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Abstract

The special topic editors develop some preliminary ponderings on visual ethics, setting the stage for further contributions to this topic.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy

Abstract

In this article, the authors explore the visual and auditive modes in a stop-motion animation movie created by six young children in collaboration with their teacher. Drawing on social semiotic multimodal perspectives as the theoretical framework, the authors apply the concepts of multimodal orchestration and multimodal ensemble to discuss the relationship between the modes. This study is a qualitative case study in which the movie and video recordings from the production are used as data. The findings indicate that the relationship between the modes is characterized by layers that partially interact; sometimes they do and sometimes they do not. The moving images form the basis, while the voiceovers and background music to a small extent deepen or nuance the visual mode. In the article the authors question whether the sequential design of the digital apps used in the production of the movie may have contributed to this partial interaction between the modes.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy
Author:

Abstract

This article explores the theoretical, ethical, and practical opportunities and constraints considered in the methodological design and use of Dialogic Drawing, a participatory method for accessing qualitative data with young children. The method was designed to gather data about abstract phenomena from young children, as part of a larger study investigating the impact of discursive affordances in the first year of compulsory school in Western Australia. Methodological findings are reported from the application of Dialogic Drawing with 28 five-year-old children from diverse school-based semiotic landscapes in the Perth metropolitan area in Western Australia. Three strands of analysis are described and critiqued: drawn product, drawing process, and approach to drawing. Thematic analysis of drawn visual schema, dialog and embodied behaviours highlights the potential reach of Dialogic Drawing for interdisciplinary research significant to early childhood. The participating children revealed they perceive drawing as the child’s domain, endorsing Dialogic Drawing as a relevant and accessible method with capacity to gain untapped information significant to qualitative researchers seeking to elicit the authentic perspectives of children.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy
Author:

Abstract

Even though several students are experienced producers of audiovisual texts in their everyday lives, there is no quick fix to transfer these media production skills to the formal school setting. This article is based on a classroom study from a science class in a Norwegian upper secondary school. Instead of what they have become accustomed to in the subject – making written or oral reports – they were asked to create video reports using smartphone applications they have learned to use in everyday life. The article argues that the students meet such a task with doubt and they do not necessarily draw upon their vernacular skills in the formal school setting were the tradition of the linguistic text is well rooted. The habit of producing verbal texts in school is challenging to break and video production is experienced as difficult and time consuming. However, this article argues that there is much to be gained if teaching supports students to ‘break habits’. While this opens for students’ doubts and hesitations, breaking habits also can inspire inquiry, creativity and new learning.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy

Abstract

It is undeniable that climate change has become one of the greatest global challenges facing humanity in the coming decades. Since the Earth Summit held in Rio de Janeiro in 1992, all climate summits have emphasized the importance of sustainability through commitments that set the framework for a low-emission development model. Education, as a training field for the rest of the professions, has the responsibility to promote sustainability and this would be feasible considering environmental education as the backbone of the rest of the subjects of the different educational stages. This article presents the visual methodology of knowledge modeling through the use of concept maps and the free software Cmap Tools (ihmc, Florida) as a possibility to promote environmental awareness and sustainability in teachers in training. In compliance with the 4th and 15th sdg s of the 2030 Agenda, the theme of “biosphere reserves” was selected. The intention was to develop conceptually transparent audiovisual teaching material which would enhance environmental education. This material can be used by any primary school anywhere in the world as an alternative to textbooks and as a proposal for motivation and meaningful learning for their future primary school students.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy

Abstract

This article explores how higher education students express their worldviews and sense of belonging based on a study on mediagraphy as a learning activity. Empirical data are drawn from a study conducted in 2020 with master’s students (n=25, aged 20–30 years) in a Norwegian university. The students collected data from family members and produced short digital stories about their own daily lives juxtaposed against the daily lives of three earlier generations. The mediagraphies were analyzed by narrative analysis in a process of reflexive interpretation. A key finding is how the stories involve global imagination, a mode of thought that entails envisioning the world, placing oneself in it, and relating to other people on a global level. To give a coherent insight into the mediagraphy project, a clip accompanies the article, presenting one student’s mediagraphy. The findings show that, as a learning activity, mediagraphy can potentially be a bridge between everyday experiences and academic discussions related to media influence, ethics, and literacy.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy

Abstract

Contemporary depictions of learning in early years research and practice are mostly located within formal educational institutions. Educational experiences that take place for young children in the family home, and across generations, are much less visible, despite persistent claims concerning the importance of the wider family in early experience. During covid-19 pandemic lockdown, however, learning at home with family members became much more visible as private and public settings coalesced. In the present study 2-4-year-old Filipino children’s intergenerational experiences at home during lockdown were shared through visual data, as a source of valued learning—highlighting the pedagogical role of family. The authors’ interest in this article is to explore what kinds of learning were made visible—by whom, for whom. Special emphasis is given to intergenerational engagements between young children and older adults, as represented by the families themselves. Heywood and Sandywell’s concept of ‘visibilization’ is operationalized as a visual route to these sites of production—the images themselves, their intended audience, and their circulation. Videos produced by families portray intergenerational arenas for learning. The mediating role of the sandwich generations in these intergenerational encounters are made visible in the private and public sphere of social media.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy

Abstract

In this research the authors explore ClasSimVR, a proof-of-concept immersive virtual reality (ivr) application. This software is designed to support pre-service teachers (psts) implementation of a School-Wide Positive Behaviour Interventions and Supports (swpbis) approach to challenging student behaviours. ClasSimVR offers users the opportunity to engage with immersive hypothetical scenarios, whereby virtual students display challenging behaviours. Users respond to these behaviours with a range of possible actions aligned with a swpbis approach. The authors draw on a research-through-design (rtd) methodology to explore the design process of ClasSimVR. The article investigates the implications of an expert evaluation (n=5) conducted as part of the design process of creating ClasSimVR. More broadly, this research contributes to the discourse surrounding the design and implementation of immersive learning environments in educational contexts.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy
Author:

Abstract

Visual methods have been emphasised as alternative and complementary to traditional data collection methods in research with children and as useful tools in presenting conceptual and analytical frameworks. In their capacity to evoke the non-rational and material aspects of life, visual methods are also particularly beneficial in exploring everyday, taken for granted, institutional food practices. This article describes the way in which two sets of visual methods, namely representations and researcher-created data, were utilised within a study on a changing food practice in a Norwegian kindergarten. The representation is of a conceptual model, featuring Hedegaard’s cultural-historical wholeness approach and Fullan’s change model, which is visually presented. With this visualized conceptualisation, the study realises the goal of understanding the societal, institutional and individual perspectives in the change process. The researcher-created data included visual materials and video observations, exemplifying the change outcomes in relation to children’s experiences and participation in the “new” meal situation as well as their liking of, acceptance and consumption of the new food. This article concludes that the visual methods adopted are helpful both in conceptualisation and in data collection and generate important insights about the change of food practices.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy

Abstract

In this article, the authors intra-act with conceptual toolkit to examine noncomplaint learning of a ropemaking activity at The Norwegian Fisheries Museum in Bergen. Barad’s concepts of intra-action and diffraction allow us to perceive the rope as noncompliantly diffracting into the two different SpaceTimes of the 19th and 21st centuries. The former SpaceTime is intra-actively constituted by historical ropemaking craftship and the museum staff, and the latter by the children’s approaching the ropemaking through toys and play. In the overlap of the entanglements of the two SpaceTimes, noncompliant and ‘new areas of curiosity’ () unfold and continue the rope’s diffraction into the city. By following the intra-active community of Ida and the rope, the authors map entanglements of more-than-human worldings and conclude with a call for more museal diffractions that can (intra-)activate the museum’s relational capacities in the ecology of the city.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy