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Integrating Research on Education and Citizenship in the Context of Migration
This interdisciplinary volume on The Challenge of Radicalization and Extremism: Integrating Research on Education and Citizenship in the Context of Migration addresses the need for educational researchers to place their work in a broader social and political context by connecting it to the current and highly relevant issue of extremism and radicalization. It is just as important for researchers of extremism and radicalization to strengthen their conceptual links with educational fields, especially with education for democratic citizenship, as for researchers in education to get more familiar with issues of migration. This book meets a current shortage of research that addresses these issues across subjects and disciplines to inform both scientific and professional stakeholders in the educational and social sectors.

The volume is divided into three parts. The first part, Foundations, provides fundamental research on radicalization and the rejection of democratic values. In the second part, Analysis of Preconditions within the Educational Context, key risk and protective factors against radicalization for young people are explored. Finally, the third part, Approaches for Prevention and Intervention, offers concrete suggestions for prevention and intervention methods within formal and informal educational contexts. The contributions show how new avenues for prevention can be explored through integrating citizenship education’s twofold function to assimilate and to empower.
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Preamble

This paper follows on from the previous bulletin (), which covered the education remit of the Parliament’s Education and Skills Committee between February and August 2021. The following bulletin covers the education remit of the Education, Children and Young People Committee from September 2021 to January 2022.

Open Access
In: Scottish Educational Review

Abstract

Although there are no attendance or registration fees in the UK for publicly funded school education there are hidden costs in attending compulsory education. This article investigates one of the hidden costs: school uniform. We investigate the affordability of school uniform in Scotland, looking at what is required in school uniform policy (class uniform and Physical Education kit), the costs of uniform and to what extent the national minimum clothing grant makes uniform affordable for households on low incomes. For this research we use a unique national dataset of the school uniform policies of all 357 publicly funded secondary schools in Scotland and responses to Freedom of Information requests sent to all local authorities (n = 30). From analysis of the uniform policies and the requirements and application processes for the national minimum clothing grant we are able to draw together recommendations for the Scottish Government, local authorities and schools. We also found a compelling need for detailed data collection on how much it costs to clothe children for a whole school year.

Open Access
In: Scottish Educational Review

Abstract

This paper examines different curriculum making actors, discourses and practices at different sites and then situate Scotland and Wales within these. I illustrate the interconnected nature of different sites of curriculum making and explain how these exert influences in the two countries while acknowledging their social and cultural differences. Analysing of policy documents suggest that certain supra discourses and trends are evident in both countries following similar curriculum structures. Nevertheless, there are differences in the ways curriculum is constructed and the steps taken for increasing curriculum making capacity.

Open Access
In: Scottish Educational Review
Author:

Abstract

Within the social sciences, the term equity has a helpful and precise meaning – referring to a differentiated response to an individual’s distinct needs or circumstances. However, since the 2000s ‘equity’ has been recontextualised within national and international education policymaking as a generic term. This recontextualisation has led to ‘equity’ being used uncritically to refer to a range of related, and sometimes contradictory, concepts. This article draws on the literature to identify five framings of ‘educational equity’ within recent policy. It suggests that only one of these – which emphasises responsiveness to individual needs or characteristics – has clear conceptual alignment with the core principle of equity. The others either relate more strongly to the principle of equality or emphasise the tracking and measurement of outcomes. This article highlights the need for conceptual clarity to ensure the principle of equity is a helpful one in informing research, policy, and practice.

Open Access
In: Scottish Educational Review
Author:

Abstract

In a contemporary society dominated by visual media, critical visual literacy (cvl) is a significant skill to inculcate, and yet, in some educational systems, its integration in teaching and education has not (yet) achieved enough recognition, especially in a context like Pakistan. As it is assumed that students will develop the necessary competencies by themselves as they operate in a far more visually stimulating world today. This view, however, is contested in literature where it is claimed that students can learn to develop cvl competencies just like they develop their phonemic literacy skills. Thus, the current study investigated how the use of images in a classroom of 12-year-olds in Karachi, Pakistan can help them develop cvl. Using an action research methodology with video-recorded observations, focus-group interviews, teacher’s reflections, and students’ work, data was obtained over 10 weeks. The findings from the study suggested that as students analysed and interpreted images, they enhanced their abilities to consider multiple perspectives, critical thinking, application-based learning, and visualization, eventually, improving their engagement, learning, and development. However, for some students, the process of critical interrogation of images was found to be challenging. Also, a well-prepared teacher with pedagogical content knowledge on cvl was found equally important to involve students in more meaningful learning experiences.

Open Access
In: Scottish Educational Review

Abstract

Under Scotland’s Curriculum for Excellence, the health and wellbeing of school pupils is the ‘Responsibility of All’. Mental health is included in this though the extent to which secondary teachers feel confident to deal with the many and varied issues which their pupils present with is less clear. This pilot study seeks to explore the potential gap between the responsibilities that are assigned to Scottish secondary teachers and the responsibilities that they assume. A questionnaire, interviews and focus group were used to garner the views of a group of secondary teachers. Thematic analysis of the data allowed for an exploration of how the role of the secondary teacher with regard to mental health is perceived by those dealing with pupils on a daily basis. Views varied considerably illustrating that the complexity surrounding these issues should not be underestimated.

Open Access
In: Scottish Educational Review

Abstract

In this research the authors explore ClasSimVR, a proof-of-concept immersive virtual reality (ivr) application. This software is designed to support pre-service teachers (psts) implementation of a School-Wide Positive Behaviour Interventions and Supports (swpbis) approach to challenging student behaviours. ClasSimVR offers users the opportunity to engage with immersive hypothetical scenarios, whereby virtual students display challenging behaviours. Users respond to these behaviours with a range of possible actions aligned with a swpbis approach. The authors draw on a research-through-design (rtd) methodology to explore the design process of ClasSimVR. The article investigates the implications of an expert evaluation (n=5) conducted as part of the design process of creating ClasSimVR. More broadly, this research contributes to the discourse surrounding the design and implementation of immersive learning environments in educational contexts.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy

Abstract

This article explores the enabling factors and actors involved in the transformation pathways towards climate resilience of two German cities: Halle (Saale) and Mannheim. A specifically developed analytical framework served as basis for making the complex developments of the transformation paths of the two cities visible and comparable. The analysis has shown that despite strong similarities in terms of climate change impacts, the cities acted under very different political and economic conditions and thus applied particular strategic and tactical approaches and steering instruments. It can be stated that preparation of climate strategies, creation of a supporting central unit for climate issues and exemplary implementation of selected measures by the administration, as well as awareness-raising and cooperation with the stakeholders and citizens have played a key role in the cities’ transformation. In both cities, the city administration took the role of innovation organiser and orchestrated the pathway towards becoming climate resilient.

Open Access
In: Triple Helix
Fashion is an integral part of popular culture, closely intertwined with tales, magazines, photography, cinema, television, music and sports...up to the emergence of dedicated exhibitions and museums.
Fashion is undergoing a major digital transformation: garments and apparels are presented and sold online, and fashion trends and styles are launched, discussed and negotiated mainly in the digital arena. While going well beyond national and linguistic borders, digital fashion communication requires further cultural sensitivity: otherwise, it might ignite inter-cultural misunderstandings and communication crises.
This book presents the recent transformation of fashion from being a Cinderella to becoming a major cultural attractor and academic research subject, as well as the implications of its digital transformation. Through several cases, it documents intercultural communication crises and provides strategies to interpret and prevent them.