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Sound-Worlds of Central Europe explores the sound-world of early modern Silesia via the writings of humanists active there in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries who both observed musical culture and actively participated in it: a poet, a publisher, a pedagogue, a physician, a historian, and a regionalist. Such an approach makes it possible to reconstruct their perceptions and understandings of music—a constitutive element of this community. As these authors concentrated more on the representation of music than the art itself, the book reflects the collective memory of the republic of scholars: their individual and common imaginarium.
Islamische und christliche Perspektiven auf Theodizee und Theodizeesensibilität
Das Theodizeeproblem stellt den Gottesglauben in Frage. Wie ist dieser angesichts des Leidens in der Welt zu rechtfertigen? Jede Antwort auf diese Frage steht in der Gefahr, das Leid zu verharmlosen oder dem Einwand nicht mit Argumenten begegnen zu können. Die Arbeit widmet sich zunächst christlichen Lösungsversuchen, ehe sie diese in das Gespräch mit islamisch-theologischen Zugängen bringt. Unter Aufnahme der Kategorien der Philosophin Eleonore Stump wird aus christlicher Perspektive ein wertschätzender Zugang zum Koran entwickelt. Dieser soll verstehen helfen, wie Leiderfahrungen koranisch thematisiert werden. Zudem wird das islamische Recht als die symbolische Möglichkeit interpretiert, wie die im Theodizeeproblem angefragte Gerechtigkeit Gottes im Hier und Jetzt konkret werden kann. So nimmt die Arbeit das Gespräch über eine Frage auf, die sich Theologien unterschiedlicher Konfessionen stellt, und zeigt, wie die komparativ-theologische Forschung die Perspektive weiten kann.
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Abstract

Over the past two decades, the Swedish pentecostal movement has undergone a major transformation in its way of organizing and collaborating around mission work. In this explorative study, the purpose is to investigate how these and other changes have influenced how contemporary Swedish pentecostal churches understand and make use of the concept of mission. The data for the study consists of texts from the churches’ websites and draws on conceptual history in its theoretical and methodological approach. The findings of the study indicate a theological shift within the Swedish pentecostal movement. Among other things, it highlights a disconnect between the concept of mission and eschatological urgency and notes that priority is no longer given to mission as evangelism, over social work. The study also points to a linguistic instability associated with the concept of mission wherein the term “international work” is being used interchangeably with it and has, on some churches’ websites, even replaced the “mission” altogether, a finding that suggests an ongoing dispute over the definition of mission.

Open Access
In: Pneuma

Abstract

The demographic landscape in Southern Africa is experiencing a shift toward an older age group, and traditional family structures are being influenced by factors such as rural – urban migration and industrialization. This article examines the socioeconomic determinants of successful aging in Southern Africa, with a focus on the intersection of socioeconomic factors and theological perspectives on aging. It utilizes data collected in a 2018–2019 study that explored pastoral care for elderly caregivers of HIV and AIDS-affected children in Ramotswa, Botswana. The article employs a socio-theological gerontology framework to understand how socioeconomic determinants can support or hinder successful aging in the region. It emphasizes the importance of integrating contextual factors and intrapersonal aspects in addressing the aging phenomenon and provides recommendations for contextually informed policies and practices.

Open Access
In: Religion and Development
Author:

Abstract

The recapitulation theme, which focuses on Jesus as the obedient Second Adam, provides insight into many theological topics. When examined in relation to the atonement though, it is regularly deemed insufficient to construct a fully developed model because it emphasises Jesus’s obedient Incarnation and life, which seemingly makes his death insignificant. Consequently, recapitulation concepts are often combined with other atonement theories to gain validity. In contrast, this article argues recapitulation theology can create a fully-fledged atonement model that makes Jesus’s death on the cross essential because his willing obedience towards God is only complete when he endures unto death. Furthermore, the cross signals total rejection of the innocent Jesus, which makes his crucifixion the climax of the biblical pattern where God’s obedient messengers are rejected.

Open Access
In: Evangelical Quarterly: An International Review of Bible and Theology

Abstract

The beginning of the twentieth century was marked by colossal changes in various spheres of life, including art, where appeared numerous choreographies produced by both professional dancers and esoteric teachers. This article analyzes the choreography of George Gurdjieff, a dance practice simply called “Movements.” This practice was often considered as closely related to and being a product of the artistic environment of the time. The article argues that even though being the product of the time, Gurdjieff’s dance requires a close attention. It will show that his approach to dance downplays aesthetic and emotional aspects. Applying the hybrid methodology, this article will first identify the place of the Movements in Gurdjieff’s teaching. It will then illustrate how the Movements differ from modern German dance. Finally, it will analyze and describe the author’s ethnographic experiences in the study and practice of the Movements.

Open Access
In: Interdisciplinary Journal for Religion and Transformation in Contemporary Society

Abstract

The inclusion of women in leadership navigates between the issues of unity and what is considered biblical. Recent empirical research in two evangelical churches in the Netherlands indicates that addressing female leadership as a secondary topic relative to the centrality of the gospel facilitates local churches to meet both values. The classification secondary is clarified as well as challenged by the evangelical definition of salvation. This article argues that a broader understanding of what is seen as the heart of the gospel might be beneficial in the approach to contemporary topics like gender roles in the church.

Open Access
In: Ecclesiology

Abstract

This article aims to contribute to an intelligent examination of Pope Francis’ magisterium and to the development of post-conciliar Latin American theology which acquired its maturity during the third Episcopal Conference of Latin America and the Caribbean in Puebla, Mexico in 1979. Firstly, this article examines the genesis of the Puebla Conference: how it came about, and the social and ecclesiastical environment that inspired it. In the second and third parts, the contents of the Final Document are explored. The article focuses on the birth of the Theology of the People and on the synodal ecclesiology that is derived from it, two fundamental themes that advance post-conciliar ecclesiological discourse.

Open Access
In: Ecclesiology

Abstract

My essay positions Heidegger’s Black Notebooks (Schwarze Hefte) in the light of the later transformation of his thought after die Kehre, which introduces a new motif: “the withdrawal of Being.” And while the Jewish question disappears from his official discourse, the essay poses it nonetheless, despite and against Heidegger’s silence: Does the diagnosis from the Black Notebooks, which perceives the Jew as the agent of metaphysical destruction, still stand? In my analysis, the figurative Jew emerges in a role which Heidegger refuses to recognize: as a positive agent of letting-be, acting in accordance with Being’s rhythm of self-withdrawal.

Open Access
In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

Abstract

This essay surveys a number of prominent, recurring, and new directions in the growing scholarly discourse on the theme “Heidegger and Judaism” arranged under three headings. The first, the contrastive framing, encompasses cases in which the relationship between Heidegger and Judaism is perceived as antithetical. The second, the conjunctive framing, encompasses views claiming the existence of affinities and parallels between Heidegger and Judaism, grouped under three subheadings: “Heidegger and biblical thinking,” “Heidegger and Kabbalah,” and “Heidegger and the Jewish nation.” The third, historical perspectives, uses the approach of intellectual history to explore visions of Judaism that are developed as part of engagements with Heidegger’s philosophy.

Open Access
In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy