presented. With this visualized conceptualisation, the study realises the goal of understanding the societal, institutional and individual perspectives in the change process. The researcher-created data included visual materials and video observations, exemplifying the change outcomes in relation to children’s experiences and participation in the “new” meal situation as well as their liking of, acceptance and consumption of the new food. This article concludes that the visual methods adopted are helpful both in conceptualisation and in data collection and generate important insights about the change of food practices.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy

Abstract

In this article, the authors intra-act with conceptual toolkit to examine noncomplaint learning of a ropemaking activity at The Norwegian Fisheries Museum in Bergen. Barad’s concepts of intra-action and diffraction allow us to perceive the rope as noncompliantly diffracting into the two different SpaceTimes of the 19th and 21st centuries. The former SpaceTime is intra-actively constituted by historical ropemaking craftship and the museum staff, and the latter by the children’s approaching the ropemaking through toys and play. In the overlap of the entanglements of the two SpaceTimes, noncompliant and ‘new areas of curiosity’ (, p. 123) unfold and continue the rope’s diffraction into the city. By following the intra-active community of Ida and the rope, the authors map entanglements of more-than-human worldings and conclude with a call for more museal diffractions that can (intra-)activate the museum’s relational capacities in the ecology of the city.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy

Abstract

Through an ethnomethodological and dialogical encounter with Australian classrooms in the lived experience of two visual art (va) educators, the authors seek to learn how working between online and studio learning approaches shaped teacher perceptions of student learning during the outbreak of covid-19 in 2020 and 2021. The research has two phases. Phase 1 sees the two va educators create learning narratives. These narratives, reported in summary in the article, through both material and digital form became the baseline data. In Phase 2 these themes were reworked as conversational questions. These questions then became the stimulus for a critical reflective online video conversation between the two va educators. The resulting discussion around the borderlines looks beyond specific apps, platforms, or products that the teachers used, their successes and failures and examines the digital, non-digital, material, social relations and pedagogical realities and futures that may or may be possible in the context of the postdigital va secondary classroom. These educators have had little time to assess the shift from a strong and well researched studio-pedagogy to their virtual creative learning futures. The challenges of this shift are revealed through their personal experiences.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy

Abstract

This article investigates researchers’ methodological preconceptions when aiming at insight by involving visual methods in focus group interviews. The authors examine the photos used in photo-elicited focus group interviews in a project investigating Chinese and Norwegian early childhood education master students and teacher educators’ values and beliefs about proper artifacts for local and national belonging. They aim to adopt a “defamiliarizing mode” for their interpretations while emphasizing conflicting perspectives among the interviewees using provocative photos to prompt the discussion. To critically investigate the photos and problematize the authors’ choices of photos that reflect their preconceptions, this article is structured around the research question: how can photo-elicited interviews (pei) provoke researchers’ methodological preconceptions? The conflicting perspectives were analyzed building on Bakhtin’s concepts on outsideness, chronotope and polyphony. The authors’ analysis surfaces new insight into the limitations and strengths of photo-elicited focus group interviews contextualized in educational research.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy
Author:

Abstract

This article explores a series of non-linear films produced in an undergraduate digital arts course. Drawing on concept of the time-image, the researcher theorizes how filmmaking produces events of duration () for which bodies, living and nonliving, are actively engaged in processes of becoming. She makes connections with what Deborah Bird calls shimmer with practices of immediation () a brilliance that brings us into “the experience of being part of a vibrant and vibrating world” (, p. 53). The researcher argues that filmmaking is a shimmering practice in a kaleidoscope world – capable of generating affective, embodied, and sensorial events – practices-in-the-making. Thus the article aligns with the goal of this special topic: to analyze affective and somatic modes of filmmaking and their potential to create virtual openings in the ubiquitous quality of sensation in the city ().

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy

Abstract

We examine the feasibility of combining elements from the framework of program theory with the Documentational Approach to Didactics to gauge the fidelity and character of teachers’ implementation of scripted teaching sequences for primary school. By analyzing two video-recorded lessons from two teachers’ implementation of the program Thinking, Reasoning, and Reckoning, we found that the teachers made adaptations to the prescribed organization of teaching. Both teachers attended to the intended organization of content, but their attendance to the intended classroom interaction patterns differed. Through the Documental Approach to Didactics, we could explain some of the differences between the teachers. The findings provide a background for a discussion of teachers’ adaptations to the new resource and the documental genesis process initiated by the implementation. The results will be used for revising the teacher guide used in the implementation.

The impact sheet to this article can be accessed at 10.6084/m9.figshare.19493891.

Open Access
In: Implementation and Replication Studies in Mathematics Education

Abstract

This paper presents an implementation process model for designing and implementing tasks that provide formative feedback in the online learning environment of mathematics classrooms. Specifically, the model operationalises components of Vergnaud’s notion of scheme. The implementation process model features a task sequence guided by controlled variation and a ‘dual scheme idea’. Using such a sequence of tasks, this work illustrates how Vergnaud’s notion of scheme can be used to aid teachers in hypothesising about their learners’ understanding of problems involving linear equations, ultimately providing improved feedback for teachers and improved opportunities for student learning in online environments. In Denmark, the online environment matematikfessor.dk is used by approximately 80% of Danish K-9 students.

The impact sheet to this article can be accessed at 10.6084/m9.figshare.19493846.

Open Access
In: Implementation and Replication Studies in Mathematics Education

Abstract

Since their inception, Game Studies and its sub-discipline Historical Game Studies have stressed the pedagogical potential of (historical) games for learning. Today, popular off-the-shelf historical digital games such as Assassin’s Creed: Origins (2017), Total War: Three Kingdoms (2019), and Red Dead Redemption (2010) have achieved period-faithful and authentic interactive representations of elements of history that possess pedagogical value distinct from written accounts. To substantiate this claim, the authors forward a multimodal account of the varied ways in which historical knowledge is present in both game design and the gameplay experience. Their approach is illustrated with an under-investigated (yet valuable) mode of historical exploration – ‘Imaginative History.’ Using video and/or screen captures from several sequences of recorded game footage taken from A Plague Tale: Innocence, the authors present a case example from the game’s fantastical portrayal of the Black Death plague. The game’s value for teaching and learning is examined in relation to its re-mediation and subversion of past pre-modern folklore imaginations and beliefs concerning the Black Death. The authors also account for the relevance of the way games achieve a specific mode of engagement that is experientially based and structured within gameplay.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy