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Die Entstehung des biblischen Konzepts der Leviten
Author: Raik Heckl
Die Untersuchung zeichnet die Entstehung des Levitismus nach. Dieser kommt erst in der spätvorexilischen Zeit als judäische Innovation des Stammeskonzeptes auf. Überlieferungen über den Jakobsohn Levi werden nach 722 in Juda zur Formung einer Gruppenidentität der Beamten und literalen Eliten genutzt. Mose und Aaron als Beamte des Gottes Israel werden Protagonisten dieser Gruppierung, weswegen man auch das Priestertum am Zentralheiligtum als Teil der Beamtenschaft integrierte, sodass u.a. im Deuteronomium von levitischen Priestern gesprochen wird. In der nachexilischen Zeit wurden eine Reihe von Berufen und Gruppen unter der Bezeichnung „Leviten“ als eine Art Tempelbeamtentum der Priesterschaft unterstellt. Damit wurde eine Professionalisierung des Kultbetriebes und eine radikale Trennung von kultischen und nichtkultischen Bereichen und Tätigkeiten verbunden. Nach diesem Konzept agierten die Leviten für das Volk und repräsentierten es in den nichtkultischen Bereichen des Tempeldienstes.

The study tracks the origins of the Biblical Levitism. It only emerged in the late pre-exilic period as a Judean innovation of the tribal concept. After 722, traditions about Jacob's son Levi were used in Judah to form a group identity of officials and literal elites. Moses and Aaron, as officials of the God of Israel, became protagonists of this group. Therefore, the priests at the central shrine were also integrated as part of the officials, so that Deuteronomy, for example, speaks of Levitical priests. In the post-exilic period, a number of professions and groups were subordinated to the priesthood under the designation "Levites" as a kind of temple office. In the process, a professionalisation of the cultic sector and a radical separation of cultic and non-cultic areas and activities took place. In this, the Levites acted on behalf of the people and represented them in the non-cultic areas of the temple.
Historical criticism of the Bible emerged in the context of protestant theology and is confronted in every aspect of its study with otherness: the Jewish people and their writings. However, despite some important exceptions, there has been little sustained reflection on the ways in which scholarship has engaged, and continues to engage, its most significant Other. This volume offers reflections on anti-Semitism, philo-Semitism and anti-Judaism in biblical scholarship from the 19th century to the present. The essays in this volume reflect on the past and prepare a pathway for future scholarship that is mindful of its susceptibility to violence and hatred.
Author: Cooper Smith
Elihu is among the most diversely evaluated characters in the Hebrew Bible. Attending to the inner-Joban allusions in the Elihu speeches (Job 32–37) provides both an explanation and appreciation for this diversity. After carefully defining allusion, this work identifies and interprets twenty-three allusions in Job 32–37 that refer to Job 1–31 in order to understand both their individual significance in the Elihu speeches and their collective significance as a compositional feature of the unit. This allusiveness is shown to both invite and explain the varied assessments of Elihu’s merits in the history of interpretation.
The Bible and the Academy in the Public Square. Essays for the Occasion of Professor John Barton’s 70th Birthday
Volume Editors: Hywel Clifford and Megan Daffern
Exegesis has ethical dimensions. This is the case for the Bible, which has a foundational status in traditional perspectives that is simultaneously contested in the modern world. This innovative essay collection, largely about Hebrew Bible/Old Testament texts, is written by an international team – all Doktorkinder of a pioneer in this area, Professor John Barton, whose 70th birthday this volume celebrates. With interdisciplinary angles, the essays highlight the roles and responsibilities of the biblical scholar, often located professionally between religious and secular domains. This reflects a broader reality: all readers of texts are engaged ethically in the public square of ideas.